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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 8, 2022

Seven Lessons in Inclusive Campus Design

Learn How the University of Kentucky Developed Its First DEI Facilities and Spaces Plan

Institutions are starting to grapple with histories of developing indigenous lands and the legacy of an able-bodied vernacular within campus design that continues to reinforce in-groups and out-groups.

From Volume 50 Number 3 | April–June 2022

Abstract: A global health crisis intersecting with a racial reckoning has led to a renewed commitment to reflect on complex histories and plan for more inclusive futures on many American campuses. Institutions, which benefitted from traditional hierarchies of power, are starting to grapple with histories of developing indigenous lands and the legacy of a western and able-bodied vernacular within campus design that continues to reinforce in-groups and out-groups. The authors are presently leading first-of-their-kind DEI planning initiatives; in this article they unpack how a public institution is meeting their past head-on to plan better futures.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
February 22, 2022

Getting in the eGame

Esports Streaming Gives the University of Kentucky a New Way to Grow Revenue and Recruit Students

The University of Kentucky understood the importance of technology in preparing students for the digital world. With public-private partnerships, it sought opportunities to be an industry leader in leveraging that capacity for its students, faculty, staff, and the community.

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: The University of Kentucky (UK) and the University of Kentucky Esports Club worked together to establish the University of Kentucky Esports Lounge. Students were surveyed on their gaming needs, and the resulting wish list (i.e., equipment selection, space configuration, furniture, etc.) fed into the decision-making process by all constituents. The project budget was derived by a larger construction project at the University that focused on student recruitment, community, and connection to the non-student demographic. The UK team ultimately planned and launched the custom facility to meet users’ particular needs—while finding a way for the University to produce an additional revenue stream.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 26, 2021

Space Jam

How to Accommodate Campus Events and Meetings This Fall

Much of the conversation around the return to campus this fall has focused on academic courses. But other events and meetings will also need to be accommodated.

From Volume 49 Number 4 | July–September 2021

Abstract: This article discusses an approach for campus meetings and events, such as study sessions, student group meetings, guest speaker presentations, etc., this coming academic year. It also aims to leverage the discussion about near-term needs to generate a more conceptual and flexible understanding of programming, space use, and virtual interaction within higher education.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
May 18, 2020

Telling the Untold Stories

George Mason University Frames the Conversation Around Its Institutional Namesake and His Legacy

Through historical study, outreach, and education, undergraduate students at George Mason University began research that developed into the Enslaved Children of George Mason Project. The goal was to broaden the university narrative, encourage discussion about American ideals of equality and freedom, and transform a complex historical legacy and memorial into an inclusive campus place for reflection and dialogue.

From Volume 48 Number 3 | April–June 2020

Abstract: This article discusses the processes and outcomes of recent efforts at George Mason University (GMU) to acknowledge and celebrate the lives of those individuals enslaved by the institution’s namesake. In an era of intense debate surrounding the legacies of historical figures in the United States, GMU seeks to set the example for one approach to dealing with the conversations: community-fostering dialogue. We discuss the use of sculptural elements to create a new monument that sits in discourse with an existing statue of George Mason IV, highlighting how undergraduate student research efforts can be leveraged to address topics of value to today’s campus communities.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2019

Relic or Relevant

Is Stanford University’s Main Quad Still a Place for Community Engagement?

The university’s founders specified that the space that would become the Main Quad, along with its buildings, should facilitate human discourse and connection. Has it reached across generations to remain an active place for student life?

From Volume 48 Number 1 | October–December 2019

Abstract: The quadrangle is a medieval-European legacy adapted by American universities during the nineteenth century. Given technological advances and changes in society, is the nineteenth-century icon changing? Will the American campus look different in the future? With a selected group of students, faculty, alumni, and staff, we discussed the relevance—past, present, and future—of Stanford University’s Main Quadrangle—as a venue for discourse and community engagement. Despite it being a relic, we concluded that the Main Quad continues to be the heart of the Stanford campus community.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2018

Enhancing the Student Experience Through Placemaking

Georgia Tech’s West Village Dining Commons

Students thrive in authentic, multifunctional spaces that foster both individual reflection and social interaction and further the connection between place and the human experience.

From Volume 46 Number 4 | July–September 2018

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
January 1, 2018

College Campus Landscapes Within a Learning Ecosystem

College campus landscapes may help restore student attentional capacity for learning when intentionally viewed as educational resources or integrated with academic content.

From Volume 46 Number 2 | January–March 2018

Abstract: College campus landscapes are touted as symbols of “greenness,” displaying trees, vegetation, and flowering bushes for aesthetic appeal. Features such as a lawn to sit on between classes or a tree to gather under for course sessions may collectively and purposefully enhance student capacity for cognitive functioning and information processing or, simply, “learning.” In a place of learning where virtual environments and campus landscapes coexist, attention is an essential element of perceptual and cognitive operations. A key goal of the study described in this article is to better understand how to leverage regular and purposeful interactions with campus landscapes to help restore student attentional capacity for learning.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2016

Designing Innovative Campuses for Tomorrow’s Students

Campus design and architecture will be the prime catalysts for transforming universities into our society’s engines of growth.

From Volume 44 Number 4 | July–September 2016

Abstract: “Designing Innovative Campuses For Tomorrow’s Students” explores increasing investment by higher education institutions in new programs and facilities that boost on-campus innovation and entrepreneurship. This trend is a response, in part, to the changing expectations and demands of Millennial and Generation Z students and their future employers. The impact of this movement, though, goes far beyond those constituencies—changing everything from campus housing to the economic development role of higher education institutions. The examples of Clemson University’s Watt Family Innovation Center and the University of Florida’s Infinity Hall are provided to illustrate the scope of influence and success of these changes.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2014

Enhancing Campus Sustainability Through SITES and Socially Equitable Design

The Socially Equitable category represents a unique and often missed opportunity for academic institutions to further their commitment to sustainable practices.

From Volume 42 Number 4 | July–September 2014

Abstract: Sustainability guidelines for campuses typically focus on the environmental, structural, and organizational aspects of colleges and universities. The Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES) expands the definition of campus sustainability by including “Socially Equitable” design guidelines that consider how people interact with and within campus landscapes. Landscapes that afford (1) mental restoration and (2) social interaction become sustainable under the SITES definition. This study conducted at Agnes Scott College and The University of Georgia tests the criteria associated with these guidelines to determine their relevance and impact. Through mapping exercises, direct observation, and a questionnaire survey, data were collected from 120 students to determine which “sustainable” criteria are relevant to campus landscapes. The findings confirm the criteria listed in the SITES guidelines and introduce additional criteria to consider for enhancing Socially Equitable design standards on campus.

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