SCUP
 

Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

FOUND 9 RESOURCES

REFINED BY:

  • Organization: University of Washington-Seattle CampusxLoyola University Chicagox

Clear All
ABSTRACT:  | 
SORT BY:  | 
Conference Recordings

Published
October 19, 2020

2020 North Central Regional Conference | October 2020

Loyola University

Intentional Partnerships for Livable and Resilient Campuses

Although unique in their practice and infrastructure challenges, Loyola University Chicago and Loyola University Medical Center used strategic partnerships, innovative planning solutions, and green infrastructure to create resilient, livable campuses. We’ll demonstrate how you can make tangible improvements and promote resiliency on your campus through green infrastructure.
Abstract: When properly planned in collaboration with municipal agencies, campus green infrastructure strategies promote resilience, sustainability, and livability as well as optimize campus stormwater management and drainage performance. Although unique in their practice and infrastructure challenges, Loyola University Chicago and Loyola University Medical Center used strategic partnerships, innovative planning solutions, and green infrastructure to create resilient, livable campuses. Investment in green infrastructure might seem like it has a limited impact, but through strategic partnerships and a comprehensive approach, we’ll demonstrate how you can make tangible improvements and promote resiliency on your campus through green infrastructure.

Member Price:
$35 | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Webinar Recordings

Published
September 17, 2020

Out of the Fire and Into the Future

Insights on Essential Planning Strategies Post COVID

The integrative process of short-term planning during the pandemic effectively brought together academic, financial, and physical planning, and presents a unique opportunity to continue work across traditional planning silos. Explore new planning modes being used during this crisis and their long-term application.
Abstract: Higher education has been responding in crisis mode since spring and racing toward an entirely new kind of academic year this fall. How can we turn this experience into productive new strategies for planning and leadership?

Existing siloed decision making would not have allowed for a successful response to the rapidly changing conditions brought on by the pandemic. The integrative process of short-term planning effectively brought together academic, financial, and physical planning, and presents a unique opportunity to continue work across traditional planning silos and modes of learning and living.

Member Price:
Free

Non-Member Price:
Free

Webinar Recordings

Published
June 8, 2020

Campuses Learning From Each Other

COVID-19 has left universities overwhelmed and struggling to rapidly shift to new ways of operating Focusing on the interactions between people, policy, facilities, and technology is more important than ever on campuses. Colleagues from Demographic Perspectives and Pirie Associates, in affiliation with SCUP, discussed the challenges, priorities, solutions, and opportunities to change the way campuses operate for the future.
Abstract: COVID-19 has left universities overwhelmed and struggling to rapidly shift to new ways of operating effectively. Focusing on the interactions between people, policy, facilities, and technology is more important than ever on higher education campuses. The short-term solutions colleges are now implementing need to be embraced as lessons for the long-term. What can we learn from others working in and with higher education? What are the challenges, priorities, and solutions and, where are the opportunities to change the way campuses operate for the future?

Member Price:
Free

Non-Member Price:
Free

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2018

Creating a Sense of Community on Urban College and University Campuses

Implications for Planning and Design

Urban campuses have unique planning and design challenges when it comes to creating a sense of place that reflects both their global ambitions and local commitments to a variety of stakeholders.

From Volume 47 Number 1 | October–December 2018

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Report

Published
January 1, 2018

P3 Performance for Higher Education

This is a SCUP Fellow Research Project Final Report for the 2016–2017 program. The researcher’s intention was to better understand P3 models and learn how they have performed, possibly generating some useful lessons for how P3 models can be applied with desired outcomes.
Abstract: Public-Private Partnership (“P3”) procurement models for built infrastructure serving higher learning institutions started to gain attention in North America in the late 1990s—mostly as an alternative approach to adding student housing at select universities and colleges. More recently, P3 models have been applied to a diverse range of higher learning projects, with some serving core academic and research functions.

Although many institutions are considering P3 approaches among their options to address emerging pressures to expand or update their facilities, their implementation is not yet common. The researcher’s intention was to better understand P3 models and learn how they have performed, possibly generating some useful lessons for how P3 models can be applied with desired outcomes.

Member Price:
Free

Non-Member Price:
Free

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2004

Research Space: Who Needs It, Who Gets It, Who Pays for It?

An overview of research space management in the United States, based on interviews with senior administrators, Internet documents, and the authors’ vast experience, identifies important trends that need attention.

From Volume 33 Number 1 | September–November 2004

Abstract: Today, the amount of space devoted to research at research universities exceeds that of classrooms and class laboratories. This research space portfolio presents important policy and management challenges. As stewards of this portfolio, universities must address issues of funding the construction of research facilities, equipping and maintaining them, allocating and accounting for space used for research, and managing, in broadest terms, the physical and administrative infrastructure in which research is conducted. As this article illustrates, managing the balance between the growing demand for and the supply of research space is complicated. To address the issues of research space, universities have developed a variety of space management methods to fit their unique research missions, priorities, and operational culture. This article provides important insights into this little studied aspect of higher education space planning. The article is an overview of research space management across the U. S. on general campuses and in health science centers. It is based on interviews with senior administrators in selected research universities conducted specifically for this study, information about research space management available on university documents on the Internet, and on the work of Ira Fink and Associates, Inc. in programming research facilities on a multitude of campuses nationwide.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 1, 2003

The Impact of Technologies on Learning

A study at the University of Washington called “Listening to the Learner, ” asked students about their desire for using technology in coursework, and facult about current approaches/barriers. Curricula were developed that intergrate education technology in a learner-centered way.

From Volume 32 Number 2 | December–February 2003

Abstract: Today’s college students believe that learning technologies are necessary tools that should be integrated into their course work. However, faculty have not yet responded to these expectations. This qualitative study engaged approximately 100 faculty and undergraduate students at the University of Washington in focus groups to explore this discrepancy between students’ desires to utilize technology and actual faculty integration of technology. Universities and colleges can resolve this digital disconnect by assisting in planning curricula to meet student and teacher needs, aligning support and services to technology adoption to overcome present barriers, and informing the design and development of educational technology.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2003

The Road Less Traveled: Sustainable Transportation for Campuses

The high costs of parking expansion have propelled many institutions toward a transportation demand management strategy to shift many trips from single occupant automobiles to other modes of travel.

From Volume 31 Number 3 | March–May 2003

Abstract: This article provides a survey of innovative approaches to campus transportation in the United States. The high costs of parking expansion have propelled many institutions toward a transportation demand management strategy, using parking pricing, transit passes for students and employees, and investment in bicycle infrastructure to shift many trips from single-occupant automobiles to other modes of travel. These institutions have experienced multiple benefits, including lower transportation costs, lower environmental impacts, and improved community relations.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 1999

New Learning Technologies: One Size Doesn’t Fit All

Technology must be flexible and adaptable to diverse teaching and learning needs.

From Volume 28 Number 1 | Fall 1999

Abstract: Describes the University of Washington’s attempt to support students and faculty in their access to and understanding of new information technology. Details a collaborative partnership among five administrative units to plan faculty support for the adaptation of new technologies for instructional purposes. Provides some guidelines for implementing technology support services for faculty, and details some of the obstacles the university met along the way.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access