SCUP
 

Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

FOUND 4 RESOURCES

REFINED BY:

  • Tags: Athletic Facilityx

Clear All
ABSTRACT:  | 
SORT BY:  | 

Published
September 1, 2020

From Lagging to Leading

Bentley University and Boston College Sack Stereotypes About Athletic Facility Sustainability and Energy Performance

An integrated team of cross-discipline collaborators accomplished their objective of creatively reimagining athletic facilities at two institutions for the greater good of each campus and its community. Using sustainable and cost-efficient design opportunities and aligned technologies, they succeeded in countering the outdated stereotype of the athletic building as a lagging energy performer.

From Volume 48 Number 4 | July–September 2020

Abstract: Athletic buildings suffer from a long-held image problem. Fieldhouses, hockey and basketball arenas, and other large indoor competition and practice facilities traditionally lag other campus spaces in energy performance and sustainability. However, because of the size, scale, and location of athletic buildings, there is significant untapped potential as campus planners seek creative ways to implement change initiatives. The authors share lessons learned from their recent experiences applying imaginative, cost-efficient approaches to sports and recreation buildings. In addition to reimagining how the facilities can contribute to the greater good of the entire campus, they demonstrate the value of early cross-discipline collaboration and problem-solving to fulfill shared aspirations.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Delivered
March 16, 2020

2020 Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2020

Planning with Athletics

Balancing Program Demand with Campus Mission and Culture

This session will help you find athletics facilities solutions that benefit your entire campus community and reinforce your institutional mission through understanding the issues facing athletics and identifying new strategic associations.
Abstract: On many campuses, athletics programs continue to isolate student athletes and create exclusivity of facility use. This can create resentment and division on campus and diminish support from the broader campus community. Athletics' growth and demand for dedicated facilities can challenge institutional principles, but through strategic alliances and planning, you can maximize benefits for your campus community, increase efficiencies, and better engage student athletes. This session will help you find solutions that benefit your entire campus community and reinforce your institutional mission through understanding the issues facing athletics and identifying new strategic associations.

Member Price:
$35 | Login

Non-Member Price:
Free

Published
July 1, 2017

Mens Sana in Corpore Sano

Planning for Health and Wellness as a Building Block of Academic Success

Campus planning that encourages a healthy lifestyle also augments scholastic achievement, improving grades and increasing graduation rates.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: Health and wellness centers that encourage all students to be active are replacing the traditional gymnasium complexes on campuses throughout the United States. Studies indicate that regular exercise helps students fight off depression, relieve stress, improve grades, and graduate on time. At Cabrini University, Wallace Roberts & Todd (WRT) architects designed an athletic pavilion that accommodates a wide variety of wellness, exercise, and fitness programs. WRT master planners used design principles that encourage physical activity to frame the campus reorganization so that all members of the campus community could incorporate healthy activity into their daily lives.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Published
October 1, 2014

Discovering Transformative Opportunities for the Athletic Facilities at the University of Pittsburgh

The challenge for many colleges and universities moving forward is to build and renovate the least amount of space for the greatest number of users and uses.

From Volume 43 Number 1 | October–December 2014

Abstract: The University of Pittsburgh is committed to improving its Division I varsity sports venues and intramural sports and recreational facilities to meet the needs of student athletes, the general student body, staff, and faculty. In 2004, the university completed an Athletic and Recreation Facilities Master Plan. Since its completion, the document has guided the university’s development and renovation efforts on the Upper Campus. However, facilities for these programs remain a pressing need. Given its accomplishments since the completion of the 2004 master plan, the university determined that it needed to revisit and revise the plan to address unresolved issues, take on new challenges, and explore new opportunities that achieve the following objectives: strengthen the geographic definition of the university’s athletic campus within the greater context of the campus as a whole; optimize the university’s limited land and facilities assets such as Trees Field, the OC Lot, Petersen Sports Complex, Trees Hall, Fitzgerald Field House, and other potential sites to identify the highest and best use to meet current and future academic, athletic, and recreational program deficiencies; improve efficiencies in existing facilities where space has been vacated due to the construction of new facilities; and determine where consolidation and cross-departmental sharing is warranted and where space is suited for renovation and reuse.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access