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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Example Plans

Published
February 23, 2022

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Example Plans

Published
February 2, 2022

Example Plan

This short-duration strategic framework describes goals and very specific action steps to guide the institution through the current, globally tumultuous era.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
January 19, 2022

Partnerships Promote Inclusion

A university and a secondary school collaborate to decrease dropout rates and increase college enrollment

Intentional planning and a competency-based, personalized learning model empowers graduate students from the architecture discipline to assist secondary students in becoming knowledge seekers and design professionals.

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: American industries, professional organizations, individual companies, and higher education institutions continue to struggle to attract employees from underrepresented populations. Future-forward thinking is required to ensure a multicultural workforce. The authors, a design educator at a predominantly white, Midwestern university, and a high school principal at a multicultural urban school district, developed an intentional collaboration—partnerships between secondary and postsecondary institutions—to bridge the gap. In this article, they share strategies they developed for recruiting and retaining underrepresented students through intentional planning and design of competency-based, personalized learning models.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 10, 2021

Book Review: Broke

The Racial Consequences of Underfunding Public Universities

From Volume 50 Number 1 | October–December 2021

Abstract: by Laura T. Hamilton and Kelly Nielsen
The University of Chicago Press
294 pages
ISBN-13: 978-0-226-60540-1 (cloth)
ISBN-13:978-0-226-74745-3 (paper)
ISBN-13: 978-0-226-74759 (e-book)

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
October 26, 2021

2021 North Central Regional Conference | October 2021

This resource is available to conference registrants only.

Engaging Faculty and Industry to Increase Workforce Capacity

In this session, you'll learn how you can enhance awareness of untapped populations to meet industry goals, evaluate opportunities to improve growth outcomes, and grow industry sponsorship investment through academic and equipment planning at your institution.
Abstract: Higher education must be observant to remain relevant. Institutional leadership and faculty can help close the workforce capacity gap by making meaningful connections with prospective students, the workforce, and industry partners. Metropolitan Community College (MCC) is changing their pipeline to increase workforce capacity by engaging nontraditional students in addition to re-evaluating academic and physical availability on their campus. In this session, you'll learn how you can enhance awareness of untapped populations to meet industry goals, evaluate opportunities to improve growth outcomes, and grow industry sponsorship investment through academic and equipment planning at your institution.

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Webinar Recordings

Published
April 27, 2021

The Art and Science of Supporting Adult Learners

Actionable Steps & Strategies

More than ever, nontraditional students and adult learners are making up more and more of the student body at colleges and universities across the country. Learn how to effectively stand out from other institutions who are making mistakes in 10 key areas with the adult learner population.
Abstract: This was a free webinar hosted by CAEL, AASCU, and SCUP.

Students over the age of 25 are the fastest-growing segment in higher education. From 2000 to 2012, the enrollment of students over the age of 25 increased by 35%, and between 2012 and 2019, the share of students over age 25 increased by another 23%.

Even though more adult learners and nontraditional students are enrolling in higher education, many institutional practices do not consider the unique needs of this population. The best adult learner strategies not only increase student satisfaction, they improve enrollment rates and adult degree attainment.

More than ever, nontraditional students and adult learners are making up more and more of the student body at colleges and universities across the country. Institutions can create equitable pathways that can help overcome disparities in adult learning, and better prepare themselves for adult students who have been disconnected from higher education.

Learn how to effectively stand out from other institutions who are making mistakes in 10 key areas with the adult learner population.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 26, 2021

Keep on Keepin’ on

Customized Retention Practices Helped Low Income and Single Mom Students to Persist

A support program for low-income and/or single-mother students to improve their persistence and retention was revisited 15 years after it had been launched at Charter Oak State College. Did follow-up with the graduates show that the effort had aided the former participants in obtaining their college degree? Had the collaboration between the institution’s Academic Services, Enrollment Management, and Financial Aid departments—and the support they offered—help the students to persevere? Based on survey results, was the program still of value, and what improvements needed to be made?

From Volume 49 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: This article is based on follow-up survey research from a doctoral case study that highlighted effective retention practices for low-income and/or single mothers who were students within the Women in Transition (WIT) program at Charter Oak State College. The concept of retention in this instance is an enrollment management practice aimed at maintaining a student population while aiding the institution in sustaining organizational success. Emphasis is placed on the retention concepts of social and academic integration that enabled the specific population to persist and succeed.

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Webinar Recordings

Published
March 2, 2021

How to Create a Secondary-Postsecondary Partnership to Promote Diversity, Inclusion, and Underrepresented Populations in Higher Education

This webinar will focus on how to develop a secondary-postsecondary partnership to intentionally promote diversity, inclusion, and recognition of under-represented populations through collaboration and integrated planning strategies. The presenters will share their goals and project planning for a competency-based, project-based learning model—with an emphasis on mentoring.
Abstract: Institutions of higher learning and professional firms report concerns about lack of diversity in the workplace. Intentional partnerships can help bridge this gap. This webinar will focus on how to develop a secondary-postsecondary partnership to intentionally promote diversity, inclusion, and recognition of under-represented populations through collaboration and integrated planning strategies.

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Conference Recordings

Published
October 19, 2020

2020 North Central Regional Conference | October 2020

Making Colleges Student Ready

It’s About Time!

We will share a tool we developed through the National Institutes for Historically-Underserved Students for institutions to assess their readiness to support underserved students. In this session, you will learn about this tool and the detailed survey of relevant research that went into its development as well as discover how you can employ this tool on your campus.
Abstract: Equity and inclusion on campus has never been more important and institutions must come to terms with their current practices in order to improve them. We will share a tool we developed through the National Institutes for Historically-Underserved Students for institutions to assess their readiness to support underserved students. A detailed survey of relevant research went into the development of this readiness tool. In this session, you will learn about this tool and the detailed survey of relevant research that went into its development as well as discover how you can employ this tool on your campus.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 15, 2020

Is Higher Education Ready for Its Learners?

Impact Student Success Using the Three-Box Solution

With sweeping shifts in recruitment and retention of students throughout higher education, Northern Kentucky University committed to a pivot. Its new student framework emphasizes student support and academic delivery driven by strategic decisions and data rather than by impulsivity. Their Success by Design framework encouraged innovations that focused the university on meeting learners where they were.

From Volume 48 Number 3 | April–June 2020

Abstract: Northern Kentucky University (NKU) used an expedited and focused strategic planning process by applying Govindarajan’s (2016) Three-Box Solution to simultaneously manage the past, present, and future. A Core Team, supported by multiple resource teams consisting of representatives from all NKU constituencies, gathered input from nearly 2,000 stakeholders. The resulting Success by Design strategic framework concentrated solely on student success. This article describes the ongoing, iterative approach and offers recommendations for those seeking to develop widespread buy-in and unleash the innovative spirit needed to make their institutions more student-ready.

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