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Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Published
April 27, 2021

The Art and Science of Supporting Adult Learners

Actionable Steps & Strategies

More than ever, nontraditional students and adult learners are making up more and more of the student body at colleges and universities across the country. Learn how to effectively stand out from other institutions who are making mistakes in 10 key areas with the adult learner population.
Abstract: This was a free webinar hosted by CAEL, AASCU, and SCUP.

Students over the age of 25 are the fastest-growing segment in higher education. From 2000 to 2012, the enrollment of students over the age of 25 increased by 35%, and between 2012 and 2019, the share of students over age 25 increased by another 23%.

Even though more adult learners and nontraditional students are enrolling in higher education, many institutional practices do not consider the unique needs of this population. The best adult learner strategies not only increase student satisfaction, they improve enrollment rates and adult degree attainment.

More than ever, nontraditional students and adult learners are making up more and more of the student body at colleges and universities across the country. Institutions can create equitable pathways that can help overcome disparities in adult learning, and better prepare themselves for adult students who have been disconnected from higher education.

Learn how to effectively stand out from other institutions who are making mistakes in 10 key areas with the adult learner population.

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Delivered
March 9, 2021

2021 Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2021

Adapting Campus Spaces for Generation Z at Carnegie Mellon University

In this session we'll share two recent CMU projects addressing Gen Z's preference for experiential learning, their digital proficiency, and their entrepreneurial spirit—and you can learn now to apply these methods to learning spaces on your campus.
Abstract: Generation Z is now on campus and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) has been preparing. Different from Millennials, Gen Z are digital natives who need campus spaces that engage with this expertise and their preference for hands-on learning. In this session we'll share two recent CMU projects addressing Gen Z's preference for experiential learning, their digital proficiency, and their entrepreneurial spirit. Join us to find out how CMU uses space to engage Gen Z and apply these methods to learning spaces on your campus.

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Published
February 9, 2021

Leveraging Institutional Planning to Benefit Latinx Students

Racially Disaggregated and Actionable Data Improve Community College Transfer Success

How can institutional planners make a difference for underrepresented minority students? Senior administrators at East Los Angeles College addressed inequities in Latinx student transfer rates with data-backed culturally-relevant strategies.

From Volume 49 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: California Community Colleges, since 2014, have explicitly targeted retention, transfer, and completion outcomes through a mandated planning process supported by newly-allocated fiscal resources. The policy focuses on equity-driven institutional planning that identifies and addresses disparities for specific groups (e.g., Latinx students, foster youths, veterans). This article shares insight from five years of case study research, exploring how senior administrators address Latinx student transfer inequity through new culturally-relevant strategies. Within California, Latinx students comprise the largest share of transfer-aspirants, but they have significantly lower rates of academic success. Key lessons are shared to leverage planning efforts to improve outcomes for underrepresented minority students.

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Published
October 31, 2020

The Connected Campus

Building Long-Term Value and Agility by Connecting Offerings, Organizations and Operations

Campus environments play a vital role in student success. By making changes to their combination of spaces, institutions can respond to the shifts transforming higher education. Elliot Felix shares how colleges and universities can prepare for a more blended world by bringing together the digital and physical, enabling greater diversity and inclusion, and implementing flexible structures, staffing, space, and services. Sponsored Content: Knoll and brightspot strategy.
Abstract: Historic separations that defined higher education are dissolving: research is more interdisciplinary, online and on-campus learning are converging, wet and dry labs are blending, teaching and research overlap, and academia forges relationships with corporate partners. Institutions, by improving how they connect what they offer, how they are organized, and how they operate, can build value and agility to better assist their people on campus. Real-world examples in this white paper from Knoll and brightspot strategy discuss how campus spaces support student success, including how to fully use the campus; creating spaces that sustain diverse and flexible ways of working; thinking phygitally; and creating environments where today’s purpose-driven and entrepreneurial students (Gen Z) will thrive as they prepare to enter the workforce.

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Welcome to Campus

Planning for Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity

Creating and sustaining a more welcoming and inclusive campus environment positions both institutions and students to succeed in a more diverse world.

From Volume 47 Number 1 | October–December 2018

Abstract: Higher education institutions, across nearly all socio-cultural cross-sections, are more diverse today than ever before. This evolution in campus demographics also coincides with the changing values, priorities, and needs of students. The bottom line for many of today’s students is clear: now more than ever, values matter when selecting a school. This article explores the programmatic and administrative responses as well as the physical planning and design opportunities associated with creating and sustaining more diverse and inclusive campus environments.

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Published
November 30, 2014

Learning Space Design for the Ethnically Diverse Undergraduate Classroom

This pilot study was conducted to evaluate how space contributes to the learning outcomes of a demographically diverse class of students at Morgan State University, a Historically Black Institution.
Abstract: Recently, education researchers have emphasized the redesign of learning spaces to better accommodate pedagogical change. In particular, studies have found evidence of the relationship between the built environment and learning outcomes—however, no current studies have deliberately focused on the “minority majority” feature of America’s future student composition.

This pilot study was conducted to evaluate how space contributes to the learning outcomes of a demographically diverse class of students at Morgan State University, a Historically Black Institution. Based on the neurobiological literature on environmental enrichment, the authors hypothesized that an enriched learning environment will correlate with increased student activity (directed movement) and engagement (with other students, with room features) and result in significantly improved learning outcomes for an ethnically diverse student group.

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