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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Published
June 26, 2020

Voices from the Field: Episode #16

Helping Vulnerable Students Meet Basic Needs

From The Hope Center at Temple University, Paula Umaña discusses caring and communication: the need to identify your most vulnerable students, then ensure that available assistance is visible and easy for them to access.
Abstract: Students need more than hand sanitizing stations and plexiglass. They need their basic needs addressed. Many college students are part of a vulnerable population with a fragile hold on basic needs like housing, food, and transportation. Temple University’s Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice compiled an extensive set of resources for institutions to use to assist students in locating and applying for necessary aid.

In this episode, The Hope Center’s Paula Umaña discusses caring and communication: the need to identify your most vulnerable students, then ensure that available assistance is visible and easy for them to access..

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Published
February 28, 2020

Planning for: Allergen-Free Dining

Nearly half of all college students today avoid at least one food allergen, according to a report listed in our Spring 2020 issue of Trends in Higher Education. As the number of students with disclosed food allergies continues to rise, allergen-free dining has become a key consideration in creating a healthy and inclusive campus—as well as in recruitment and retention efforts. Recently, Michigan State University opened an allergen-free dining hall on its campus called Thrive. We caught up with Gina Keilen, Registered Dietitian, Culinary Services, at Michigan State to learn more about the planning process and how her team’s efforts are positively impacting the campus community.

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Delivered
October 28, 2019

2019 North Central Regional Conference | October 2019

Integrating Security With Wellness and Biophilic Design

Illustrating the latest security, wellness, and biophilic design integration strategies, this session will provide you with essential tools for evaluating both prospective designs and existing conditions on your campus.
Abstract: Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) and biophilic design principles may often seem at odds, but great ideas for integrating security and wellness for your facilities may come from unexpected sources...as long as you engage users early on in planning and design. Illustrating the latest security, wellness, and biophilic design integration strategies, this session will provide you with essential tools for evaluating both prospective designs and existing conditions on your campus.

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Mens Sana in Corpore Sano

Planning for Health and Wellness as a Building Block of Academic Success

Campus planning that encourages a healthy lifestyle also augments scholastic achievement, improving grades and increasing graduation rates.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: Health and wellness centers that encourage all students to be active are replacing the traditional gymnasium complexes on campuses throughout the United States. Studies indicate that regular exercise helps students fight off depression, relieve stress, improve grades, and graduate on time. At Cabrini University, Wallace Roberts & Todd (WRT) architects designed an athletic pavilion that accommodates a wide variety of wellness, exercise, and fitness programs. WRT master planners used design principles that encourage physical activity to frame the campus reorganization so that all members of the campus community could incorporate healthy activity into their daily lives.

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Mind and Body

Wellness Center Trends in U.S. Higher Education

Serving the needs of the whole person—mental health, medical care, recreation and fitness, and other services—is critical to both student and institutional success.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: Wellness—including mental health counseling, medical care, fitness and recreation, and other services—is now recognized as a crucial service for higher education institutions to provide to their students. This article discusses current trends in wellness centers at U.S. colleges and universities and challenges the reader to consider questions such as how campuses will meet increasing demands for mental health counseling. We describe how institutions are establishing best practices and building state-of-the-art facilities to serve the needs of the person as a whole. In preparation for renovation or new construction, we recommend that higher education professionals and architects implement a data-driven process to determine how best to serve the student population.

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“Menus That Matter” at the Heart of Kalamazoo Valley Community College’s Bronson Healthy Living Campus

Culinary and food professionals can serve as positive change agents in society.

From Volume 45 Number 1 | October–December 2016

Abstract: We live at a time when increasing numbers of Americans consume food prepared away from home. This trend, along with poor dietary choices and lack of access to healthy, sustainably sourced food, contributes to a reduced quality of life and the onset of preventable disease.
The Culinary Arts and Sustainable Food Systems curriculum recently approved by the Kalamazoo Valley Community College trustees reflects the college’s belief that best practices in urban agriculture, the latest developments in culinary and food production research and technology, and the transformative power of education will improve the health and well-being of our citizens and help sustain our communities. The college believes that culinary and food professionals can serve as positive change agents in society.

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