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Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Example Plans

Published
May 31, 2022

Sustainability Plan

Abstract: “In 2013 TRU established ‘increasing sustainability’ as one of its five strategic priorities for 2014-2019. This Strategic Sustainability Plan (SSP) is aligned with the university’s strategic plan, and provides a focus for TRU’s efforts toward sustainability over the same period. The SSP is comprehensive in nature, and includes more than 130 recommended strategies across four key focus areas: Operations & Planning, Advocacy & Engagement, Learning, and Administration. The SSP is intended to provide a framework for each TRU department and operational unit to incorporate sustainability initiatives into their own planning processes (the structure of the plan is illustrated on the opposing page). . . . Unlike some strategic documents, the plan takes a comprehensive approach of documenting strategies over the next 5 years. These strategies are not all the responsibility of one department or office, but rather are shared among many. This comprehensive approach will allow each office or department to see where and how it can play a role in TRU’s sustainability journey.”

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Conference Recordings

Published
October 4, 2021

Learning From A Living Building

Facing (Un)foreseen Challenges

The Kendeda Building, a deep green LEED Platinum Living Building, offers many lessons learned and best practices regarding net-positive water, energy, and waste that you can use to fight climate change and COVID-19 on your campus.
Abstract: At a time when institutions must change the status quo in their approach to addressing the climate crisis through the campus built environment, the Kendeda Building at the Georgia Institute of Technology shows us that successful change is possible. The Kendeda Building, a deep green LEED Platinum Living Building, offers many lessons learned and best practices regarding net-positive water, energy, and waste that you can use to fight climate change and COVID-19 on your campus. Come learn how to overcome design and operational challenges—both expected and unexpected—of high-performance buildings to create a healthier and safer campus environment.

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Conference Recordings

Published
July 13, 2021

A New Plan for Building Green

This session will focus on the next step in the evolution of green building and provide a comprehensive sustainability framework for responsible development with a holistic view of the campus and community wellbeing.
Abstract: LEED is not always suited to campus-wide, long-term perspectives on building development and carbon emissions reductions. It can often result in a more expensive process that misses the mark on achieving realized savings, leading universities to shift away from LEED. This session will focus on the next step in the evolution of green building and provide a comprehensive sustainability framework for responsible development with a holistic view of the campus and community wellbeing. Come learn how you can use this improved planning process for green building by outlining rigorous sustainable design standards and integrating operational tracking to examine facility performance.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2020

From Lagging to Leading

Bentley University and Boston College Sack Stereotypes About Athletic Facility Sustainability and Energy Performance

An integrated team of cross-discipline collaborators accomplished their objective of creatively reimagining athletic facilities at two institutions for the greater good of each campus and its community. Using sustainable and cost-efficient design opportunities and aligned technologies, they succeeded in countering the outdated stereotype of the athletic building as a lagging energy performer.

From Volume 48 Number 4 | July–September 2020

Abstract: Athletic buildings suffer from a long-held image problem. Fieldhouses, hockey and basketball arenas, and other large indoor competition and practice facilities traditionally lag other campus spaces in energy performance and sustainability. However, because of the size, scale, and location of athletic buildings, there is significant untapped potential as campus planners seek creative ways to implement change initiatives. The authors share lessons learned from their recent experiences applying imaginative, cost-efficient approaches to sports and recreation buildings. In addition to reimagining how the facilities can contribute to the greater good of the entire campus, they demonstrate the value of early cross-discipline collaboration and problem-solving to fulfill shared aspirations.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2007

Crafting the Master Plan: A Collaborative Challenge for Community Colleges

Master planning can help an institution address major challenges, but you have to know how to do it right. This article examines the planning process, with special emphasis on community and consensus building, using case studies from two rapidly growing community college districts in Texas and California.

From Volume 35 Number 3 | April–June 2007

Abstract: Creating a campus master plan is the first step in the process of managing enrollment growth; however, the plan is not just a document about buildings and parking spaces and classrooms and square footage. The plan should be viewed as an investment in the future of the institution and a way to link the college's mission and vision statements to the physical learning environment. This article examines the planning process, with special emphasis on community and consensus building, using case studies from two rapidly growing community college districts in Texas and California.

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