SCUP
 

Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

FOUND 26 RESOURCES

REFINED BY:

  • Format: Reportx

Clear All
ABSTRACT:  | 
SORT BY:  | 
Report

Published
May 1, 2019

An Exploration of Lactation Policy and Lactation Facilities Cover

An Exploration of Lactation Policy and Lactation Facilities Across US Higher Education Campuses (Wellness Rooms)

Research Study Brief

SCUP and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing collaborated in a nationwide study to explore lactation policy and facilities in US colleges and universities. Download the report, learn about the study, and find many other related resources here.

Member Price:
Free

Non-Member Price:
Free

Report

Published
July 31, 2018

Connecting the Dots

Campus Form, Student Perceptions, and Academic Performance

This research evaluates the role the campus built environment plays in student retention and graduation, using the California State University (CSU) campuses as the sample.
Abstract: This report was produced by the researcher awarded the M. Perry Chapman Prize for 2016–2017.

This research evaluates the role the campus built environment plays in student retention and graduation. The relationship between objective and perceived measures of the physical campus and student academic performance was examined using the California State University (CSU) campuses as the sample. The results show that both objective and perceived measures are significantly associated with academic performance and provide higher education institutions with insight regarding the role of the physical campus in enhancing student retention and graduation rates.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Non-Member Price:
Free

Report

Published
January 1, 2018

P3 Performance for Higher Education

This is a SCUP Fellow Research Project Final Report for the 2016–2017 program. The researcher’s intention was to better understand P3 models and learn how they have performed, possibly generating some useful lessons for how P3 models can be applied with desired outcomes.
Abstract: Public-Private Partnership (“P3”) procurement models for built infrastructure serving higher learning institutions started to gain attention in North America in the late 1990s—mostly as an alternative approach to adding student housing at select universities and colleges. More recently, P3 models have been applied to a diverse range of higher learning projects, with some serving core academic and research functions.

Although many institutions are considering P3 approaches among their options to address emerging pressures to expand or update their facilities, their implementation is not yet common. The researcher’s intention was to better understand P3 models and learn how they have performed, possibly generating some useful lessons for how P3 models can be applied with desired outcomes.
  • Institutions Mentioned: Sheridan College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning, University of Toronto-Scarborough, Drexel University, Ohio State University-Main Campus, York University-Keele Campus, University of Washington-Seattle Campus, University of California-Merced, Emily Carr University of Art and Design
  • Planning Types: Campus Planning
  • Tags: Original Research, Public-Private Partnerships (P3)

Member Price:
Free

Non-Member Price:
Free

Report

Published
September 28, 2017

Aligning the Strategic Campus Plan With the Institutional Mission in 2030

University Campuses as Complex Adaptive Assemblages

This study reviews the scholarly literature and the expert views of practitioners in campus planning (both virtual and physical) to forecast how campuses might evolve between now and 2030.
Abstract: This report was produced by the research team awarded the M. Perry Chapman Prize for 2015–2016.

What will be the impact of rapidly developing online learning modalities on the campus face-to-face experience over the next decade? What might campus planners need to look out for over the next 10 years as they strive to align their institution’s virtual and physical infrastructure with its mission?

This study reviews the scholarly literature and the expert views of practitioners in campus planning (both virtual and physical) to forecast how campuses might evolve between now and 2030. It views the university as a “complex adaptive assemblage” made up of many component parts working not within a systematic framework but as separate assemblages coexisting on campus affected by uncontrollable outside forces. These separate assemblages and their interrelationships can be better understood in a campus context by using experts in the fields of learning sciences, teacher professional development, educational technologies, learning environment/campus design, and others to form a cohesive idea of how the separate parts might come together to inform the future of higher education.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Non-Member Price:
Free

Report

Published
December 15, 2015

Peer Engagement as a Common Resource

Managing Interaction Patterns in Institutions

This research project introduces a common means for researchers in space design, education, and information science to develop principles and best practices to improve return on investment in the design of informal learning environments.
Abstract: This report was produced by the researcher awarded the M. Perry Chapman Prize for 2014–2015.

While face-to-face collaboration has been theorized to be a key element in intellectual development and cognition, no formal method of quantitative measurement has been applied to understand collective face-to-face learning in academic institutions or how patterns of interaction and individual reflection may reveal information exchange among students within educational institutions. To address this gap, this study introduces a novel tool and framework to promote the systematic study of peer collaboration for general use in education.

Results of this applied research will be useful to architects, interior designers, librarians, educators, and researchers interested in obtaining empirical evidence and applying it to the design of learning environments and the assessment of how well spaces intentionally relate to learning. This research project introduces a common means for researchers in space design, education, and information science to develop principles and best practices to improve return on investment in the design of informal learning environments.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Non-Member Price:
Free

Report

Published
October 1, 2015

Succeeding at Planning Survey Report

Results from the 2015 Survey of Higher Education Leaders

SCUP partnered with the Baker Strategy Group in 2015 to conduct a study with more than 2,200 leaders who plan at colleges and universities. Several themes emerged around planning challenges and how to respond, which are explored in this report.
Abstract: Succeeding at integrated planning at colleges and universities is a challenge. Many planning models do not work in higher education because they are not designed for higher education. Planning processes designed for corporations or non-profits do not account for the complex environment of higher education nor its unique challenges.

Many institutions struggle to leverage planning into lasting change because they create plans in a vacuum. They do not grasp the institution’s strategic issues or create a sound value proposition. They are not prepared for good planning.

To provide guidance on where to prioritize efforts, SCUP partnered with the Baker Strategy Group in 2015 to conduct a study with more than 2,200 leaders who plan at colleges and universities, and ran quantitative analysis on their responses. Several themes emerged around planning challenges and how to respond, which are explored in this report.

Member Price:
Free

Non-Member Price:
Free