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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 14, 2020

Untangling the History and Procedures of Strategic Planning

We Review a Century of Literature for Answers

Almost since the time when the concept of strategic planning first appeared in the literature of higher education, its value has been questioned. Do strategic plans help institutions achieve excellence, or are they more likely to gather dust on a shelf? Perspectives are presented through a review of nearly 100 years of the history and theoretical basis for strategic plans.

From Volume 48 Number 4 | July–September 2020

Abstract: Is a strategic plan necessary for institutional success? In preparation for a new strategic plan at UTEP, we reviewed literature and found many publications that described the procedures of plan making and also case studies of how plans are produced. We also found substantial literature that questioned the value of strategic plans. These findings prompted us to think about the historical and theoretical basis for strategic plans: How did they emerge, what is their theoretical value, and is there a right way to do them? In our article we offer surprising answers to these questions based on a review of a century of theory and planning literature.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2019

Using Big Data

How Moneyball and an Ardent Baseball Fan Shaped Successful Metrics-Based University Planning

Over the last three decades, the University of Texas at El Paso has refined its planning system and integrated metrics within a comprehensive planning framework—to produce dramatic outcomes.

From Volume 48 Number 1 | October–December 2019

Abstract: Big data and analytics are promoted as an approach that can improve educational quality, student success, strategic and operational decision-making, and knowledge discovery. Over the last three decades, the University of Texas at El Paso has refined its planning system and integrated metrics within a comprehensive planning framework—to produce dramatic outcomes. The article describes the institution’s metrics-based planning approach and the context that produced it.

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Blog

Published
September 6, 2019

Higher Ed’s Missing Link: Turning Your Big Data Into Institutional Change

Most think there’s a tension between access and excellence—you have to choose one of the two. Not so, according to two planners from University of Texas El Paso (UTEP). Read this short recap from their presentation at the SCUP 2019 Annual Conference.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

Higher Ed’s Missing Link

Turning Your Big Data Into Institutional Change

We'll share our metrics-based planning framework—that's producing remarkable outcomes—and explain how you can apply this concept at your institution.
Abstract: Literature points out that big data and analytics (BDA) still fails to positively influence institutional planning—even though it's promoted as a novel approach to improving efficiency and effectiveness. What limits the usefulness of BDA? Researchers point to a lack of conceptual models that translate information into meaningful signals. Nonsense! We're using a metrics-based planning framework that's producing remarkable outcomes. We'll share our framework and how you can apply this concept at your institution.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 1, 1998

How to Institutionalize Strategic Planning

Effective planning requires wide stakeholder participation and dialogue.

From Volume 27 Number 2 | Winter 1998–1999

Abstract: The university faced extraordinary changes in the characteristics of its students and its mission, and the policy environment of its administrative decision making. That context and the strategic planning process undertaken by its leadership to guide rather than react to the changes are outlined. The campus adminstration had three major tasks: (1) to stimulate a more open dialogue about the university's future; (2) to plan a major external grant to ensure an institutional focus rather than a disciplinary one; and (3) to link the institution's academic program review, regional accreditation self-study, and state-mandated strategic planning to campus perceptions of critical issues and the external grant agency's criteria. The planning and evaluation center coordinated and strengthened the university's institutional responses to various external agencies by convincing the campus of the intrinsic value of such a planning process for faculty, students, and staff and by implementing a participatory process for their involvment and contribution to its new direction. The university's model and inital outcomes are described. The approach and exeriences should be relevant for other commuter institutions that are attempting to address issues of accountability and academic excellence for "non-traditional" students.

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