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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Conference Recordings

Published
October 27, 2021

Keynote | STEM Continuum

Education to Industry

This keynote panel is a collaborative exploration of forward-thinking strategies for STEM outreach, education, and application.
Abstract:

This keynote panel is a collaborative exploration of forward-thinking strategies for STEM outreach, education, and application. Come join the panelists for an engaging discussion about their current experience in building and running facilities in K-12 schools, higher education, and industry as well as how their strategies for flexibility are bridging these different phases in the STEM continuum.

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Report

Published
November 23, 2020

The Connected Campus

Building Long-Term Value and Agility by Connecting Offerings, Organizations and Operations

Campus environments play a vital role in student success. By making changes to their combination of spaces, institutions can respond to the shifts transforming higher education. Elliot Felix shares how colleges and universities can prepare for a more blended world by bringing together the digital and physical, enabling greater diversity and inclusion, and implementing flexible structures, staffing, space, and services. Sponsored Content: Knoll and brightspot strategy.
Abstract: Historic separations that defined higher education are dissolving: research is more interdisciplinary, online and on-campus learning are converging, wet and dry labs are blending, teaching and research overlap, and academia forges relationships with corporate partners. Institutions, by improving how they connect what they offer, how they are organized, and how they operate, can build value and agility to better assist their people on campus. Real-world examples in this white paper from Knoll and brightspot strategy discuss how campus spaces support student success, including how to fully use the campus; creating spaces that sustain diverse and flexible ways of working; thinking phygitally; and creating environments where today’s purpose-driven and entrepreneurial students (Gen Z) will thrive as they prepare to enter the workforce.

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Blog

Published
February 28, 2020

Planning for: Allergen-Free Dining

Nearly half of all college students today avoid at least one food allergen, according to a report listed in our Spring 2020 issue of Trends in Higher Education. As the number of students with disclosed food allergies continues to rise, allergen-free dining has become a key consideration in creating a healthy and inclusive campus—as well as in recruitment and retention efforts. Recently, Michigan State University opened an allergen-free dining hall on its campus called Thrive. We caught up with Gina Keilen, Registered Dietitian, Culinary Services, at Michigan State to learn more about the planning process and how her team’s efforts are positively impacting the campus community.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
October 28, 2019

2019 North Central Regional Conference | October 2019

The University as Neighborhood Builder

Leading an Integrated Process

We will show you how to see your institution's land from a new perspective, apply fresh ideas about mixed-use campus space, and use an integrated planning process to build consensus in times of change.
Abstract: This session will discuss how Michigan State University re-envisioned 140 acres through an integrated planning and exploratory design process that required continual adaptation. When building a vision for large land parcel redevelopment as a mixed-use, vibrant district, it is important to have an adaptive planning process with strong leadership and inclusive dialogue. We will show you how to see your institution's land from a new perspective, apply fresh ideas about mixed-use campus space, and use an integrated planning process to build consensus in times of change.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

Ensuring Research Resilience Through Programmatic and Facilities Alignment

Abstract: Interdisciplinary scientific research is the new normal in academia. Campus planning for interdisciplinary research requires special tools and analytics that align the needs of increasingly diverse research environments with existing facilities capabilities and new characterizations of research neighborhoods. To remain relevant within the world-wide scientific community, campuses must free research space planning from traditional boundaries in order to promote collaborative synergies. This session will introduce new analytical assessment tools, organizational principles, and planning strategies supporting interdisciplinary research. Come learn how to create an open-ended, actionable, and living planning document that ensures long-term relevance and viability.

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Partner Content

Published
April 1, 2019

Permeability by Design

Fostering flow, creating connectivity, promoting creative solutions.

Permeable spaces invite people in, encourage use, are flexible and memorable, and allow coming and going. You can infuse permeability into almost any learning space. Read how three campuses (Texas A&M University Campus, Clemson University, and University of Calgary) are using permeability in their emerging design elements.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
January 1, 2019

Land-Grant Campuses for the 21st Century

Moving Beyond Rural and Semi-Rural Sites

To address new population groups and respond to today’s challenges, these institutions plan spaces that also welcome urban, suburban, and remote students.

From Volume 47 Number 2 | January–March 2019

Abstract: Over their 150-year history, land-grant universities have played a tremendous and vital role in the development of the United States and the education of its people. Most of these institutions were established as the result of the Morrill Land-Grant Act of 1862. How has this mission, drafted in a much different time, held up over the years? As we move toward the third decade of the twenty-first century, many universities are evolving to better embrace changing student demographics; build industry partnerships; and reframe campus legacies to ensure that the land-grant mission still supports the needs of our times.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2004

Solving Campus Parking Shortages: New Solutions for an Old Problem

Recent major enrollment and construction trends on campus mean that, once again, the demand for parking is increasing at the same time as supply is being eroded. Universities and colleges, however, are able to achieve more integrated parking and transportation policies than are other large institutions.

From Volume 33 Number 1 | September–November 2004

Abstract: Universities and colleges across the country are faced with growth in the campus population and the loss of surface parking lots for new buildings. The response of many institutions is to build new garages with the assumption that parking demand ratios will remain the same. Such an approach, however, can be extremely expensive—upwards of $2,000 per net new space annually. In many cases, a mix of parking and demand reduction programs—such as shuttles, bicycle and pedestrian improvements, and financial incentives not to drive—can accommodate growth at a lower cost per trip. A balanced approach will also tend to support other goals, from improving town-gown relations to maintaining debt capacity. Demand management strategies have been employed by institutions for many years. However, it is less common for a cost-benefit analysis to be undertaken comparing them with new parking construction. Using examples from universities in California and Colorado, this article demonstrates a methodology to inform basic decisions on the amount of parking required to cater to campus growth, which can be incorporated into campus master planning.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 1, 2002

Implementing the Strategic Plan

The biggest challenge in planning is making the plan work!

From Volume 30 Number 4 | Summer 2002

Abstract: One of the major issues in strategic planning is moving the academic strategic plan from planning to implementation. This article suggests that there are several effective implementation methods: using the budget, using participation, using force, establishing goals and key performance indicators, working within the human resource management system, using the reward system, using faculty and staff development, working with institutional culture, working with or around tradition, developing and using change champions, and building on systems that are ready for or are easily adaptable to strategic change.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 1, 2002

Recruiting and Retaining a Diverse Faculty

Despite efforts to alleviate problems associated with women and minority recruitment and retention, problems still exist, as shown in a review of current literature and a survey of selected institutions.

From Volume 30 Number 4 | Summer 2002

Abstract: Recruiting and retaining women and minority faculty members is a particularly challenging workforce development issue facing many universities. This article summarizes current literature and the results of a survey of selected institutions to gauge responses to this challenge. All the survey respondents indicated that recruitment of women and minority candidates has been problematic, that retention problems vary, and that job placement is difficult and can negatively influence the recruitment and retention of women and minority faculty members. Job placement for partners has been most difficult for those universities located in small- to mid-sized cities. A variety of programs have been attempted to alleviate problems of recruitment and retention.

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