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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Conference Recordings

Published
March 18, 2021

2021 North Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2021

Setting Building Energy Standards

Learning from City, State, and Utility Incentive Programs

Individual cities, states, and utility incentive programs are going beyond carbon neutral standards to embrace energy consumption limits—this session will present these new strategies as models and options for campus building energy standards.
Abstract: It isn't enough that institutions require all-electric campus buildings that rely on renewable energy—they must also be low load and low energy consumption. Individual cities, states, and utility incentive programs are going beyond carbon neutral standards to embrace energy consumption limits. This session will present these new strategies as models and options for campus building energy standards that address a variety of university sustainability goals. Come learn how your institution can avoid re-inventing the wheel when defining truly impactful campus guidelines by using these methodologies to limit energy consumption and peak demand.

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Report

Published
November 23, 2020

The Connected Campus

Building Long-Term Value and Agility by Connecting Offerings, Organizations and Operations

Campus environments play a vital role in student success. By making changes to their combination of spaces, institutions can respond to the shifts transforming higher education. Elliot Felix shares how colleges and universities can prepare for a more blended world by bringing together the digital and physical, enabling greater diversity and inclusion, and implementing flexible structures, staffing, space, and services. Sponsored Content: Knoll and brightspot strategy.
Abstract: Historic separations that defined higher education are dissolving: research is more interdisciplinary, online and on-campus learning are converging, wet and dry labs are blending, teaching and research overlap, and academia forges relationships with corporate partners. Institutions, by improving how they connect what they offer, how they are organized, and how they operate, can build value and agility to better assist their people on campus. Real-world examples in this white paper from Knoll and brightspot strategy discuss how campus spaces support student success, including how to fully use the campus; creating spaces that sustain diverse and flexible ways of working; thinking phygitally; and creating environments where today’s purpose-driven and entrepreneurial students (Gen Z) will thrive as they prepare to enter the workforce.

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Webinar Recordings

Published
August 6, 2020

Developing Successful Campus Collaborations and Trust During COVID

In this webinar, Gretchen Von Grossmann of Tufts University and Sarah Madden and Kelly McQueeney of Harvard University shared how they have brought their campus communities together to tackle COVID challenges and what protocols and perspectives are becoming “game changers” in the process.

This is part of the series “Less Talk, More Action: Tactical Topics to Return to Campus.”

Abstract: In the current COVID environment, each day brings our academic institutions more information and insight regarding what their physical campuses can handle and what their returning students and faculty are comfortable with.

Join us as we learn from representatives at Tufts University and Harvard University how they have brought their campus communities together to tackle COVID challenges and what aspects may become “game changers” in the process. We will learn current perspectives and protocols and how these institutions came to these conclusions. The presenters will share how they have prepared for a range of outcomes, offering some valuable examples of effective leadership in this time of crisis.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
March 8, 2020

2020 North Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2020

Roadmap to a Capital Renewal Program

We will share how Tufts University manages its capital renewal program using a ranking strategy that considers building condition, utilization, modernization needs, and academic priority.
Abstract: Most universities don't have enough funds to address all capital renewal needs. Understanding the condition of physical infrastructure and benchmarking against the institutional mission optimizes limited funds allocated for deferred maintenance. We will share how Tufts University manages its capital renewal program using a ranking strategy that considers building condition, utilization, modernization needs, and academic priority. We will cover how to collect and process data to establish a 10-year capital renewal plan, considering initiatives like sustainability and carbon neutrality.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
March 8, 2019

2019 North Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2019

Expanding Residential Accommodation With Limited New Construction

Come learn how a 2016 housing planning study that started with an inventory analysis quickly evolved into an ongoing program to add 100+ beds per year beginning in 2017.
Abstract: New dorm construction takes time and funding that often competes with the ongoing need to upgrade existing dorms. Despite limited resources, campus planning and capital programs teams are successfully doing both. Tufts University's first housing program since the 1970s is transforming the undergraduate residential experience two-fold: by rapidly increasing the on-campus bed supply in existing facilities and by renewing residential buildings. Come learn how a 2016 housing planning study that started with an inventory analysis quickly evolved into an ongoing program to add 100+ beds per year beginning in 2017.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2007

Book Review: Degrees That Matter

Climate Change and the University

Greening the Ivory Tower and Degrees That Matter provide an enlightening case study of Tufts University’s sustainability initiatives over the past 17 years.

From Volume 36 Number 1 | October–December 2007

Abstract: Greening the Ivory Tower and Degrees That Matter provide an enlightening case study of Tufts University’s sustainability initiatives over the past 17 years. While Greening the Ivory Tower could be aptly titled Lessons Learned from the Field, its sequel, Degrees That Matter, could be renamed More Lessons Learned. As companion pieces, these works offer comprehensive and accessible information for creating a campus environmental sustainability program that addresses waste reduction, energy efficiency, transportation reform, and purchasing practices.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2005

Campus Chapels Make A Comeback: Planning for the Adaptive Reuse of Campus Chapels

Campus heritage, a growing interest in spirituality among multidenominational students, the need for multiple use of student spaces are fueling a closer look at campus chapels. This article takes a look at those factors and issues to be addressed in the renovation and reuse of such buildings.

From Volume 33 Number 3 | March–May 2005

Abstract: Campus chapels once bespoke a school’s curriculum, defined the student body, contributed to ambiance, and served as a recruitment tool for parents looking to religion to influence their children’s character. As schools strayed from their religious roots, encountered pressing program needs, and faced funding concerns, many of these rarely used buildings fell into disrepair. In the last few years, efforts to preserve an institution’s heritage, maximize space, and address spirituality have led schools to consider restoring and reusing campus chapels. This article focuses on keeping the chapel’s original design intent while capitalizing on its strengths to upgrade the building and supplement its usage.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2003

Aligning Values for Effective Sustainability Planning

To create a sustainable campus, management must be integrated with education and research, and institutional values need to be aligned with sustainability planning.

From Volume 31 Number 3 | March–May 2003

Abstract: Sustainable management of college and university campuses enhances learning and exposes students to the challenges and opportunities they will face upon graduation. There are many technologies and measures that can lead colleges and universities toward a more sustainable path. Taken together, the contributions in this issue of the journal clearly demonstrate that it is possible for colleges and universities to meet the needs of their current and future generations of students. But the question remains whether they will be able to meet those needs and do so in a manner that does not prevent others, outside their institutions, from meeting their future needs. This is really about institutional change, and without a shift in personal and institutional values these options will not become the default practice instead of the optional alternative. Moving higher education onto a sustainable trajectory requires that administrators, trustees and staff, faculty, and students participate in a transparent process of setting goals and implementing them. Planners have the opportunity to become the true visionaries of higher education who help faculty and administrators combine teaching, research, and campus management into a higher level of learning for our students as our example leads society toward a sustainable future.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2003

Effective Campus Environmental Assessment

The reduction of institutional impacts on global climate change provides a compelling organizational strategy for comprehensive planning, implementation, and evaluation of campus stewardship efforts.

From Volume 31 Number 3 | March–May 2003

Abstract: This article examines environmental assessments as a decision-making tool, distinguishing broad-based, targeted, and goal-oriented efforts as the three types most commonly practiced on campuses. The authors discuss benefits and problems associated with these approaches and conclude that the goal-oriented approach is most likely to be successful. They make a case for action to reduce institutional impacts on climate change as a compelling and goal-oriented direction for comprehensive planning, implementation, and evaluation of campus stewardship efforts. Tufts University’s commitment to emission reductions in the Kyoto Protocol is discussed, and impacts on curriculum, operations, and university decision making are explored.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2003

Introduction: Sustainability: Taking the Long View

From Volume 31 Number 3 | March–May 2003

Abstract: Statistics demonstrate that our present land use and consumption patterns present the challenge of meeting contemporary needs without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Higher education has a special obligation to answer this challenge because it plays a role in producing the leaders, policy makers, and citizens of the world, and it uses a large share of resources to do so. To meet this challenge, sustainable practices and paradigms must permeate colleges and universities, from curricula to physical plant to leadership and institutional policies. This overview of the articles in this theme issue discusses methods for incorporating sustainability into higher education across a wide array of institutional realms.

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