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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Conference Recordings

Published
July 15, 2021

Go Outside! Learnscapes and Optimizing the Spaces In Between

In this session, we'll discuss how to connect structure, landscape, and sustainability to counter VUCA and establish stable and productive learning environments that enhance performance, creativity, and wellness through connections to nature and newly-expanded views and perspectives.
Abstract: Pandemics aren't going away, which is why institutions must invest in permanent outdoor learnscapes to optimize educational outcomes. In this session, we'll discuss how to connect structure, landscape, and sustainability to counter VUCA and establish stable and productive learning environments that enhance performance, creativity, and wellness through connections to nature and newly-expanded views and perspectives. Come discover new ways to transform your outdoor campus spaces with wellness-oriented designs to offset enrollment decline, maintain stable learning conditions, and stabilize class sizes.

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Conference Recordings

Published
April 30, 2021

2021 Pacific Regional Conference | April–June 2021

Mindful Redesign for New and Effective Learning Environments

Join us to discuss what our campuses are planning for the immediate and distant future of teaching and learning.
Abstract: This session will focus on how changes in academic planning—accelerated in large part due to COVID-19—are resulting in new physical and virtual frameworks for learning. These range from enhanced online platforms to flexible hybrid environments, including the reappropriation and redesign of ‘found spaces,’ such as valuable and underutilized exterior zones on our existing campuses. Join us to discuss what our campuses are planning for the immediate and distant future of teaching and learning.

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$119

Conference Recordings

Published
August 28, 2020

2020 Pacific Regional Conference | August–October 2020

Curriculum Redesign

Evolving Practices for Virtual and Physical Learning

This session will explore how institutions can move away from “crisis teaching” and towards a mindfully-redesigned and thoughtfully-delivered curriculum spanning a range of models, from virtual to hybrid to in-person learning.
Abstract: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, institutions have been making pedagogical changes that will impact the long-term future of higher education. This session will explore how institutions can move away from “crisis teaching” and towards a mindfully-redesigned and thoughtfully-delivered curriculum spanning a range of models, from virtual to hybrid to in-person learning. Institutions must quickly adapt their curricula in order to provide quality education in a post-COVID era. Come learn how you can prepare your institution to meet current needs and future challenges in learning through sharing ideas and experiences with your peers.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
March 27, 2019

2019 Pacific Regional Conference | March 2019

Performance-based Standards Foster Creative Solutions for Environments Supporting Critical Discourse

We'll discuss how to rethink the processes for creating and implementing campus standards, focusing on the “why” of campus standards while balancing life-cycle costs and ease of operation.
Abstract: Design standards define what makes a campus unique without limiting creativity. This session highlights the trials and tribulations of defining what should and should not be in the campus standards. We'll discuss how to rethink the processes for creating and implementing campus standards, focusing on the “why” of campus standards while balancing life-cycle costs and ease of operation. We'll also look at how to better implement and communicate the standards, increasing the likelihood that they are incorporated into projects.

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Free

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
March 27, 2019

2019 Pacific Regional Conference | March 2019

Leveraging the On-Campus Admissions Center to Showcase Institutional Values

We will discuss the planning and design of Colorado University's Center for Academic Success and Engagement (CASE), providing an example of thoughtful intra-institutional discourse focused on institutional values.
Abstract: In the competitive higher education landscape, a prospective student's campus experience is a defining moment in a daunting decision-making process. Colorado University (CU) embedded its new admissions center and auditorium in an academic building central to the campus. CU’s strategy impacts both prospective students and influences broader institutional life. We will discuss the planning and design of CU's Center for Academic Success and Engagement (CASE), providing an example of thoughtful intra-institutional discourse focused on institutional values.

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Free

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2004

Solving Campus Parking Shortages: New Solutions for an Old Problem

Recent major enrollment and construction trends on campus mean that, once again, the demand for parking is increasing at the same time as supply is being eroded. Universities and colleges, however, are able to achieve more integrated parking and transportation policies than are other large institutions.

From Volume 33 Number 1 | September–November 2004

Abstract: Universities and colleges across the country are faced with growth in the campus population and the loss of surface parking lots for new buildings. The response of many institutions is to build new garages with the assumption that parking demand ratios will remain the same. Such an approach, however, can be extremely expensive—upwards of $2,000 per net new space annually. In many cases, a mix of parking and demand reduction programs—such as shuttles, bicycle and pedestrian improvements, and financial incentives not to drive—can accommodate growth at a lower cost per trip. A balanced approach will also tend to support other goals, from improving town-gown relations to maintaining debt capacity. Demand management strategies have been employed by institutions for many years. However, it is less common for a cost-benefit analysis to be undertaken comparing them with new parking construction. Using examples from universities in California and Colorado, this article demonstrates a methodology to inform basic decisions on the amount of parking required to cater to campus growth, which can be incorporated into campus master planning.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2003

The Road Less Traveled: Sustainable Transportation for Campuses

The high costs of parking expansion have propelled many institutions toward a transportation demand management strategy to shift many trips from single occupant automobiles to other modes of travel.

From Volume 31 Number 3 | March–May 2003

Abstract: This article provides a survey of innovative approaches to campus transportation in the United States. The high costs of parking expansion have propelled many institutions toward a transportation demand management strategy, using parking pricing, transit passes for students and employees, and investment in bicycle infrastructure to shift many trips from single-occupant automobiles to other modes of travel. These institutions have experienced multiple benefits, including lower transportation costs, lower environmental impacts, and improved community relations.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2003

Successful Strategies for Planning a Green Building

Green buildings offer many advantages over their conventional counterparts, but their development requires a set of clear environmental performance goals as well as involvement from a wide range of participants.

From Volume 31 Number 3 | March–May 2003

Abstract: Green buildings offer many compelling advantages over their conventional counterparts—increased educational performance, lower energy costs, and lower environmental impact, to name a few—so green buildings should be easier to develop. Unfortunately, that isn’t always the case. Several strategies are important to avoid a protracted process. Develop a set of clear environmental performance goals (buildings as pedagogical tools, climate-neutral operations, maximized human performance), use Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED™) as a gauge of performance, and use the project to reform the campus building process. All of these steps need to involve a range of participants—students, faculty, administration, and facilities staff—to achieve the best results.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2003

Environmental Management Systems: A Framework for Planning Green Campuses

Employing environmental management systems can help institutions address campus environmental impacts by providing a structure for assessing and improving the sustainability of all facets of campus operations.

From Volume 31 Number 3 | March–May 2003

Abstract: Drawing on recent survey data from the National Wildlife Federation and other publications, this article explains what an environmental management system is and identifies its components; examines how environmental management systems have been applied and adapted to higher education settings; reports on trends in implementation; and illustrates how the environmental management system can help in planning green campuses. It addresses such issues as environmental policy, training, compliance, performance evaluation, staffing, and assessment within the higher education context.

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