SCUP
The SCUP office will be closed Friday, July 1 at noon eastern through July 4.
We hope you all have a wonderful and safe 4th of July holiday.
 

Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

FOUND 10 RESOURCES

REFINED BY:

  • Format: Planning for Higher Education Journalx
  • Tags: Communicationx

Clear All
ABSTRACT:  | 
SORT BY:  | 
Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
May 26, 2022

Around the Water Cooler, Minus the Water Cooler

Build College Community, Resilience, and Trust through Campus-Wide Meetings

More than 100 Muskegon Community College employees attend weekly, all-college meetings. These are essential touchpoints for communication, learning, and planning.

From Volume 50 Number 3 | April–June 2022

Abstract: Since 2011 Michigan’s Muskegon Community College has held all-campus meetings every Friday morning. Initially the meetings were for student services staff to share information and updates. When COVID-19 caused a rapid shift to virtual course and service delivery, meeting attendance more than tripled as the college community drew together to understand what was happening, what was needed from and expected of employees, and how to connect with colleagues when doing so in person was not possible.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
February 25, 2022

Fully Engaged

Integrated Planning Was Leveraged to Optimize Community Participation in the University of California, Berkeley’s Campus Master Plan

The most effective master plans are those that reflect the myriad voices of the institution. Engagement should be informative, inclusive, meaningful, and fun—and should be the product of an integrated process.

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: The most effective master plans are those that reflect the myriad voices of the institution. We’re finding the engagement process is fast becoming as important a product of the plan as the plan itself. Engagement should be informative, inclusive, meaningful, and fun—and should be the product of an integrated process. Leveraging the University of California, Berkeley’s Campus Master Plan as a case study, this article provides a framework for developing custom engagement strategies, and highlights examples, lessons learned, and tips for optimizing meaningful participation.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 25, 2021

Flexing Beyond the Pandemic

IT as a Change Leader: Driving Institutional Goals Around Retention and Enrollment

The IT division at Minnesota State University, Mankato— working as part of a campus-wide collaborative effort—quickly and successfully installed new tech in more than 100 classrooms within months of COVID-19 first appearing. Outcomes of the large-scale project are seen as a key attractor for incoming students, regardless of where they are learning.

From Volume 49 Number 3 | April–June 2021

Abstract: With the pandemic forcing education online, IT has become integral to keeping campuses moving forward. With a visionary team dedicated to student-centered experiences, the IT division at Minnesota State University, Mankato managed to quickly and successfully install new tech in more than 100 classrooms within months of COVID-19 first appearing. In this period of crisis, their information technology team created a campus-wide collaboration to introduce and integrate new course delivery opportunities. Outcomes of the large-scale project are seen as transformational and a key attractor for incoming students—regardless of where they are learning.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
November 23, 2020

Planning for Instructional Continuity

Develop a Communication and Implementation Strategy Before a Short-Term Class Disruption Happens

Classes can be cancelled because of inclement weather, faculty being unavailable, IT or power outages, pandemic-related closures, and other occurrences. The result of any of these circumstances can be a loss of instruction. St. Joseph’s University developed and applied a best practices guide to ensure the continuation of instruction in the advent of many short-term disruptions.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: When a class is cancelled because of weather, faculty unavailability, IT outage, power outage, or pandemic-related closure, it can result in a loss of instruction. This article details best practices for instructional continuity for many short-term disruptions. Different types of short-term disruptions are identified, as well as how they impact instruction based on course modality. Finally, the article suggests responses for the circumstances, provides a pathway to collaborate with faculty to create a best practices guide for instructional continuity, and shows how to develop a communication and implementation strategy for the plan to reset expectations about instructional disruptions.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2018

Fighting Fire With Fire

Reinvigorating the Language of American Universities

Might academia co-opt the concepts and language of the corporate world, repurposing them to meet the actual (and traditional) ends of our higher education institutions?

From Volume 46 Number 3 | April–June 2018

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2017

Is a Capital Project on Your Plate?

A Guide to Developing Effective Places for Teaching and Learning

Here are eight steps proven to help planners navigate the complexities and avoid the pitfalls that are too often part of the process when planning and funding capital projects.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: Do you have facility needs, like the need for more/improved space for instruction or infrastructure upgrades? Is it time to address deferred maintenance issues? Do you have reservations about venturing into unfamiliar territory? You’ll have to wrestle with some vexing matters—plan alternatives, big budgets, illusive funding sources, and an uninformed public.
Your concerns are valid. With a rich background as architectural firm principal and later as a community college project manager, the author has been through the drill. This article’s thoughtful advice details a project’s first phases—from initial concepts to developed projects with funding. It will head you toward success by helping to avoid the pitfalls.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2017

College Affordability and Institutional Pricing Policies

Institutions would do well to make their complex pricing policies more clear to students and families to help them understand how a higher education is more affordable than most people believe.

From Volume 45 Number 3 | April–June 2017

Abstract: The complexity of college pricing policies makes it difficult for students and families to understand how much they will have to pay and which colleges will fit their budgets. Colleges and universities should be able to explain their pricing and aid policies and why they have chosen them. Both financial aid and the high returns on a postsecondary education make college more affordable than most people believe. Colleges should take responsibility for clarifying this confusing issue.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2017

Beyond the Headlines

The Mechanics of a Tuition Reset

Might a tuition reset be right for your institution? This article is a behind-the-scenes look at the yearlong process of a tuition reset at Rosemont College.

From Volume 45 Number 3 | April–June 2017

Abstract: Beginning with the 2016–2017 academic year, Rosemont College took the bold step of reducing its tuition by 43 percent in an initiative termed “Our Tuition Promise.” The initial announcement generated national news coverage and resulted in a significant increase in applications.
Rosemont made this shift because it believed it was the right thing to do and was in keeping with the college’s mission and values. The process from start to finish was the result of a year of research and careful planning. While the headlines were big and up-front with the basic details, here is a behind-the-scenes look at how Rosemont College reset its tuition.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2015

Engaged Institutions, Responsiveness, and Town-Gown Relationships

Why Deep Culture Change Must Emphasize the Gathering of Community Feedback

Campus planners cannot discern the future requirements of their host communities if they do not know what those stakeholders want and need from their local institutions of higher learning.

From Volume 43 Number 4 | July–September 2015

Abstract: Colleges and universities typically do not gather routine feedback from community stakeholders, despite the fact that various organizations dedicated to the advancement of higher education continually have clamored for campus representatives to be more responsive to members of host communities. Recent petitions for “deep culture” change within academia—in combination with recent methodological advances in efforts to understand town-gown relationships—provide a comprehensible set of motives and details for institutions to become more fully engaged in the process of collecting systematic information from community members. A review of recent efforts to conceptualize and measure town-gown relationships using a tool known as the Optimal College Town Assessment (OCTA) is provided. After reviewing results from a previous study that piloted the OCTA tool, qualitative data gathered from a subset of community stakeholders in that original sample are presented and analyzed. The resulting themes are described and discussed in the context of enhancing evidence-based campus planning efforts that meet the call for greater higher education responsiveness.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 1998

Dealing With the Press

From Volume 26 Number 3 | Spring 1998

Abstract: Book review of Truth and Consequences: Colleges and Universitites Meet Public Crises, by Jerrold Footlick. ACE/Oryx Press, 1997. 192 pages. ISBN 0-89774-970-7. Pull quotes: "The press is not likely to change how it operates, so universities need to learn how to deal with the media more skillfully."

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access