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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
February 25, 2022

Fully Engaged

Integrated Planning Was Leveraged to Optimize Community Participation in the University of California, Berkeley’s Campus Master Plan

The most effective master plans are those that reflect the myriad voices of the institution. Engagement should be informative, inclusive, meaningful, and fun—and should be the product of an integrated process.

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: The most effective master plans are those that reflect the myriad voices of the institution. We’re finding the engagement process is fast becoming as important a product of the plan as the plan itself. Engagement should be informative, inclusive, meaningful, and fun—and should be the product of an integrated process. Leveraging the University of California, Berkeley’s Campus Master Plan as a case study, this article provides a framework for developing custom engagement strategies, and highlights examples, lessons learned, and tips for optimizing meaningful participation.

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Webinar Recordings

Published
August 20, 2020

Creating a More Adaptive Institution in the Wake of COVID-19

This interactive panel discussion will bring together different institutions’ perspectives from facilities, technology, student services, and finance to understand the impact of COVID-19 on institutions and their student experience. The discussion will be organized in three parts, each with a prompt to inform the discussion, a poll to take the pulse of the audience, and an open discussion among panelists.
Abstract: How can colleges and universities become more adaptive in the wake of COVID-19? This interactive panel discussion will bring together different institutions’ perspectives from facilities, technology, student services, and finance to understand the impact of COVID-19 on institutions and their student experience.

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Free

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Conference Recordings

Published
August 14, 2020

2020 Pacific Regional Conference | August–October 2020

Where are We? Where Do We Go?

Moving from Reactivity to Creativity During COVID

This session will explore the core issues, challenges, and opportunities that are shaping higher education and uncover the breadth of adaptation that institutions must undertake in this time of disruption.
Abstract: Institutions are adapting their strategic plans, layering the impacts of technology, and thinking towards the future during the COVID-19 pandemic. In order to provide students with a quality education, institutions must learn, test, and implement changes quickly. This session will explore the core issues, challenges, and opportunities that are shaping higher education and uncover the breadth of adaptation that institutions must undertake in this time of disruption. Come learn how to better prepare to meet your institution’s current needs and future challenges by sharing implementable ideas and insights with your peers.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
March 27, 2019

2019 Pacific Regional Conference | March 2019

Throw Out Your Books

Designing Libraries for Their New Roles

This session will use recent library projects to study the effect of major program shifts on student behavior and discourse.
Abstract: Designing libraries based on student experience rather than book storage provides the potential to cater to a wider variety of students and learning styles, transforming libraries from an afterthought for prospective students to an asset for recruitment. This session will use recent library projects to study the effect of major program shifts on student behavior and discourse. We will look at both larger capital improvement projects and “small wins” that can be readily executed.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2018

The University of California

Creating, Nurturing, and Maintaining Academic Quality in a Public University Setting

From Volume 47 Number 1 | October–December 2018

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
January 1, 2018

An Exploration of Administrative Bloat in American Higher Education

Administrative bloat, the ballooning growth of administrative functions and personnel in U.S. higher education, is the unintended consequence of several factors and can be mitigated to some extent through deliberate strategies.

From Volume 46 Number 2 | January–March 2018

Abstract: This article evaluates administrative bloat, the ballooning growth of administrative functions and personnel, in American higher education. This evaluation was undertaken through a review of the available literature describing administrative bloat. Though unintentional, increased spending and government requirements for accountability may have contributed to overall growth and cost in higher education. Similarly, the changing composition of faculty—in terms of tenure-track faculty, annual contracts, and adjunct faculty—may have also played a role in the increased influence that administration has over campus policy and curricular decisions. Strategies to mitigate the cost of administrative bloat and to balance campus decisions between faculty and administration are suggested.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2004

Research Space: Who Needs It, Who Gets It, Who Pays for It?

An overview of research space management in the United States, based on interviews with senior administrators, Internet documents, and the authors’ vast experience, identifies important trends that need attention.

From Volume 33 Number 1 | September–November 2004

Abstract: Today, the amount of space devoted to research at research universities exceeds that of classrooms and class laboratories. This research space portfolio presents important policy and management challenges. As stewards of this portfolio, universities must address issues of funding the construction of research facilities, equipping and maintaining them, allocating and accounting for space used for research, and managing, in broadest terms, the physical and administrative infrastructure in which research is conducted. As this article illustrates, managing the balance between the growing demand for and the supply of research space is complicated. To address the issues of research space, universities have developed a variety of space management methods to fit their unique research missions, priorities, and operational culture. This article provides important insights into this little studied aspect of higher education space planning. The article is an overview of research space management across the U. S. on general campuses and in health science centers. It is based on interviews with senior administrators in selected research universities conducted specifically for this study, information about research space management available on university documents on the Internet, and on the work of Ira Fink and Associates, Inc. in programming research facilities on a multitude of campuses nationwide.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2000

Portraits of Students: A Retrospective

A tour of the past 30 years of student trends highlights the challenge of change.

From Volume 29 Number 1 | Fall 2000

Abstract: In this article, the author reviews 60 articles about students that were published between 1969 and 1999. She identifies five distinctive galleries of student portraits as they were revealed in the writings of authors over the 30-year period. Galleries visited and analyzed for their impact on higher education are Student Protest, Open Admissions, Diversity, Lifelong Learning, and Student as Consumer.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 1999

Benchmarking: A New Approach to Space Planning

An alternative approach uses space benchmarking and faculty head count for predicting space needs.

From Volume 27 Number 3 | Spring 1999

Abstract: Examines traditional assumptions underlying space management and proposes an alternative approach to projecting space use. Specifically, the author recommends making projections based on space per faculty rather than space per student, and then comparing these projections with the space allocation at peer institutions. Problems with traditional methods of space allocation are discussed, as is the process of implementing this approach and identifying comparable institutions.

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