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Report

Published
May 28, 2024

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Public Higher Education in Today’s Climate Crisis

University–Community Engagement and Planning Strategies for Climate Resilience

This is a SCUP Fellow Research Project Final Report for the 2022–2023 program. This report uses the activities of California State University climate action and adaptation planning to discuss the impacts of extreme weather on university campuses and establish a primer for peer institutions to use as the basis for exploring adoptable model practices.
Abstract: With the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events continuing to increase across the country, the need for resilience planning is more critical than ever before.

Numerous campuses across the California State University (CSU) system have direct experience with wildfires, extended drought, floods, extreme heat, public safety power shutoffs, hurricanes, and sea level rise. The CSU is currently working toward increasing resilience in response to catastrophic events through systemwide technical guidance resources on building and infrastructure design and retrofit. These extreme conditions further prompted the need for vulnerability assessments systemwide and coordinated climate resilience planning and investment activities.

Using the activities of CSU climate action and adaptation planning, 2022-2023 SCUP Fellow Tamara Wallace’s SCUP Fellows project sought to achieve three (3) primary objectives:
  1. Review planning documents and policies that consider climate resiliency governance versus climate resiliency implementation.

  2. Identify key stakeholders to develop a primer for addressing and incorporating campus-community implementation priorities.

  3. Raise awareness with the broader higher education planning community to collect feedback and share model practices.

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Webinar Recordings

Published
April 17, 2024

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Public Higher Education in Today’s Climate Crisis

With the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events continuing to increase across the country, the need for resilience planning is more critical than ever before.
Abstract: With the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events continuing to increase across the country, the need for resilience planning is more critical than ever before.

Numerous campuses across the California State University (CSU) system have direct experience with wildfires, extended drought, floods, extreme heat, public safety power shutoffs, hurricanes, and sea level rise. The CSU is currently working toward increasing resilience in response to catastrophic events through systemwide technical guidance resources on building and infrastructure design and retrofit. These extreme conditions further prompted the need for vulnerability assessments systemwide and coordinated climate resilience planning and investment activities.

Using the activities of CSU climate action and adaptation planning, Wallace’s SCUP Fellows project sought to achieve three (3) primary objectives:

Review planning documents and policies that consider climate resiliency governance versus climate resiliency implementation.
Identify key stakeholders to develop a primer for addressing and incorporating campus-community implementation priorities.
Raise awareness with the broader higher education planning community to collect feedback and share model practices.
Join 2022-2023 SCUP Fellow Tamara Wallace as she shares her findings to help you and your team proactively plan for climate change to mitigate risks, prevent damage, and ensure continued learning from lived experiences.

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Free

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 9, 2024

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What Constitutes Tribal College and University Sustainability?

Research Develops a Framework to Begin the Conversation

Historical successes and challenges join missions, visions, and strategic plans for a glimpse of what TCU institutions are emphasizing, today and in the future.

From Volume 52 Number 2 | January – March 2024

Abstract: This article uses available Tribal College and University (TCU) missions, visions, and strategic plans as well as dissertations focused on TCU research to develop a framework to begin the conversation about what constitutes sustainability for the institutions. The dissertations offer an opportunity to look at historical successes and challenges, while TCU missions, visions, and strategic plans provide a glimpse of what the institutions are emphasizing currently and in the future. Both present elements to consider as part of a larger TCU sustainability framework.

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Conference Presentations

Published
March 5, 2024

Planning and Implementing the Sustainable Campus of the Future

Integrated planning and design that optimizes development capacity and leverages campus growth can help institutions achieve ambitious resilience goals for net-zero energy and resource conservation for a healthier, more sustainable environment. This session will discuss Princeton University’s ongoing efforts to support an ambitious capital plan, address deferred maintenance, advance climate solutions, and maximize use of campus lands. The path to a sustainable campus future will require institutions to go beyond business-as-usual planning to rethink campus infrastructure—particularly energy, stormwater, and landscapes—and activate high-performance sites and buildings.
Abstract: Integrated planning and design that optimizes development capacity and leverages campus growth can help institutions achieve ambitious resilience goals for net-zero energy and resource conservation for a healthier, more sustainable environment. This session will discuss Princeton University’s ongoing efforts to support an ambitious capital plan, address deferred maintenance, advance climate solutions, and maximize use of campus lands. The path to a sustainable campus future will require institutions to go beyond business-as-usual planning to rethink campus infrastructure—particularly energy, stormwater, and landscapes—and activate high-performance sites and buildings.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
February 14, 2023

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Book Review: The Agile College

How Institutions Successfully Navigate Demographic Changes

From Volume 51 Number 2 | January–March 2023

Abstract: The Agile College: How Institutions Successfully Navigate Demographic Changes
by Nathan D. Grawe
Johns Hopkins University Press: Baltimore: 2021
298 pages
ISBN: 978-1421440231

Does hope motivate action or complacency? Does crisis induce change or despair? Nathan D. Grawe readily acknowledges this tension in The Agile College, his follow-up book to his 2018 Demographics and the Demand for Higher Education. The latter propelled the inescapable discussion throughout higher education of the looming “demographic cliff.” The Agile College suggests how agile institutions might prevent demography from becoming destiny.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 6, 2022

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Teetering on the Demographic Cliff, Part 3

Different Conditions Require a Different Kind of Planning

Higher education has faced major changes for some time—COVID-19 accelerated that volatility—and now we’re anticipating the demographic downslope in student enrollment. How and when should institutions mobilize for the difficult work of planning in the face of wrenching change?

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: Part 1 of this series described a major contraction in the pool of college-going 18-year-olds that will reverse decades of growth and stability for higher education. Part 2 explored how we can shape a planning context that supports success in the coming 10 or 20 years. Part 3 suggests how our approach to planning must shift to prepare for abrupt change.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 15, 2021

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Teetering on the Demographic Cliff, Part 2

Turning Away from the Challenge Is the Riskiest Strategy of All

Higher education has faced major changes for some time—COVID-19 accelerated that volatility—and now we’re anticipating the demographic downslope in student enrollment. How and when should institutions mobilize for the difficult work of planning in the face of wrenching change?

From Volume 50 Number 1 | October–December 2021

Abstract: Part 1 of this series described a major contraction in the pool of college-going 18-year-olds that will reverse decades of growth and stability for higher education. Drawing on the path-breaking analysis of Carleton College economist Nathan Grawe, it outlined how widespread but variable the change will be, and discussed some of the effects—on enrollment, revenue, facilities, staffing, and more—for which colleges and universities should be preparing. This Part 2 explores these implications: How can we shape a planning context that supports success in the coming 10 or 20 years? What attitudes and skillsets will remain useful, and what may need to change?

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 17, 2021

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Teetering on the Demographic Cliff, Part 1

Prepare Now for the Challenging Times Ahead

A long-term decline in birth rates raises fundamental planning questions for higher education as the pool of 18-year-olds contracts after 2025. How can planners and leaders use the time we have to prepare for some of the most wrenching changes in a generation?

From Volume 49 Number 4 | July–September 2021

Abstract: A long-term decline in birth rates raises fundamental planning questions for higher education as the pool of 18-year-olds contracts after 2025. This Planning for Higher Education series explores how planners and leaders can use the time we have to prepare for some of the most wrenching changes in a generation. This article, Part 1, surveys the planning horizon as we emerge from COVID-19 and describes the challenges ahead. Part 2 considers specific planning strategies institutions can adopt to meet the challenge. Part 3 tackles perhaps the most daunting challenge: how to mobilize institutions to actually do what needs to be done, however inconvenient (or worse) that may be.

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Conference Recordings

Published
July 15, 2021

Don’t Get Me Started

Launching Integrated Planning Through Crises and Change

This session will address the university's setbacks, challenges, opportunities, and solutions in launching a shoestring integrated planning process amidst multiple crises.
Abstract: In the midst of post-COVID enrollment and financial troubles the University of Arkansas at Little Rock learned to leverage planning and accreditation to build community and resilience. This session will address the university's setbacks, challenges, opportunities, and solutions in launching a shoestring integrated planning process amidst multiple crises: retrenchment, restructuring, leadership changes, an accreditation visit, COVID, and new enterprise resource planning (ERP) software. Find out how your institution can apply out concrete, low-cost, real-life strategies for initial integrated planning initiatives as well as respond to common setbacks and pitfalls in a VUCA context.

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Conference Recordings

Published
July 12, 2021

Building a Path Forward

Overcoming Pandemic Impacts on HBCUs

United Negro College Fund and HBCU college leaders will examine enrollment, instruction, student success, historic preservation, and fundraising in a post-pandemic world and explore how we can transform these challenges into successes.
Abstract: HBCUs have a tradition of providing affordable, culturally accessible higher education to minority and first-generation students as they support disadvantaged communities. The evolution of planning, partnerships, and pedagogy at HBCUs provides lessons for any stressed institution. United Negro College Fund and HBCU college leaders will examine enrollment, instruction, student success, historic preservation, and fundraising in a post-pandemic world and explore how we can transform these challenges into successes. Join the panel for an engaging discussion about physical, academic, financial, and operational strategies for reshaping and strengthening HBCUs and apply lessons learned to address diversity, equity, and inclusion at your institution.

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