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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 6, 2022

Teetering on the Demographic Cliff, Part 3

Different Conditions Require a Different Kind of Planning

Higher education has faced major changes for some time—COVID-19 accelerated that volatility—and now we’re anticipating the demographic downslope in student enrollment. How and when should institutions mobilize for the difficult work of planning in the face of wrenching change?

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: Part 1 of this series described a major contraction in the pool of college-going 18-year-olds that will reverse decades of growth and stability for higher education. Part 2 explored how we can shape a planning context that supports success in the coming 10 or 20 years. Part 3 suggests how our approach to planning must shift to prepare for abrupt change.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 13, 2021

Mission-Aligned Online Academic Programs at US Jesuit Institutions

Identify and Implement Practices That Mature the Development of Courses

A custom survey measured the process maturity involved in planning, implementing, and evaluating online offerings that reflected the principles of Ignatian Pedagogy.

From Volume 49 Number 4 | July–September 2021

Abstract: The purpose of the research was to observe process maturity associated with the design and development of mission-aligned online academic programs at Jesuit institutions in the United States. Twenty of the twenty-seven American Jesuit institutions were represented, including respondents who were most responsible for implementing the process used to design and develop online courses and programs. A custom survey was created to measure the process maturity involved in planning, implementing, and evaluating the design and development. The research design focused on narrative analysis of each institutional mission, which identified themes and keywords that were included in the custom survey.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 25, 2021

Flexing Beyond the Pandemic

IT as a Change Leader: Driving Institutional Goals Around Retention and Enrollment

The IT division at Minnesota State University, Mankato— working as part of a campus-wide collaborative effort—quickly and successfully installed new tech in more than 100 classrooms within months of COVID-19 first appearing. Outcomes of the large-scale project are seen as a key attractor for incoming students, regardless of where they are learning.

From Volume 49 Number 3 | April–June 2021

Abstract: With the pandemic forcing education online, IT has become integral to keeping campuses moving forward. With a visionary team dedicated to student-centered experiences, the IT division at Minnesota State University, Mankato managed to quickly and successfully install new tech in more than 100 classrooms within months of COVID-19 first appearing. In this period of crisis, their information technology team created a campus-wide collaboration to introduce and integrate new course delivery opportunities. Outcomes of the large-scale project are seen as transformational and a key attractor for incoming students—regardless of where they are learning.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
November 23, 2020

Planning for Instructional Continuity

Develop a Communication and Implementation Strategy Before a Short-Term Class Disruption Happens

Classes can be cancelled because of inclement weather, faculty being unavailable, IT or power outages, pandemic-related closures, and other occurrences. The result of any of these circumstances can be a loss of instruction. St. Joseph’s University developed and applied a best practices guide to ensure the continuation of instruction in the advent of many short-term disruptions.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: When a class is cancelled because of weather, faculty unavailability, IT outage, power outage, or pandemic-related closure, it can result in a loss of instruction. This article details best practices for instructional continuity for many short-term disruptions. Different types of short-term disruptions are identified, as well as how they impact instruction based on course modality. Finally, the article suggests responses for the circumstances, provides a pathway to collaborate with faculty to create a best practices guide for instructional continuity, and shows how to develop a communication and implementation strategy for the plan to reset expectations about instructional disruptions.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
November 9, 2020

Trends in Accreditation

How Will Accreditors Once Again Become Relevant for Higher Education?

Dr. Lynn Priddy answers questions posed by education writer Stephen G. Pelletier related to changes in accreditation and their effect on institutions and students.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: Having been on both the inside of regional accreditation and outside looking back on it, Lynn Priddy knows that accreditation has long tried to revolutionize itself, while at the same time increasingly becoming subject to federal regulatory burdens and expectations from the Department of Education. That has backed it into becoming a bureaucracy at the very time it needed to break out to focus on innovation, learning, and student success.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 7, 2020

Universal Design in the Age of COVID-19

Changes Are Demanding That Campuses Include All Learners

Demographics on campuses have changed, expectations for accessibility have increased, and the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the need to provide inclusive experiences for all learners. Thirty years after the ADA was signed into law, much has been achieved; however, there is more to be accomplished at colleges and universities if we are to provide inclusive experiences for all learners. A renewed approach to campus planning and design, informed by the principles of Universal Design and Universal Design for Learning, and with a commitment to delivering hybridized online and in-person models of educational delivery, is needed now.

From Volume 48 Number 4 | July–September 2020

Abstract: In context of COVID-19, institutions are developing new approaches to online learning at an unprecedented pace. Looking ahead, this great experiment may offer lessons for broadening the definition of accessibility. Three decades after the Americans with Disabilities Act established minimum accessibility standards for the built environment, this moment of accelerated change presents a unique opportunity to utilize hybrid delivery models and universal design principles to rethink accessibility. Sasaki principal Greg Havens examines how continued emphasis on improvements to the physical environment, when combined with hybrid learning and services, could transform the way we plan the human-centered, accessible campuses of tomorrow.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 27, 2020

Totally Virtual

Northcentral University’s School of Business Succeeded in Integrated Strategic Planning in an All-Distance Environment

In the context of a fully online institution, how do you collaborate to strategically plan? You leverage online tools and techniques to keep widely distributed and separated-by-a-distance team members engaged in the process.

From Volume 48 Number 2 | January–March 2020

Abstract: This article presents a case study of the virtual strategic planning process at Northcentral University’s School of Business. Anchoring in practices proven successful in a face-to-face environment, we describe the unique challenges of effective strategic planning for an individual school—when complicated by a solely virtual, distributed environment. We share the tools and techniques we leveraged for each phase of our work, which facilitated overcoming the distance among members of our school community.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2018

Designing and Implementing Systemic Academic Change

Hiram College’s Model for the New Liberal Arts

The Hiram College president offers a constructive and realistic example of systemic change designed to help liberal arts institutions not only survive but thrive in the face of 21st-century challenges.

From Volume 47 Number 1 | October–December 2018

Abstract: For most institutions of higher learning to thrive amid the shifting demographics, financial outlooks, and value propositions of the 21st century, they must design and implement change that is comprehensive rather than compartmental. Since such change comes hard to institutions steeped in century-old traditions, there are few colleges or universities that have undertaken it. Hiram College (OH) is an exception. Given the dearth of lessons from the field, the Hiram College president offers this constructive and realistic example of systemic change and the five possible steps that academic leaders and trustees elsewhere might consider before triggering it.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2018

Disrupting Poor Curricular Processes

A Three-Prong Model Approach with Reflections and Suggestions for Institutional Change

A large-scale change process, such as a curricular process revision, can be made easier by following a proven approach and understanding the potential hazards and challenges involved.

From Volume 46 Number 4 | July–September 2018

Abstract: This article applies the three stages of change (mobilization, implementation, and institutionalization) to the academic curricular process change that occurred during the 2014–2015 academic year at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Reflecting on the manner in which this major initiative was conceptualized and executed has revealed an inadvertent yet seamless application of Curry’s (1992) organizational change model. Throughout each stage of this organizational change, some inherent principles were maintained while balancing the required condensed timeline for completion. These principles included consistent and transparent consultation with many branches of the university community and revision of proposed processes based on feedback from community members. The goal of the authors in sharing the change process at IUP is to provide potential insights for others on recognizing a need for organizational process revision. The authors highlight the actions taken at IUP, offer recommendations, and identify potential hazards to institutions contemplating organizational change.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2018

Research Innovation in Distance Education

The National Research Center for Distance Education and Technological Advancements (DETA) facilitates much-needed institutional research on distance education, furthering improved access and success for all students.

From Volume 46 Number 3 | April–June 2018

Abstract: This article discusses furthering research on distance education and technological advancements across institutions through the launching of a national research center. Specifically, the authors discuss developing an institutional capacity to conduct research, harnessing resources to support research, leading research initiatives and collaborations, and mapping the future of data collection and analysis.

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