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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Published
March 18, 2021

Book Review: Academic Library Makerspaces

A Practical Guide to Planning, Collaborating, and Supporting Campus Innovation

Built on the authors’ wide-ranging examination of the literature and examples drawn from a variety of higher education institutions, this book offers a detailed roadmap of steps and strategies for planning these facilities and successfully integrating them into the academic fabric of an institution.

From Volume 49 Number 2 | January–March 2021

Abstract: by Katy B. Mathuews and Daniel J. Harper
Rowman & Littlefield: Lanham, MD: 2020
166 pages
ISBN: 978-1-4408-7206-6
ISBN (e-book): 978-1-4408-7207-4

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Delivered
May 13, 2020

Coffee Chat: Maker Movement

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Amid the pandemic, makers on campuses across the world have pitched in by crafting 3-D printed face shields, ventilator components, and other life-saving innovations. The value of the maker movement is apparent; but how do we adjust maker spaces to a quarantined, social-distancing world? SCUP members Ludmilla Pavlova-Gillham and Heather Taylor moderated this discussion.
Abstract: Amid the pandemic, makers on campuses across the world have pitched in by crafting 3-D printed face shields, ventilator components, and other life-saving innovations. The value of the maker movement is apparent; but how do we adjust maker spaces to a quarantined, social-distancing world?

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Delivered
October 6, 2019

2019 Southern Regional Conference | October 2019

Planning for Future Learning

NCA&T Engineering Research and Innovation Complex

The session examines how North Carolina A&T State University (NCA&T) created an interdisciplinary engineering research and innovation facility centered around maker and fabrication spaces.
Abstract: Interdisciplinary learning thrives on a foundation of cross-departmental strength. Designing facilities that accommodate a variety of teaching modalities and allow different disciplines to share resources can have a positive impact on future learning, teaching, and research. The session examines how North Carolina A&T State University (NCA&T) created an interdisciplinary engineering research and innovation facility centered around maker and fabrication spaces. You will learn about our integrated project team approach, how we secured buy-in from stakeholders, and how we translated functional space needs into innovative places.

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Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

Planning and Designing for Innovation

A Hackathon

This session is all about these innovation buildings—their design, use, and operations.
Abstract: Innovation centers, maker spaces, incubators, and idea factories get a lot of buzz, but what are they really and how can they be designed most effectively? This session is all about these innovation buildings—their design, use, and operations. We'll explore strategies and best practices, then roll up our sleeves and start designing! After we review the range of innovation buildings universities are creating, you will be asked to tackle a specific case study design problem within a small group.

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Published
October 1, 2018

Designing for STEM

California Community Colleges Are Helping Shape the STEM Workforce of the Future

Community colleges are developing sophisticated simulation laboratories, makerspaces, and innovation centers to prepare students to successfully enter the STEM workforce and meet the needs of high-tech employers.

From Volume 47 Number 1 | October–December 2018

Abstract: The demand for graduates and technicians in the academic fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is influencing the design of specialized educational facilities in community colleges. Community colleges are increasingly aligning their academic programs to the specific economic development priorities and projected demand for skilled labor in the geographic regions they serve. It is expected that partnerships with local industry will increasingly shape curriculum development and facilities design. This trend is rapidly developing in California, where community colleges are incorporating sophisticated simulation laboratories, makerspaces, and innovation centers outfitted with advanced infrastructure and equipment, along with spaces that support the full spectrum of competencies required for graduates to succeed in the STEM labor market.

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Published
October 1, 2017

The Value of Higher Education Academic Makerspaces for Accreditation and Beyond

Institutions of higher education are incorporating makerspaces and skills on their campuses in support of institutional goals and accreditation requirements.

From Volume 46 Number 1 | October–December 2017

Abstract: Over the last decade, many academic institutions, from elementary schools to universities, have added academic makerspaces to their campuses. This development has enabled students and faculty to come together and collaborate, design, fabricate, and learn in shared spaces. This article describes how the creation and incorporation of academic makerspaces in a university learning ecosystem can help achieve accreditation. Specific examples are drawn from ABET’s engineering accreditation criteria. The article also explores how academic makerspaces can enhance teaching objectives and student outcomes by providing a space for learning technological skills within social contexts in interdisciplinary communities of practice.

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Published
July 1, 2017

Teaching, Learning, Doing in Collaborative Spaces

The intermingling of undergraduate students with grad students, post-docs, faculty, and commercial interests in one innovative facility results in better academic experiences.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: Makerspaces designed for collaborative learning are appearing on campuses throughout the United States, including at Drexel University. These spaces succeed because they permit students to collaborate, observe, and learn from professors and peers. Unique to the Drexel project is the intermingling of engineering undergraduates, graduate students, post-docs, faculty, and commercial interests in one facility with laboratories, machine-shop equipment, and informal study areas. Facilities that give students great visibility into nearby research, contain areas where they can take breaks without leaving the building, and lend themselves to informal encounters with peers, faculty, and others result in better academic experiences for undergraduates.

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Published
July 1, 2017

University-Industry Collaborations Are Driving Creation of Next-Generation Learning Space

New spaces, ranging from fabrication and prototyping studios to innovation districts, reflect a growing entrepreneurship and maker culture and give students the tools they need to succeed in a rapidly evolving marketplace.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: Industry and academia are partnering like never before as entrepreneurship and maker culture become more important to our economy and a regular fixture in higher education curricula. With the influx of allied industry partnerships, evolving pedagogies, entrepreneurship programs, and a maker culture comes a pressing need for new spaces, ranging from fabrication and prototyping studios to innovation districts devoted to new kinds of research partnerships. Schools like the University of Washington, Babson College, and Arizona State University are leading the way on new collaborations. In this article, Sasaki planners and urban designers examine how design disruption will guide the development of campuses that enable 21st-century teaching, learning, and research paradigms.

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Published
January 1, 2017

Crafting an Innovation Landscape

The Innovation Landscape Framework is a tool for the integrated planning of initiatives that support innovation across campuses.

From Volume 45 Number 2 | January–March 2017

Abstract: As efforts to stimulate innovation spring up across campuses, institutions need a comprehensive planning framework for the integrated planning of initiatives that support innovation. The campus can be viewed as an Innovation Landscape, and settings for collaborative creative activity—both physical and virtual—can infuse the campus fabric and become part of the daily experience of users. The Innovation Landscape Framework is a tool to help coordinate physical planning with organizational initiatives, engage a wide range of stakeholders, and enable a more widespread culture of innovation.

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Published
July 1, 2016

Designing Innovative Campuses for Tomorrow’s Students

Campus design and architecture will be the prime catalysts for transforming universities into our society’s engines of growth.

From Volume 44 Number 4 | July–September 2016

Abstract: “Designing Innovative Campuses For Tomorrow’s Students” explores increasing investment by higher education institutions in new programs and facilities that boost on-campus innovation and entrepreneurship. This trend is a response, in part, to the changing expectations and demands of Millennial and Generation Z students and their future employers. The impact of this movement, though, goes far beyond those constituencies—changing everything from campus housing to the economic development role of higher education institutions. The examples of Clemson University’s Watt Family Innovation Center and the University of Florida’s Infinity Hall are provided to illustrate the scope of influence and success of these changes.

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