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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
August 5, 2022

Book Review: Shared Leadership in Higher Education

A Framework and Models for Responding to a Changing World

From Volume 50 Number 4 | July–September 2022

Abstract: Shared Leadership in Higher Education: A Framework and Models for Responding to a Changing World
Edited by Elizabeth M. Holcombe, Adrianna J. Kezar, Susan L. Elrod, and Judith A. Ramaley
Stylus Publishing: Sterling, Virginia: 2021
256 pages
ISBN: 978-1642672251

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 8, 2022

Seven Lessons in Inclusive Campus Design

Learn How the University of Kentucky Developed Its First DEI Facilities and Spaces Plan

Institutions are starting to grapple with histories of developing indigenous lands and the legacy of an able-bodied vernacular within campus design that continues to reinforce in-groups and out-groups.

From Volume 50 Number 3 | April–June 2022

Abstract: A global health crisis intersecting with a racial reckoning has led to a renewed commitment to reflect on complex histories and plan for more inclusive futures on many American campuses. Institutions, which benefitted from traditional hierarchies of power, are starting to grapple with histories of developing indigenous lands and the legacy of a western and able-bodied vernacular within campus design that continues to reinforce in-groups and out-groups. The authors are presently leading first-of-their-kind DEI planning initiatives; in this article they unpack how a public institution is meeting their past head-on to plan better futures.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 26, 2022

The Future of Planning is . . .

. . . Aligned, Integrated, and Collaborative Institutional Effectiveness

IE professionals are both translators and integrators—and universities need these people who know how to interpret the data. Within the context of an IIE office, they assist in developing data-informed strategic plans, financial forecasts, enrollment plans, and other assessments of institutional efficacy.

From Volume 50 Number 3 | April–June 2022

Abstract: The institutions that will thrive in the future will be those that use high-quality, relevant mission-driven data as part of their strategic, integrated planning process. Because of this it is imperative to create integrated institutional effectiveness (IIE) offices that serve as the connective tissue among all units within a college or university. The data and expertise of institutional effectiveness can be leveraged to benefit the institution as a whole. In this article, we discuss the value of creating an IIE office and challenges associated with a centralized infrastructure.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
February 25, 2022

Fully Engaged

Integrated Planning Was Leveraged to Optimize Community Participation in the University of California, Berkeley’s Campus Master Plan

The most effective master plans are those that reflect the myriad voices of the institution. Engagement should be informative, inclusive, meaningful, and fun—and should be the product of an integrated process.

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: The most effective master plans are those that reflect the myriad voices of the institution. We’re finding the engagement process is fast becoming as important a product of the plan as the plan itself. Engagement should be informative, inclusive, meaningful, and fun—and should be the product of an integrated process. Leveraging the University of California, Berkeley’s Campus Master Plan as a case study, this article provides a framework for developing custom engagement strategies, and highlights examples, lessons learned, and tips for optimizing meaningful participation.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 22, 2021

Book Review: Campus Crisis Management

A Comprehensive Guide for Practitioners

From Volume 50 Number 1 | October–December 2021

Abstract: Edited by Eugene L. Zdziarski, Norbert W. Dunkel, and J. Michael Rollo
Routledge: Oxfordshire, England: 2021
388 Pages
ISBN-13: 978-0367333720

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
November 15, 2021

Book Review: Big Data on Campus

Data Analytics and Decision Making in Higher Education

From Volume 50 Number 1 | October–December 2021

Abstract: Edited by Karen L. Webber and Henry Y. Zheng
Johns Hopkins University Press: Baltimore: 2020
324 pages
ISBN: 978-1-4214-3903-7

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 7, 2021

Increasing Alumni Giving at HBCUs

Start by Broadening the Job Titles of Those Who Do the Asking

By reviewing historical perspectives and conducting current-day personal interviews, the authors researched ways to engage HBCU alumni in giving back to their alma maters.

From Volume 49 Number 3 | April–June 2021

Abstract: In higher education philanthropy, alumni giving is a tremendously vital aspect, especially for Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Throughout the history of alumni giving, though, HBCUs have not enjoyed the same success in soliciting and cultivating donations as Primarily White Institutions (PWIs) have. We compiled literature and conducted snowball sampling of private HBCU alumni to understand the motivations for giving or not to their alma maters.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 11, 2020

Streamlining the Process of Student Success and Persistence

Curriculum Complexity Analyses Can Deploy Timely Academic Support Services

A combination of course prerequisite simplification and focused efforts by academic advising and tutoring services, when and where needed most, can substantially improve student achievement and degree attainment.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: Curriculum complexity impacts several aspects of student success, including time to degree, persistence, and the accumulation of student debt. This article describes the process of measuring and analyzing course prerequisites and sequencing. It outlines strategies to engage campus leadership and faculty in effectively improving curriculum and ensuring that support services are focused on the greatest area of need.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 8, 2020

‘Colorblind-Spots’ in Campus Design

Planners and Architects Can Offer Solutions That Center on Social Justice

Educational leaders are noting that conventional campus design planning efforts have neglected to include the voices of historically underserved communities. Socio-spatial inquiry can help institutions offer an equity approach to inclusivity and authentic engagement.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: To gain a broader understanding of how educational equity is linked to campus design, architects and planners must critically examine community engagement practices. Using critical race theory (CRT) as a framework has exposed racial exclusion and colorblind practices in traditional planning processes. While outreach strategies have received greater scrutiny, less examined are the questions that direct those activities. If the prevailing understanding of a design problem is informed by colorblind inquiry, then design solutions hold little promise to improve social impact on communities most affected by educational inequity. Socio-spatial inquiry offers an equity approach to inclusive outreach and authentic engagement.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
May 18, 2020

Telling the Untold Stories

George Mason University Frames the Conversation Around Its Institutional Namesake and His Legacy

Through historical study, outreach, and education, undergraduate students at George Mason University began research that developed into the Enslaved Children of George Mason Project. The goal was to broaden the university narrative, encourage discussion about American ideals of equality and freedom, and transform a complex historical legacy and memorial into an inclusive campus place for reflection and dialogue.

From Volume 48 Number 3 | April–June 2020

Abstract: This article discusses the processes and outcomes of recent efforts at George Mason University (GMU) to acknowledge and celebrate the lives of those individuals enslaved by the institution’s namesake. In an era of intense debate surrounding the legacies of historical figures in the United States, GMU seeks to set the example for one approach to dealing with the conversations: community-fostering dialogue. We discuss the use of sculptural elements to create a new monument that sits in discourse with an existing statue of George Mason IV, highlighting how undergraduate student research efforts can be leveraged to address topics of value to today’s campus communities.

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