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Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Published
July 16, 2021

Supporting the Whole Student

New Models for Integrated Learning Centers

In this session, we’ll share how the College of Marin and Chabot College's integrated learning centers are serving changing student populations using an inclusive library design approach.
Abstract: Even as 'non-traditional' students become the norm at community colleges, too many campus spaces and services fail to meet their needs. Inclusive engagement strategies can help ensure that we design for today's students. We'll share how the College of Marin and Chabot College's integrated learning centers are serving changing student populations using an inclusive library design approach. You'll learn how incorporating inclusive engagement and outreach in your planning process can result in facilities that allow students to better navigate the 'hidden curriculum' of college life and strengthen campus cohesion.

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Non-Member Price:
$50

Delivered
June 22, 2021

Libraries in Shaping the Future of Higher Education

Part One: Libraries’ Leadership in Transforming Student Success

How can institutions leverage librarians as educational partners, complementing the classroom experience, to ensure students from all walks of life have a strong net of academic support?
Abstract: With societal inequalities in high relief, exacerbated by the pandemic and with lasting effect for many students, institutions must seek novel ways to meet needs and support success. This requires more concerted efforts to mitigate, and ensure we do not perpetuate, the barriers students face. How can institutions leverage librarians as educational partners, complementing the classroom experience, to ensure students from all walks of life have a strong net of academic support?

This is part one of a three-part webinar series.

Member Price:
Free

Non-Member Price:
Free

Published
June 14, 2021

Good Academic Planning Is What Happens . . .

. . . When Opportunity Meets with Integration

From Volume 49 Number 3 | April–June 2021

Abstract: The division of Academic Affairs at the University of West Georgia became involved with the Society for College and University Planning and integrated planning over four years ago. The result was slowly integrating academic planning with facilities, accreditation, budget, student affairs, and student success. Just as Thomas Edison was probably not thinking about integrated planning when he was quoted on planning, we had no idea how fruitful our efforts would become. We enhanced and assessed student scheduling, learning spaces, faculty support, and student success and support services in a meaningful way that resulted in positive and measurable outcomes for improving learning and reducing costs.

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Delivered
April 27, 2021

The Art and Science of Supporting Adult Learners

Actionable Steps & Strategies

More than ever, nontraditional students and adult learners are making up more and more of the student body at colleges and universities across the country. Learn how to effectively stand out from other institutions who are making mistakes in 10 key areas with the adult learner population.
Abstract: This was a free webinar hosted by CAEL, AASCU, and SCUP.

Students over the age of 25 are the fastest-growing segment in higher education. From 2000 to 2012, the enrollment of students over the age of 25 increased by 35%, and between 2012 and 2019, the share of students over age 25 increased by another 23%.

Even though more adult learners and nontraditional students are enrolling in higher education, many institutional practices do not consider the unique needs of this population. The best adult learner strategies not only increase student satisfaction, they improve enrollment rates and adult degree attainment.

More than ever, nontraditional students and adult learners are making up more and more of the student body at colleges and universities across the country. Institutions can create equitable pathways that can help overcome disparities in adult learning, and better prepare themselves for adult students who have been disconnected from higher education.

Learn how to effectively stand out from other institutions who are making mistakes in 10 key areas with the adult learner population.

Member Price:
Free

Non-Member Price:
Free

Published
March 26, 2021

Keep on Keepin’ on

Customized Retention Practices Helped Low Income and Single Mom Students to Persist

A support program for low-income and/or single-mother students to improve their persistence and retention was revisited 15 years after it had been launched at Charter Oak State College. Did follow-up with the graduates show that the effort had aided the former participants in obtaining their college degree? Had the collaboration between the institution’s Academic Services, Enrollment Management, and Financial Aid departments—and the support they offered—help the students to persevere? Based on survey results, was the program still of value, and what improvements needed to be made?

From Volume 49 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: This article is based on follow-up survey research from a doctoral case study that highlighted effective retention practices for low-income and/or single mothers who were students within the Women in Transition (WIT) program at Charter Oak State College. The concept of retention in this instance is an enrollment management practice aimed at maintaining a student population while aiding the institution in sustaining organizational success. Emphasis is placed on the retention concepts of social and academic integration that enabled the specific population to persist and succeed.

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Published
February 9, 2021

Leveraging Institutional Planning to Benefit Latinx Students

Racially Disaggregated and Actionable Data Improve Community College Transfer Success

How can institutional planners make a difference for underrepresented minority students? Senior administrators at East Los Angeles College addressed inequities in Latinx student transfer rates with data-backed culturally-relevant strategies.

From Volume 49 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: California Community Colleges, since 2014, have explicitly targeted retention, transfer, and completion outcomes through a mandated planning process supported by newly-allocated fiscal resources. The policy focuses on equity-driven institutional planning that identifies and addresses disparities for specific groups (e.g., Latinx students, foster youths, veterans). This article shares insight from five years of case study research, exploring how senior administrators address Latinx student transfer inequity through new culturally-relevant strategies. Within California, Latinx students comprise the largest share of transfer-aspirants, but they have significantly lower rates of academic success. Key lessons are shared to leverage planning efforts to improve outcomes for underrepresented minority students.

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Published
December 11, 2020

Streamlining the Process of Student Success and Persistence

Curriculum Complexity Analyses Can Deploy Timely Academic Support Services

A combination of course prerequisite simplification and focused efforts by academic advising and tutoring services, when and where needed most, can substantially improve student achievement and degree attainment.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: Curriculum complexity impacts several aspects of student success, including time to degree, persistence, and the accumulation of student debt. This article describes the process of measuring and analyzing course prerequisites and sequencing. It outlines strategies to engage campus leadership and faculty in effectively improving curriculum and ensuring that support services are focused on the greatest area of need.

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Delivered
July 22, 2020

2020 Annual Conference | July 2020

Planning for Equity

Supporting Students Now and in the Fall

Come join our panelists for an in-depth discussion of research into student inequities and how their institutions plan to improve the student support system on their campus this fall.
Abstract: The campus exists to serve as a support network for students, but the COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the variety of ways in which some students remain underserved. This session will discuss the equity and access issues amplified by the pandemic and how institutions are adapting this fall's programs and environments to alleviate these issues. Come join our panelists for an in-depth discussion of research into student inequities and how their institutions plan to improve the student support system on their campus this fall.

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Non-Member Price:
$50

Delivered
June 26, 2020

Voices from the Field: Episode #16

Helping Vulnerable Students Meet Basic Needs

From The Hope Center at Temple University, Paula Umaña discusses caring and communication: the need to identify your most vulnerable students, then ensure that available assistance is visible and easy for them to access.
Abstract: Students need more than hand sanitizing stations and plexiglass. They need their basic needs addressed. Many college students are part of a vulnerable population with a fragile hold on basic needs like housing, food, and transportation. Temple University’s Hope Center for College, Community, and Justice compiled an extensive set of resources for institutions to use to assist students in locating and applying for necessary aid.

In this episode, The Hope Center’s Paula Umaña discusses caring and communication: the need to identify your most vulnerable students, then ensure that available assistance is visible and easy for them to access..

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Free

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Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

Adapt or Perish

Equipping Students With Workforce Skills

This session explores critical education/workforce gaps in higher education and how they can be addressed through academic planning and learning environments.
Abstract: 89% of employers say colleges are not adequately preparing students for the workforce. This session explores critical education/workforce gaps in higher education and how they can be addressed through academic planning and learning environments. We'll share data from 11 national studies and our longitudinal research that identifies critical workforce competencies where colleges have an opportunity to raise their value proposition. You will learn innovative strategies and processes to realign academic programming, support services, and physical facilities with critical competencies for post-graduation success.

Member Price:
Free

Non-Member Price:
Free