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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Published
June 14, 2021

Good Academic Planning Is What Happens . . .

. . . When Opportunity Meets with Integration

From Volume 49 Number 3 | April–June 2021

Abstract: The division of Academic Affairs at the University of West Georgia became involved with the Society for College and University Planning and integrated planning over four years ago. The result was slowly integrating academic planning with facilities, accreditation, budget, student affairs, and student success. Just as Thomas Edison was probably not thinking about integrated planning when he was quoted on planning, we had no idea how fruitful our efforts would become. We enhanced and assessed student scheduling, learning spaces, faculty support, and student success and support services in a meaningful way that resulted in positive and measurable outcomes for improving learning and reducing costs.

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Delivered
March 19, 2021

2021 North Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2021

After the Fall

Including Faculty in Retention Efforts Without Burnout

Come learn how you can plan and coordinate campus-wide retention efforts and promote faculty participation at your institution.
Abstract: Retention matters for practical (keeping the doors open), ethical (successfully educating students), and cultural reasons (improving campus climate, which in turn improves retention and persistence.) In this session, we'll focus on the effective and budget-conscious retention efforts for a northeastern regional public institution. While administrative staff played an essential role, educating and coordinating faculty made a key difference in the success of these efforts. Come learn how you can plan and coordinate campus-wide retention efforts and promote faculty participation at your institution.

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Published
February 22, 2021

Strategies for Engaging Faculty in Change

In difficult times, planning and the successful implementation of that planning requires the buy-in and support of a range of stakeholders—particularly the faculty. We interviewed Sandra Patterson-Randles, chancellor emerita and professor of English at Indiana University Southeast, to discuss how to best engage faculty in planning initiatives.

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Published
January 14, 2021

The Faculty Factor

Creating Buy-In for Difficult Planning

In this sessino we explore the successes and failures involved in two planning initiatives that required broad-based faculty support in order to reverse issues with programmatic quality, student success, and institutional accreditation.
Abstract: In difficult times, planning and the successful implementation of that planning require the buy-in and support of a whole range of stakeholders–but particularly the faculty, since they carry out the institution’s teaching and research missions.

Faculty can make or break successful planning.

An institution must be very circumspect in their choice of representative faculty for planning groups, how they are engaged in the planning process, and how they interact with other campus constituencies for maximum buy-in. This endeavor is particularly difficult when the new planning process follows previous attempts that have failed because of faculty resistance or lack of meaningful involvement. This session details successful planning initiatives at two regional universities, one in the Midwest and one in the southern Northeast, where earlier planning efforts failed because of “the faculty factor.”

Join us to explore the successes and failures involved in these two planning initiatives that required broad-based faculty support in order to reverse issues with programmatic quality, student success, and institutional accreditation.

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Published
November 23, 2020

Planning for Instructional Continuity

Develop a Communication and Implementation Strategy Before a Short-Term Class Disruption Happens

Classes can be cancelled because of inclement weather, faculty being unavailable, IT or power outages, pandemic-related closures, and other occurrences. The result of any of these circumstances can be a loss of instruction. St. Joseph’s University developed and applied a best practices guide to ensure the continuation of instruction in the advent of many short-term disruptions.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: When a class is cancelled because of weather, faculty unavailability, IT outage, power outage, or pandemic-related closure, it can result in a loss of instruction. This article details best practices for instructional continuity for many short-term disruptions. Different types of short-term disruptions are identified, as well as how they impact instruction based on course modality. Finally, the article suggests responses for the circumstances, provides a pathway to collaborate with faculty to create a best practices guide for instructional continuity, and shows how to develop a communication and implementation strategy for the plan to reset expectations about instructional disruptions.

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Delivered
July 20, 2020

2020 Annual Conference | July 2020

Best Practices for Instructional Continuity During Short-Term Disruptions

This session will showcase best practices for instructional continuity for most short-term disruptions.
Abstract: When a class is cancelled because of weather, faculty unavailability, IT outage, power outage, or pandemic-related closure, it can result in a complete loss of instruction. A best practices guide can mitigate this. This session will showcase best practices for instructional continuity for most short-term disruptions. We will cover different types of disruptions and modalities of instruction (on-campus and online). You will take back communication strategies, planning tips, and best practices to create a plan to deal with short-term disruptions at your institution.

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Published
May 26, 2020

Voices from the Field: Episode #7

Beyond Academics: A Supportive Faculty Helps Ensure Continuity

Florida Atlantic University Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Bret Danilowicz discusses how their online-experienced faculty stepped up to assist colleagues, how he’s prioritizing to ensure continuity and assess capital projects, and the importance of pulling together as a community to find ways to help beyond academics.
Abstract: Even with a brief head start when COVID-19 forced all instruction online, Florida Atlantic University’s six campuses still had a lot of work to do. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Bret Danilowicz discusses how their online-experienced faculty stepped up to assist colleagues, how he’s prioritizing to ensure continuity and assess capital projects, and the importance of pulling together as a community to find ways to help beyond academics.

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Published
March 20, 2020

Challenging “If You Build It, They Will Come”

Success of Active Learning Is About More Than the Space

Active learning spaces can be catalysts for improved teaching and learning. Yet the key to planning for and effectively implementing them on campus is faculty who are willing to change, accept, and evolve their instructional delivery.

From Volume 48 Number 2 | January–March 2020

Abstract: Five years ago, Thomas Jefferson University East Falls Campus (formerly Philadelphia University) planned and implemented an initiative to more mindfully design spaces that optimize active and collaborative teaching and learning. For active learning spaces to be true change agents at the institutional level, we suggest colleges and universities ground an active learning space initiative in the institution’s mission and strategic goals, designate a coordinator to involve stakeholders throughout the entire project, identify faculty members willing to participate, and build a network of support structures within which those faculty members can share their ideas and experiences.

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Delivered
March 8, 2020

2020 North Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2020

The Evolving Academic Workplace

Learn current methodologies for effective, function-based workplace planning that eliminate redundancies, break down silos, allow dynamic modes of working, and increase collaboration.
Abstract: The increasing cost and scarcity of real estate are causing universities to think strategically about workplace needs. Adapting new trends in workplace design can position institutions to future-proof space and meet stakeholder expectations. These trends include the use of evidence-based tools that collect data on work modes in order to tailor space that enables maximum productivity and effectiveness. Learn current methodologies for effective, function-based workplace planning that eliminate redundancies, break down silos, allow dynamic modes of working, and increase collaboration.

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