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Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Published
June 24, 2021

Libraries in Shaping the Future of Higher Education

Part Two: Library Support for Equitable Access to Knowledge

In a climate of anti-intellectualism, institutions of higher education remain committed to making knowledge accessible and translating research to help solve society’s pressing challenges. Libraries have long served as stewards of research publications and creative academic output, facilitating access. How are they serving both as advisors to help scholars and students be more productive in accessing and utilizing scholarship throughout the research cycle, and as institutional partners to ensure their university’s research output is globally findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable towards the aim of greater open access, and impact?

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Published
June 22, 2021

Libraries in Shaping the Future of Higher Education

Part One: Libraries’ Leadership in Transforming Student Success

How can institutions leverage librarians as educational partners, complementing the classroom experience, to ensure students from all walks of life have a strong net of academic support?
Abstract: With societal inequalities in high relief, exacerbated by the pandemic and with lasting effect for many students, institutions must seek novel ways to meet needs and support success. This requires more concerted efforts to mitigate, and ensure we do not perpetuate, the barriers students face. How can institutions leverage librarians as educational partners, complementing the classroom experience, to ensure students from all walks of life have a strong net of academic support?

This is part one of a three-part webinar series.

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Published
April 27, 2021

The Art and Science of Supporting Adult Learners

Actionable Steps & Strategies

More than ever, nontraditional students and adult learners are making up more and more of the student body at colleges and universities across the country. Learn how to effectively stand out from other institutions who are making mistakes in 10 key areas with the adult learner population.
Abstract: This was a free webinar hosted by CAEL, AASCU, and SCUP.

Students over the age of 25 are the fastest-growing segment in higher education. From 2000 to 2012, the enrollment of students over the age of 25 increased by 35%, and between 2012 and 2019, the share of students over age 25 increased by another 23%.

Even though more adult learners and nontraditional students are enrolling in higher education, many institutional practices do not consider the unique needs of this population. The best adult learner strategies not only increase student satisfaction, they improve enrollment rates and adult degree attainment.

More than ever, nontraditional students and adult learners are making up more and more of the student body at colleges and universities across the country. Institutions can create equitable pathways that can help overcome disparities in adult learning, and better prepare themselves for adult students who have been disconnected from higher education.

Learn how to effectively stand out from other institutions who are making mistakes in 10 key areas with the adult learner population.

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Published
January 14, 2021

The Faculty Factor

Creating Buy-In for Difficult Planning

In this sessino we explore the successes and failures involved in two planning initiatives that required broad-based faculty support in order to reverse issues with programmatic quality, student success, and institutional accreditation.
Abstract: In difficult times, planning and the successful implementation of that planning require the buy-in and support of a whole range of stakeholders–but particularly the faculty, since they carry out the institution’s teaching and research missions.

Faculty can make or break successful planning.

An institution must be very circumspect in their choice of representative faculty for planning groups, how they are engaged in the planning process, and how they interact with other campus constituencies for maximum buy-in. This endeavor is particularly difficult when the new planning process follows previous attempts that have failed because of faculty resistance or lack of meaningful involvement. This session details successful planning initiatives at two regional universities, one in the Midwest and one in the southern Northeast, where earlier planning efforts failed because of “the faculty factor.”

Join us to explore the successes and failures involved in these two planning initiatives that required broad-based faculty support in order to reverse issues with programmatic quality, student success, and institutional accreditation.

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Published
April 21, 2021

Re-imagining Space Utilization

Engage with Ohio University’s ambitious approach to right-sizing and aligning physical space to programmatic needs. If you are entertaining radical change, this session will help you understand where to start, how to deliver in practice, and how to identify and express impacts that are mission-aligned to gain stakeholder buy-in.
Abstract: Engage with Ohio University’s ambitious approach to right-sizing and aligning physical space to programmatic needs. If you are entertaining radical change, this session will help you understand where to start, how to deliver in practice, and how to identify and express impacts that are mission-aligned to gain stakeholder buy-in.

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Nonmember Price: $69

Published
April 20, 2021

A Different Kind of SMART

Using Performance-Oriented Metrics to Redefine Success in a Forward-Focused Research Lab

In this presentation, we discuss how to identify and select appropriate metrics—equally focused on education and research—for evaluating “SMART” research laboratories.
Abstract: “SMART” built environments usually refer to buildings with embedded technologies that allow them to run as efficiently as possible. Yet for research institutions, that definition should be expanded beyond efficiency to include metrics that are used to quantify research productivity and accomplishments. The expected useful life of the building and individual labs, research dollars generated per square foot, intellectual property generated, and successful recruitment and retainment of researchers are but a few bottom line-oriented measures that colleges and universities use. By embracing the business side of higher education, architects can create even smarter built environments.

In this presentation, we discuss how to identify and select appropriate metrics for institutions that are equally focused on education and research. What objective and subjective measures can be considered? Are these metrics applicable in our new (hopefully) post-COVID reality? How are institutions reallocating space in this new reality? How do we redefine the future of “smart” higher education research facilities?

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Published
March 2, 2021

How to Create a Secondary-Postsecondary Partnership to Promote Diversity, Inclusion, and Underrepresented Populations in Higher Education

This webinar will focus on how to develop a secondary-postsecondary partnership to intentionally promote diversity, inclusion, and recognition of under-represented populations through collaboration and integrated planning strategies. The presenters will share their goals and project planning for a competency-based, project-based learning model—with an emphasis on mentoring.
Abstract: Institutions of higher learning and professional firms report concerns about lack of diversity in the workplace. Intentional partnerships can help bridge this gap. This webinar will focus on how to develop a secondary-postsecondary partnership to intentionally promote diversity, inclusion, and recognition of under-represented populations through collaboration and integrated planning strategies.

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Published
January 19, 2021

Unleashing the Power of Difference

Creating Neuro-Inclusive Learning Spaces

We live in a neurodiverse world. Spaces that support sensory needs can allow a wider range of students to flourish, creating a more equitable—and more flexible—environment. Leaders from Thomas Jefferson University and Verona Carpenter Architects will share examples across typologies of innovative solutions, unleashing the generative power of difference.
Abstract: We live in a neurodiverse world. Students, whether or not they have formal diagnoses, learn in different ways, and the converging crises of our day demand new paradigms of inclusion across the campus. Spaces that support sensory needs can allow a wider range of students to flourish, creating a more equitable—and more flexible—environment.

Leaders from Thomas Jefferson University and Verona Carpenter Architects will share examples across typologies of innovative solutions, unleashing the generative power of difference. Use the examples and discussion points to create a healthier, more attractive space on campus for all learning types.

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Published
January 13, 2021

Why Integrated Planning?

Building Capacity Across Institutional Boundaries

This partnered webinar by SCUP, NACAS, and ACUHO-I examines how using the SCUP Integrated Planning Model—a strategic and operational planning process tailored for the complexities and challenges of institutions of higher education—will help you create a solid foundation at your institution for planning for both the short- and long-term.
Abstract: Bring up the topic of strategic planning and you often get a lot of pained looks and audible groans. Some may recount an experience where a lot of time and resources went into producing a glossy document that sits on someone’s shelf. It doesn’t need to be this way. There is an alternative: integrated planning. Integrated planning engages all areas of an institution to work together toward a common vision. Done well, it is not a one-time event but a durable framework to create the infrastructure for institutional thriving. When optimized, integrated planning links resources, processes, and people with an institution’s mission, vision, and core values.

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Published
August 2, 2021

Passive House Design and Residence Halls

The Perfect Pairing

The session will discuss the basics of Passive House (PH) design, how it can both save energy and improve the quality of the interior environment. The presenters will illustrate how Passive House design has been incorporated from both a design and administrative standpoint at the new residence hall at the University of Toronto Scarborough.
Abstract: Discover how Passive House design was incorporated into the design of UTSC’s 750-bed residence hall and dining facility; helping the University to meet its sustainability and health & wellness goals. Embracing this high-performance design protocol for student residences of any size will align three goals for any campus: sustainability, student health, and bottom-line financial performance.

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