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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Example Plans

Published
February 2, 2022

Example Plan

This short-duration strategic framework describes goals and very specific action steps to guide the institution through the current, globally tumultuous era.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 10, 2021

Book Review: Broke

The Racial Consequences of Underfunding Public Universities

From Volume 50 Number 1 | October–December 2021

Abstract: by Laura T. Hamilton and Kelly Nielsen
The University of Chicago Press
294 pages
ISBN-13: 978-0-226-60540-1 (cloth)
ISBN-13:978-0-226-74745-3 (paper)
ISBN-13: 978-0-226-74759 (e-book)

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2021

Prioritizing Campus Diversity Budgets

DEI Funding Has Mostly Survived the Post-Pandemic Cuts

Researchers learned that if diversity initiatives were a strategic priority for an institution, the 2020 financial crisis did little to reduce budget allocations.

From Volume 49 Number 4 | July–September 2021

Abstract: In 2013, the article Planning for the Future: The Impact on the Public University Diversity Budget in Time of Recession reported the impact of the 2008 recession on college and university student affairs diversity unit budgets. Colleges are again faced with another economic downturn with looming budget cuts. The purpose of this article is to revisit the idea of whether primarily student affairs diversity units are hit harder than other institutional units in fiscal cuts and the potential effect that current events related to diversity programming initiatives have had on campus planning. The article explores the status of these budgets during fiscal uncertainty and the social awareness around campus-wide diversity, equity, and inclusion and its prioritization.

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Conference Recordings

Published
July 16, 2021

The Process and Positive Outcomes of Indigenous Placemaking

Ryerson University's experience with indigenous placemaking offers valuable, practical insights into a process that can help your institution to respect and advance indigenous cultures while balancing many other contextual factors.
Abstract: North American institutions have traditionally viewed their lands and histories through a western-oriented cultural lens. Awareness and inclusion of indigenous cultures can be useful in achieving desired outcomes for members of indigenous communities. Creating meaningful indigenous cultural recognition and inclusion on campus is as much about the process as it is the outcomes. Ryerson University's experience with indigenous placemaking offers valuable, practical insights into a process that can help your institution to respect and advance indigenous cultures while balancing many other contextual factors.

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Conference Recordings

Published
July 14, 2021

SCUP Fellow Presentation | Naming Issues on Campus

An Integrated Planning Approach

In this session, we’ll describe the trends, challenges, and opportunities related to re-naming and de-naming on campus.
Abstract: From 2015–2018, amidst a period of heightened activism on campuses and broader societal change, institutions of higher education renamed and de-named campus buildings with namesakes whose legacies were seen to conflict with institutional missions and community values and harmful to members of the campus and surrounding communities. In 2020, the push for addressing problematic namesakes has grown exponentially, expanding beyond buildings and postsecondary education. Effectively managing naming issues on campus and the expectations and interests of internal and external stakeholder groups is challenging, emotional, and time consuming work that has a lasting impact on the physical campus as well as, institutional legacy. We’ll describe the trends, challenges, and opportunities related to re-naming and de-naming on campus.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
February 9, 2021

Leveraging Institutional Planning to Benefit Latinx Students

Racially Disaggregated and Actionable Data Improve Community College Transfer Success

How can institutional planners make a difference for underrepresented minority students? Senior administrators at East Los Angeles College addressed inequities in Latinx student transfer rates with data-backed culturally-relevant strategies.

From Volume 49 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: California Community Colleges, since 2014, have explicitly targeted retention, transfer, and completion outcomes through a mandated planning process supported by newly-allocated fiscal resources. The policy focuses on equity-driven institutional planning that identifies and addresses disparities for specific groups (e.g., Latinx students, foster youths, veterans). This article shares insight from five years of case study research, exploring how senior administrators address Latinx student transfer inequity through new culturally-relevant strategies. Within California, Latinx students comprise the largest share of transfer-aspirants, but they have significantly lower rates of academic success. Key lessons are shared to leverage planning efforts to improve outcomes for underrepresented minority students.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 8, 2020

‘Colorblind-Spots’ in Campus Design

Planners and Architects Can Offer Solutions That Center on Social Justice

Educational leaders are noting that conventional campus design planning efforts have neglected to include the voices of historically underserved communities. Socio-spatial inquiry can help institutions offer an equity approach to inclusivity and authentic engagement.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: To gain a broader understanding of how educational equity is linked to campus design, architects and planners must critically examine community engagement practices. Using critical race theory (CRT) as a framework has exposed racial exclusion and colorblind practices in traditional planning processes. While outreach strategies have received greater scrutiny, less examined are the questions that direct those activities. If the prevailing understanding of a design problem is informed by colorblind inquiry, then design solutions hold little promise to improve social impact on communities most affected by educational inequity. Socio-spatial inquiry offers an equity approach to inclusive outreach and authentic engagement.

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Conference Recordings

Published
July 23, 2020

2020 Annual Conference | July 2020

Education, Opportunity, and Justice in a Post-COVID World

No institution has escaped worrying about the wellbeing of staff, students, faculty and alumni; no school has gone untouched by the economic fallout of going online or staying in place; all anticipate new costs whether instruction is online or hybrid.
Abstract: Leaders across higher education have had to confront the collision of three pandemics—health, economic, and racial. No institution has escaped worrying about the wellbeing of staff, students, faculty and alumni; no school has gone untouched by the economic fallout of going online or staying in place; all anticipate new costs whether instruction is online or hybrid. Most know they have an obligation to address racism and inequality. Where does diversity, equity, and inclusion fit in this world? Should it fit?

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Conference Recordings

Published
July 20, 2020

2020 Annual Conference | July 2020

Keynote: The Empowered University

Shared Leadership for Academic Success and Crisis Management

Freeman A. Hrabowski III has led a transformation of UMBC (University of Maryland, Baltimore County) from a young, regional institution to an innovative research university. In our opening keynote, he discusses how—by taking a hard look in the mirror, understanding strengths and weaknesses, assessing opportunities and challenges, and engaging in difficult conversations—an empowered campus can innovate in course redesign, group-based and experiential learning, entrepreneurship and civic engagement, academic inclusion, and faculty diversity.
Abstract: Freeman A. Hrabowski III has led a transformation of UMBC (University of Maryland, Baltimore County) from a young, regional institution to an innovative research university. In our opening keynote, he discusses his new book, The Empowered University, which probes the ways in which an empowering culture and shared leadership enable a campus to tackle tough issues when times are good and manage challenges when crises emerge. He discusses how—by taking a hard look in the mirror, understanding strengths and weaknesses, assessing opportunities and challenges, and engaging in difficult conversations—an empowered campus can innovate in course redesign, group-based and experiential learning, entrepreneurship and civic engagement, academic inclusion, and faculty diversity.

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Webinar Recordings

Published
July 13, 2020

Voices from the Field: Episode #20

Opportunity Amid Disruption

Hear how Grand Valley State University’s Loren Rullman frames the changes COVID-19 brings to student life, using the word “more”—more technology, more options, more outside-the-box thinking, and more action and cultural change—as we look ahead to the transformation of campuses for fall and beyond.
Abstract: While the pandemic pivot saw institutions racing to embrace new technologies on the fly, the lasting effects of COVID-19 have given rise to a new way of planning ahead and embracing the ability to see changing requirements as opportunities. Hear how Grand Valley’s Loren Rullman frames the changes to student life with the word “more”—more technology, more options, more outside-the-box thinking, and more action and cultural change—as we look ahead to the transformation of campuses for fall and beyond.

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