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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 10, 2021

Book Review: Broke

The Racial Consequences of Underfunding Public Universities

From Volume 50 Number 1 | October–December 2021

Abstract: by Laura T. Hamilton and Kelly Nielsen
The University of Chicago Press
294 pages
ISBN-13: 978-0-226-60540-1 (cloth)
ISBN-13:978-0-226-74745-3 (paper)
ISBN-13: 978-0-226-74759 (e-book)

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Conference Recordings

Published
May 14, 2021

2021 Pacific Regional Conference | April–June 2021

Student Success

Define It, Support it

In this session, we'll share how institutions have made changes in their metrics, planning and design strategies, and campus facilities that contribute to recruitment, academic growth, and graduation rates.
Abstract: The pandemic has exposed and added to the vulnerabilities that students face. It has also impacted how institutions serving underrepresented students are working to redefine student support in an evolving campus environment. In this session, we'll share how institutions have made changes in their metrics, planning and design strategies, and campus facilities that contribute to recruitment, academic growth, and graduation rates. Join us for an interactive discussion about student success strategies and learn new approaches for meeting returning students' needs, including hybrid learning, flexible learning spaces, and the importance of representation, inclusivity, safety, and wellness.

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$119

Conference Recordings

Published
September 25, 2020

2020 Pacific Regional Conference | August–October 2020

Adapting the Campus

Thoughtful Planning + Re-Shaping Physical Space in Real-Time

We will share how The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) is navigating the fall semester and its overall vision for the campus, including opening a living and learning neighborhood to enhance student life and success in the midst of the pandemic.
Abstract: The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) is implementing its Long Range Development Plan (LRDP) to transform the physical environment into a premier destination for students, patients, faculty, staff, and the community. While this vision remains intact, the pandemic has tested campus resiliency. We will share how UCSD is navigating the fall semester and its overall vision for the campus, including opening a living and learning neighborhood to enhance student life and success in the midst of the pandemic. Come learn about this project’s guiding principles, research-based design, lessons learned, and best practices for adapting to a changing environment.

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$119

Conference Recordings

Published
July 24, 2020

2020 Annual Conference | July 2020

Vision to Reality

Reshaping Institutional Models for Underserved Populations

Come learn how you can translate institutional values of access and equity into resilient physical planning strategies that will help your institution support underserved students in a time of crisis.
Abstract: New learner-centered tools must emphasize collaboration and scalability as higher education responds to a worldwide health crisis and social unrest sparked by inequity. This session will illustrate how the needs of traditionally underserved students are reshaping higher education delivery, now more than ever due to increased virtual learning and loss of campus space. We'll share how we're learning as we go, implementing innovative, resource-conscious, and practical solutions to urgent challenges. Come learn how you can translate institutional values of access and equity into resilient physical planning strategies that will help your institution support underserved students in a time of crisis.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

Planning Pathways to Carbon Reduction

Abstract: Nationally, many campuses are finding innovative pathways to achieving carbon neutrality that are feasible enough for others to build on. We will share how two universities charted paths to carbon neutrality and have become living laboratories where new ideas can be tested, refined, and prototyped. This session will provide tools and techniques to comprehend a campus's carbon profile, set carbon reductions goals, and explore alternative solutions to carbon-intensive practices in campus and space planning, infrastructure, and operations.

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Free

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Free

Conference Presentations

Delivered
March 27, 2019

2019 Pacific Regional Conference | March 2019

An Implementable Master Plan for Access, Student Success, and Sustainable Growth

A state mandate to increase undergraduate enrollment, the aspiration to achieve an Association of American Universities institution profile, and a desire to become carbon neutral—we'll discuss how the University of California (UC) Riverside negotiated these competing challenges while developing its master plan.
Abstract: A state mandate to increase undergraduate enrollment, the aspiration to achieve an Association of American Universities institution profile, and a desire to become carbon neutral—we'll discuss how the University of California (UC) Riverside negotiated these competing challenges while developing its master plan. Innovation is key while achieving access improvements, research aspirations, and environmental stewardship objectives. We'll share how community college districts, private colleges, and other institutions are implementing practical solutions to the new century's challenges while maintaining the institution’s sense of place and heritage.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2004

Research Space: Who Needs It, Who Gets It, Who Pays for It?

An overview of research space management in the United States, based on interviews with senior administrators, Internet documents, and the authors’ vast experience, identifies important trends that need attention.

From Volume 33 Number 1 | September–November 2004

Abstract: Today, the amount of space devoted to research at research universities exceeds that of classrooms and class laboratories. This research space portfolio presents important policy and management challenges. As stewards of this portfolio, universities must address issues of funding the construction of research facilities, equipping and maintaining them, allocating and accounting for space used for research, and managing, in broadest terms, the physical and administrative infrastructure in which research is conducted. As this article illustrates, managing the balance between the growing demand for and the supply of research space is complicated. To address the issues of research space, universities have developed a variety of space management methods to fit their unique research missions, priorities, and operational culture. This article provides important insights into this little studied aspect of higher education space planning. The article is an overview of research space management across the U. S. on general campuses and in health science centers. It is based on interviews with senior administrators in selected research universities conducted specifically for this study, information about research space management available on university documents on the Internet, and on the work of Ira Fink and Associates, Inc. in programming research facilities on a multitude of campuses nationwide.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2004

Solving Campus Parking Shortages: New Solutions for an Old Problem

Recent major enrollment and construction trends on campus mean that, once again, the demand for parking is increasing at the same time as supply is being eroded. Universities and colleges, however, are able to achieve more integrated parking and transportation policies than are other large institutions.

From Volume 33 Number 1 | September–November 2004

Abstract: Universities and colleges across the country are faced with growth in the campus population and the loss of surface parking lots for new buildings. The response of many institutions is to build new garages with the assumption that parking demand ratios will remain the same. Such an approach, however, can be extremely expensive—upwards of $2,000 per net new space annually. In many cases, a mix of parking and demand reduction programs—such as shuttles, bicycle and pedestrian improvements, and financial incentives not to drive—can accommodate growth at a lower cost per trip. A balanced approach will also tend to support other goals, from improving town-gown relations to maintaining debt capacity. Demand management strategies have been employed by institutions for many years. However, it is less common for a cost-benefit analysis to be undertaken comparing them with new parking construction. Using examples from universities in California and Colorado, this article demonstrates a methodology to inform basic decisions on the amount of parking required to cater to campus growth, which can be incorporated into campus master planning.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2003

The Road Less Traveled: Sustainable Transportation for Campuses

The high costs of parking expansion have propelled many institutions toward a transportation demand management strategy to shift many trips from single occupant automobiles to other modes of travel.

From Volume 31 Number 3 | March–May 2003

Abstract: This article provides a survey of innovative approaches to campus transportation in the United States. The high costs of parking expansion have propelled many institutions toward a transportation demand management strategy, using parking pricing, transit passes for students and employees, and investment in bicycle infrastructure to shift many trips from single-occupant automobiles to other modes of travel. These institutions have experienced multiple benefits, including lower transportation costs, lower environmental impacts, and improved community relations.

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