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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
March 20, 2019

2019 Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2019

Innovative Data Tools That Support Capital and Facilities Planning

In this session, we will discuss data strategies for capital and facilities planning that enable real-time mobile access to planning tools, automated project tracking, metrics, and building transparency in order to support the planning and execution process.
Abstract: Innovative leaders must promote and cultivate a data culture that informs decision making across an institution. In this session, we will discuss data strategies for capital and facilities planning that enable real-time mobile access to planning tools, automated project tracking, metrics, and building transparency in order to support the planning and execution process. Come learn about agile development of available open source tools that enable cost-effective data strategies, including automated processes, and the development and implementation of planning and execution tools.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2018

Designing and Building Your Capital Project

Choosing the Method That’s Right for You

The first step in building your capital project is choosing the delivery method that best meets your institution’s needs and the project’s unique goals.

From Volume 46 Number 4 | July–September 2018

Abstract: Capital projects are designed and built in a number of ways. Each has its strengths and weaknesses, and each prescribes different roles for the owner, architect, and builder. The question is, which way or method best fits your institution’s criteria and project? This article presents a brief outline of the most popular methods by which projects are designed and built.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2016

Symbiosis

Community Colleges Strengthen Mission by Engaging Their Host Communities through Innovative Partnerships

Partnership opportunities are broad and plentiful—only limited by an institution’s imagination.

From Volume 45 Number 1 | October–December 2016

Abstract: Strategic partnerships are a smart fiscal and educational move for higher education institutions. Many of the nation’s community colleges have long explored symbiotic arrangements that benefit student, community, and school. This article examines three schools’ interactions with their host communities and explores how partnerships help deliver on their role as a true community amenity—from providing their students with state-of-the-art learning environments and working with industry leaders to enhance curricula to reaching a geographically disadvantaged demographic of potential students. Partnership opportunities are broad and plentiful and are often only limited by an institution’s imagination.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2016

Designing Innovative Campuses for Tomorrow’s Students

Campus design and architecture will be the prime catalysts for transforming universities into our society’s engines of growth.

From Volume 44 Number 4 | July–September 2016

Abstract: “Designing Innovative Campuses For Tomorrow’s Students” explores increasing investment by higher education institutions in new programs and facilities that boost on-campus innovation and entrepreneurship. This trend is a response, in part, to the changing expectations and demands of Millennial and Generation Z students and their future employers. The impact of this movement, though, goes far beyond those constituencies—changing everything from campus housing to the economic development role of higher education institutions. The examples of Clemson University’s Watt Family Innovation Center and the University of Florida’s Infinity Hall are provided to illustrate the scope of influence and success of these changes.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 1, 2003

The High Cost of Building a Better University

Higher education facilities seem to come at premium cost, even taking into account that educational facilities tend to cost more. The authors argue that this is due to appropriate and strategic high aspirations.

From Volume 32 Number 2 | December–February 2003

Abstract: Why does it cost so much? is a question often asked about university construction. On college and university campuses, the cost of new construction and renovation will appear high relative to other construction efforts in our communities. Part of the explanation of the high construction cost lies in the complexity of what we build, the codes and standards we must meet, and the unique environment within which we build. Moreover, budgets are driven up by the choices we make when we demand that our new facilities serve as visual articulations of institutional image and quality. In short, the high cost of construction is driven by myriad strategic choices and requirements that lead to building a better university.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 1, 2003

An Assessment of Capital Budgeting Practices for Public Higher Education

This study finds a need for new capital projects to include continuing, dedicated revenue streams for the project lifetime in order to avoid continuation of the current state of underfunded maintenance, especially in light of growing needs for upgraded research equipment and space.

From Volume 32 Number 2 | December–February 2003

Abstract: The capital renewal and replacement of the nation’s public higher education facilities has been a growing problem for several decades. While the need for new and improved facilities has increased over the years, many campuses simply have too many aging infrastructures that are too costly to replace. This, at a time when we have less than favorable economic conditions, only adds to the situation. As the age, size, and complexity of buildings continue to grow, so too does the amount of maintenance funding required to keep buildings in good working order. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the 50 states’ efforts of funding public higher education capital needs. This study investigated areas relating to capital needs financing, planning, decision-making processes used in each state, available funding, and future directions in the various states. Of the 50 states, 41 states responded, representing 82 percent of the 50 states.

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Published
January 1, 1989

Financial Planning Guidelines for Facility Renewal and Adaption

This publication provides executive managers and trustees with guidelines for long-term financial planning for plant renewal and adaption.
Abstract: Skillful management of an institution's physical assets is crucial to the institution's financial well-being. This publication provides executive managers and trustees with guidelines for long-term financial planning for plant renewal and adaption. It provides these strategic decision makers with a better understanding of the financial planning requirements necessary to protect the value of their institution's plant assets in relation to evolving institutional missions by giving them a clearer way to think about those assets. Readers are furnished with guidelines, examples of campus plans that incorporate them, and analytic tools.

A joint project of Society for College and University Planning (SCUP), The National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO), The Association of Physical Plant Administrators of Universities and Colleges (APPA), and Coopers and Lybrand.

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