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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Webinar Recordings

Published
July 9, 2020

Strategic Planning Responses to the Pandemic

In this webinar, Jean Robinson from University of Massachusetts-Lowell and Dave Proulx from Rhode Island School of Design share how their campuses have been planning for this fall, and reflect on the impacts today’s urgent decision making could bring to the future campus.

This is part of the series “Less Talk, More Action: Tactical Topics to Return to Campus.”

Abstract: With the entire academic community scrambling to establish what higher education looks like this fall, planning has been even harder than usual. And yet the pandemic opens opportunities to consider an entirely new set of choices previously unavailable to those guiding their institutions forward. Each and every urgent decision being made on campus today has the potential to define an entirely new future campus. The drivers for those decisions may or may not be creating a desirable new future.d

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

On-campus Student Housing

Compare Approaches for Construction and Delivery

Come learn from campus facilities planning and student affairs officials, who will address the pros and cons of different delivery methods (P3, purchase/renovation, and conventional construction) from the perspective of up-front costs, operating and maintenance factors, student experience, and functionality.
Abstract: On-campus living has been linked to student success and is a key factor in admissions decisions. As campuses look to expand and improve their housing inventories in a challenging fiscal environment, there are more options than ever available. One institution will share its recent experiences with several of these options. The University of Massachusetts (UMass) Lowell has more than doubled its on-campus housing inventory in the past five years using a combination of P3, real estate acquisitions, and conventional construction. This session will compare the relative benefits and particular challenges in utilizing these types of housing delivery methods. Come learn from campus facilities planning and student affairs officials, who will address the pros and cons of different delivery methods (P3, purchase/renovation, and conventional construction) from the perspective of up-front costs, operating and maintenance factors, student experience, and functionality.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
March 27, 2019

2019 Pacific Regional Conference | March 2019

Performance-based Standards Foster Creative Solutions for Environments Supporting Critical Discourse

We'll discuss how to rethink the processes for creating and implementing campus standards, focusing on the “why” of campus standards while balancing life-cycle costs and ease of operation.
Abstract: Design standards define what makes a campus unique without limiting creativity. This session highlights the trials and tribulations of defining what should and should not be in the campus standards. We'll discuss how to rethink the processes for creating and implementing campus standards, focusing on the “why” of campus standards while balancing life-cycle costs and ease of operation. We'll also look at how to better implement and communicate the standards, increasing the likelihood that they are incorporated into projects.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
March 27, 2019

2019 Pacific Regional Conference | March 2019

Leveraging the On-Campus Admissions Center to Showcase Institutional Values

We will discuss the planning and design of Colorado University's Center for Academic Success and Engagement (CASE), providing an example of thoughtful intra-institutional discourse focused on institutional values.
Abstract: In the competitive higher education landscape, a prospective student's campus experience is a defining moment in a daunting decision-making process. Colorado University (CU) embedded its new admissions center and auditorium in an academic building central to the campus. CU’s strategy impacts both prospective students and influences broader institutional life. We will discuss the planning and design of CU's Center for Academic Success and Engagement (CASE), providing an example of thoughtful intra-institutional discourse focused on institutional values.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2004

Solving Campus Parking Shortages: New Solutions for an Old Problem

Recent major enrollment and construction trends on campus mean that, once again, the demand for parking is increasing at the same time as supply is being eroded. Universities and colleges, however, are able to achieve more integrated parking and transportation policies than are other large institutions.

From Volume 33 Number 1 | September–November 2004

Abstract: Universities and colleges across the country are faced with growth in the campus population and the loss of surface parking lots for new buildings. The response of many institutions is to build new garages with the assumption that parking demand ratios will remain the same. Such an approach, however, can be extremely expensive—upwards of $2,000 per net new space annually. In many cases, a mix of parking and demand reduction programs—such as shuttles, bicycle and pedestrian improvements, and financial incentives not to drive—can accommodate growth at a lower cost per trip. A balanced approach will also tend to support other goals, from improving town-gown relations to maintaining debt capacity. Demand management strategies have been employed by institutions for many years. However, it is less common for a cost-benefit analysis to be undertaken comparing them with new parking construction. Using examples from universities in California and Colorado, this article demonstrates a methodology to inform basic decisions on the amount of parking required to cater to campus growth, which can be incorporated into campus master planning.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2003

The Road Less Traveled: Sustainable Transportation for Campuses

The high costs of parking expansion have propelled many institutions toward a transportation demand management strategy to shift many trips from single occupant automobiles to other modes of travel.

From Volume 31 Number 3 | March–May 2003

Abstract: This article provides a survey of innovative approaches to campus transportation in the United States. The high costs of parking expansion have propelled many institutions toward a transportation demand management strategy, using parking pricing, transit passes for students and employees, and investment in bicycle infrastructure to shift many trips from single-occupant automobiles to other modes of travel. These institutions have experienced multiple benefits, including lower transportation costs, lower environmental impacts, and improved community relations.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2003

Environmental Management Systems: A Framework for Planning Green Campuses

Employing environmental management systems can help institutions address campus environmental impacts by providing a structure for assessing and improving the sustainability of all facets of campus operations.

From Volume 31 Number 3 | March–May 2003

Abstract: Drawing on recent survey data from the National Wildlife Federation and other publications, this article explains what an environmental management system is and identifies its components; examines how environmental management systems have been applied and adapted to higher education settings; reports on trends in implementation; and illustrates how the environmental management system can help in planning green campuses. It addresses such issues as environmental policy, training, compliance, performance evaluation, staffing, and assessment within the higher education context.

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