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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
February 22, 2022

Getting in the eGame

Esports Streaming Gives the University of Kentucky a New Way to Grow Revenue and Recruit Students

The University of Kentucky understood the importance of technology in preparing students for the digital world. With public-private partnerships, it sought opportunities to be an industry leader in leveraging that capacity for its students, faculty, staff, and the community.

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: The University of Kentucky (UK) and the University of Kentucky Esports Club worked together to establish the University of Kentucky Esports Lounge. Students were surveyed on their gaming needs, and the resulting wish list (i.e., equipment selection, space configuration, furniture, etc.) fed into the decision-making process by all constituents. The project budget was derived by a larger construction project at the University that focused on student recruitment, community, and connection to the non-student demographic. The UK team ultimately planned and launched the custom facility to meet users’ particular needs—while finding a way for the University to produce an additional revenue stream.

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Webinar Recordings

Published
October 1, 2020

From Academic Program Decisions to Results

Building and Managing a Robust Program Portfolio

The decision-making process is only the beginning—how do you build a robust program portfolio in a way that ensures educational quality, financial sustainability, and meets the needs of your students? We will provide real-world examples of ways to effectively build quality online programs and courses that improve student access and retention, including performance metrics and faculty engagement.

This is part three of a three-part program series, “Integrated Planning to Build a Thriving Academic Program Portfolio.”

Abstract: This is part three of a three-part program series, “Integrated Planning to Build a Thriving Academic Program Portfolio.” These discussions will help you build a strategic and sustainable program portfolio that is mission-centered, data-informed, student-centered, and focused on growth opportunities.

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Webinar Recordings

Published
May 15, 2020

Transforming CSU Monterey Bay With the Living Community Challenge

California State University-Monterey Bay (CSU-MB) is the first university campus to register for the Living Community Challenge, becoming a model for how university campus design and planning can have a profound impact beyond the campus. We will discuss how our 2018 Architecture at Zero award-winning wellness and recreation design solution is transforming CSU-MB into a healthy, sustainable, net-positive environment.
Abstract: California State University-Monterey Bay (CSU-MB) is the first university campus to register for the Living Community Challenge, becoming a model for how university campus design and planning can have a profound impact beyond the campus. We will discuss how our 2018 Architecture at Zero award-winning wellness and recreation design solution is transforming CSU-MB into a healthy, sustainable, net-positive environment. Gain insight into the design solution's concepts, data, and final design that will help you develop strategies to improve the environment and quality of life on your campus.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2017

Mind and Body

Wellness Center Trends in U.S. Higher Education

Serving the needs of the whole person—mental health, medical care, recreation and fitness, and other services—is critical to both student and institutional success.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: Wellness—including mental health counseling, medical care, fitness and recreation, and other services—is now recognized as a crucial service for higher education institutions to provide to their students. This article discusses current trends in wellness centers at U.S. colleges and universities and challenges the reader to consider questions such as how campuses will meet increasing demands for mental health counseling. We describe how institutions are establishing best practices and building state-of-the-art facilities to serve the needs of the person as a whole. In preparation for renovation or new construction, we recommend that higher education professionals and architects implement a data-driven process to determine how best to serve the student population.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2017

Mens Sana in Corpore Sano

Planning for Health and Wellness as a Building Block of Academic Success

Campus planning that encourages a healthy lifestyle also augments scholastic achievement, improving grades and increasing graduation rates.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: Health and wellness centers that encourage all students to be active are replacing the traditional gymnasium complexes on campuses throughout the United States. Studies indicate that regular exercise helps students fight off depression, relieve stress, improve grades, and graduate on time. At Cabrini University, Wallace Roberts & Todd (WRT) architects designed an athletic pavilion that accommodates a wide variety of wellness, exercise, and fitness programs. WRT master planners used design principles that encourage physical activity to frame the campus reorganization so that all members of the campus community could incorporate healthy activity into their daily lives.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
January 1, 2017

The Creation of an Integrated Services Division to Advance University Strategic Initiatives

Combining the typically siloed services required to support the strategic work of universities into one department results in more effective integrated planning and institutional advancement.

From Volume 45 Number 2 | January–March 2017

Abstract: The services required to support the strategic work of universities often exist in silos, and this disconnection can impede the advancement of new initiatives. To prepare for a complex new program, a number of analytical processes need to occur—background research, environmental scans, and benchmarking. To develop the initiative, strong facilitation and project management skills are also required. To ensure the initiative’s success, careful space planning and financial planning must exist along with the development of evaluative measures to monitor progress. This article describes how one university combined these services into a single department to more effectively support the strategic work of schools, divisions, and campus-wide programs.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2013

Conversations With Central Administration

Facilitating Communication and Partnerships in New Program Development

Central administration is not creating curriculum; rather, it is encouraging the faculty to understand limitations and embrace broad institutional visions.

From Volume 41 Number 3 | March–May 2013

Abstract: The role of central administration in program development varies from institution to institution. Applications of shared governance, differences in state regulations, and evolving institutional procedures result in dissimilar administrative structures. This article reports on the role of central administration in new program development, as discussed by 13 senior academic officers at 12 public universities in the Carnegie Research Universities/Very High classification. The themes of fostering institutional communication and partnerships emerged in the interviews. In addition, the perceptions of the assistant provosts, associate provosts, and vice provosts responsible for the process are included.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2010

Distance Education

A University's Pioneering Master of Social Work Program Partnership with the U.S. Army

Learn how a partnership between Florida State and the US Army planned for and implemented tailored MSW degrees.

From Volume 38 Number 4 | July–September 2010

Abstract: In February 2008, the U.S. Army and Fayetteville State University established a partnership that has changed the process of healthcare education for active duty social workers. Before this time, the army relied on public universities to be solely responsible for recruiting, evaluating, and educating active duty social workers to serve the needs of service members and their families. However, to meet an immediate need for more social workers to deal with the wounds caused by the War on Terror and to help it get the best possible return on its educational investment, the army decided to partner with a university to establish a distance education Master of Social Work program at the Army Medical Department Center and School at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina was the university partner selected. This article outlines the background of the partnership and the issues other public universities should consider if they want to partner with the military or another federal agency. The article also highlights the benefits of such a partnership.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2008

Developing a Four-Year Baccalaureate Degree in Applied Psychology

Experiences in Degree Development at a Former Two-Year Postsecondary Institution

What does it take to plan for and move from a two-year to a four-year institution and implement a baccalaureate degree in applied psychology? Here’s how Kwantlen University College (BC) did it.

From Volume 36 Number 4 | July–September 2008

Abstract: What does it take to plan for and move from a two-year to a four-year institution and implement a baccalaureate degree in applied psychology? Here’s how Kwantlen University College (BC) did it.

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