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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Published
June 7, 2021

Increasing Alumni Giving at HBCUs

Start by Broadening the Job Titles of Those Who Do the Asking

By reviewing historical perspectives and conducting current-day personal interviews, the authors researched ways to engage HBCU alumni in giving back to their alma maters.

From Volume 49 Number 3 | April–June 2021

Abstract: In higher education philanthropy, alumni giving is a tremendously vital aspect, especially for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Throughout the history of alumni giving, though, HBCUs have not enjoyed the same success in soliciting and cultivating donations as Primarily White Institutions (PWIs) have. We compiled literature and conducted snowball sampling of private HBCU alumni to understand the motivations for giving or not to their alma maters.

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Published
April 15, 2021

Advancing Institutional Sexual Violence Prevention Education Through Faculty Research: Part 1

A Perspective From Campus Life

Vice President Diorio describes how Student Life (or other institutional areas) can successfully embrace faculty researchers to further institutional goals.
Abstract: Vice President Diorio describes how Student Life (or other institutional areas) can successfully embrace faculty researchers to further institutional goals. She highlights the benefits of developing tailored, evidence-based programming through in-house research partnerships and how Student Life can enhance the academic skills of their most-involved student activists.

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Published
April 15, 2021

Advancing Institutional Sexual Violence Prevention Education Through Faculty Research: Part 2

A Perspective From a Department Chair

Professor Armstrong describes the college's particular interest in sexual assault prevention and highlights the critical role that academic department chairs can play in designing institutional research partnerships that support faculty interests as well as the institution's.
Abstract: Professor Armstrong describes the college's particular interest in sexual assault prevention and highlights the critical role that academic department chairs can play in designing institutional research partnerships that support faculty interests as well as the institution's. She emphasizes many faculty's long term commitment to campus health and wellbeing and offers a clear-eyed view about how to leverage faculty research skills for campus goals.

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Published
April 15, 2021

Advancing Institutional Sexual Violence Prevention Education Through Faculty Research: Part 3

A Perspective From a Faculty Researcher

Dr. Cuomo, a pre-tenure feminist geographer, describes the research project at the heart of Lafayette College's initiative and shares her perspective on the potential for similar institutional research partnerships in higher education.
Abstract: Dr. Cuomo, a pre-tenure feminist geographer, describes her background and research agenda pertaining to sexual assault victim advocacy, education, and prevention. She describes the research project at the heart of Lafayette College's initiative and shares her perspective on the potential for similar institutional research partnerships in higher education.

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Published
April 15, 2021

Advancing Institutional Sexual Violence Prevention Education Through Faculty Research: Part 4

A Perspective From a Student Activist

Ella Goodwin, a Lafayette College senior and co-president of a student organization called Pards Against Sexual Assault, shares a student’s desire for clear institutional planning in areas of critical student concern.
Abstract: Ella Goodwin, a Lafayette College senior and co-president of a student organization called Pards Against Sexual Assault, shares a student’s desire for clear institutional planning in areas of critical student concern. She emphasizes that financial renumeration for the work that student activists already do to create and support vital campus programming is critical to successful partnerships. She highlights the importance of the opportunity to develop research skills for undergraduate students particularly beyond STEM.

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Published
March 26, 2021

Keep on Keepin’ on

Customized Retention Practices Helped Low Income and Single Mom Students to Persist

A support program for low-income and/or single-mother students to improve their persistence and retention was revisited 15 years after it had been launched at Charter Oak State College. Did follow-up with the graduates show that the effort had aided the former participants in obtaining their college degree? Had the collaboration between the institution’s Academic Services, Enrollment Management, and Financial Aid departments—and the support they offered—help the students to persevere? Based on survey results, was the program still of value, and what improvements needed to be made?

From Volume 49 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: This article is based on follow-up survey research from a doctoral case study that highlighted effective retention practices for low-income and/or single mothers who were students within the Women in Transition (WIT) program at Charter Oak State College. The concept of retention in this instance is an enrollment management practice aimed at maintaining a student population while aiding the institution in sustaining organizational success. Emphasis is placed on the retention concepts of social and academic integration that enabled the specific population to persist and succeed.

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Published
October 31, 2020

The Connected Campus

Building Long-Term Value and Agility by Connecting Offerings, Organizations and Operations

Campus environments play a vital role in student success. By making changes to their combination of spaces, institutions can respond to the shifts transforming higher education. Elliot Felix shares how colleges and universities can prepare for a more blended world by bringing together the digital and physical, enabling greater diversity and inclusion, and implementing flexible structures, staffing, space, and services. Sponsored Content: Knoll and brightspot strategy.
Abstract: Historic separations that defined higher education are dissolving: research is more interdisciplinary, online and on-campus learning are converging, wet and dry labs are blending, teaching and research overlap, and academia forges relationships with corporate partners. Institutions, by improving how they connect what they offer, how they are organized, and how they operate, can build value and agility to better assist their people on campus. Real-world examples in this white paper from Knoll and brightspot strategy discuss how campus spaces support student success, including how to fully use the campus; creating spaces that sustain diverse and flexible ways of working; thinking phygitally; and creating environments where today’s purpose-driven and entrepreneurial students (Gen Z) will thrive as they prepare to enter the workforce.

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Published
July 17, 2020

Academic Deans Reveal Their Leadership Styles

Annual Budgeting Becomes an Exercise in How Authority is Enacted

Academic deans adopt one of three approaches when developing the annual budget report for their colleges: distributed authorship, delegated authorship, or dominated authorship. Depending on the approach they select, deans can include and collaborate with their senior teams—or exclude, ignore, and alienate them. Their choice demonstrates how they lead.

From Volume 48 Number 4 | July–September 2020

Abstract: Few studies have investigated how academic deans enact their authority in Responsibility Center Budgeting (RCB), despite its widespread adoption. In this article I explore findings from a study that investigated how deans crafted a confidential annual budget report at an American university. Ultimately, deans adopted one of three approaches to crafting the report: delegating, distributing, or dominating authorship. Deans who distributed authorship collaborated with their senior teams to establish a shared sense of priorities for their colleges. In contrast deans who delegated and dominated authorship ignored and alienated members of their senior team during the budget review, engendering confusion and frustration.

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Published
April 8, 2020

Fostering Innovation on Ohio’s Co-Located Campuses Through Collaborative Planning

This is the SCUP Fellow Research Project Final Report for the 2018–2019 program. This research project investigates whether co-located institutions, specifically, and competing institutions of higher education, more generally, could use the concept of “collaborative planning” to achieve mutual success.
Abstract: This research project investigates whether co-located institutions, specifically, and competing institutions of higher education, more generally, could use the concept of “collaborative planning” to achieve mutual success. Collaborative planning is a conceptual framework from urban planning that emphasizes “partnership,stakeholder involvement, collaboration, and consensus-oriented decision-making” as core principles of planning (Vandenbussche, Edelenbos, and Eshuis 2017). It is an effective tool for transcending competition, negotiating disagreements, and achieving increased institutional collaboration and innovation.

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Published
November 30, 2018

The Traveling Mother

Navigating, visualizing and utilizing lactation spaces in US airports

An analysis of lactation spaces in US airports, led by one of the authors of the SCUP–Penn Nursing joint study of lactation policy and facilities in higher education. Originally published by Building and Environment journal.
Abstract: Breastfeeding has well-known health, economic and social benefits. As mothers continue to work, play, learn, travel and live their lives in all environments, the need for breastfeeding spaces continues to expand. However, a key detriment to engaging in safe and private breastfeeding is the lack of dedicated lactation space. While there have been regulatory strides to support nursing mothers, businesses and employers are not required to create a permanent and dedicated space for breastfeeding mothers. Little research has examined the essential building specifications of these spaces.

Airports are one of many environments that have been overlooked for requiring a lactation space. A total of 130 US airports, categorized by hub size and region, were analyzed for the following features: website source, photos, amenities description, and location/access. Findings conclude that while many airports are addressing the issue of mothers and breastfeeding, more could be done to provide quality accommodations.

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