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Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
October 4, 2021

Rejuvenation

Investing in Existing Residence Halls for Bright Futures

In this session, we'll provide you with practical strategies that you can apply at your institution as you explore the possibilities of renovating existing student housing facilities.
Abstract: Almost every institution has existing residence halls that they could upgrade for a fraction of the cost of building new. As institutions seek to meet student housing needs, they should consider renovating existing buildings as a viable strategy for creating state-of-the-art facilities. Taking this path can extend building life, attract students, and save capital. In this session, we'll provide you with practical strategies that you can apply at your institution as you explore the possibilities of renovating existing student housing facilities.

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$50

Conference Recordings

Published
April 30, 2021

2021 Pacific Regional Conference | April–June 2021

Mindful Redesign for New and Effective Learning Environments

Join us to discuss what our campuses are planning for the immediate and distant future of teaching and learning.
Abstract: This session will focus on how changes in academic planning—accelerated in large part due to COVID-19—are resulting in new physical and virtual frameworks for learning. These range from enhanced online platforms to flexible hybrid environments, including the reappropriation and redesign of ‘found spaces,’ such as valuable and underutilized exterior zones on our existing campuses. Join us to discuss what our campuses are planning for the immediate and distant future of teaching and learning.

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Non-Member Price:
$119

Report

Published
November 23, 2020

The Connected Campus

Building Long-Term Value and Agility by Connecting Offerings, Organizations and Operations

Campus environments play a vital role in student success. By making changes to their combination of spaces, institutions can respond to the shifts transforming higher education. Elliot Felix shares how colleges and universities can prepare for a more blended world by bringing together the digital and physical, enabling greater diversity and inclusion, and implementing flexible structures, staffing, space, and services. Sponsored Content: Knoll and brightspot strategy.
Abstract: Historic separations that defined higher education are dissolving: research is more interdisciplinary, online and on-campus learning are converging, wet and dry labs are blending, teaching and research overlap, and academia forges relationships with corporate partners. Institutions, by improving how they connect what they offer, how they are organized, and how they operate, can build value and agility to better assist their people on campus. Real-world examples in this white paper from Knoll and brightspot strategy discuss how campus spaces support student success, including how to fully use the campus; creating spaces that sustain diverse and flexible ways of working; thinking phygitally; and creating environments where today’s purpose-driven and entrepreneurial students (Gen Z) will thrive as they prepare to enter the workforce.

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Free

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Free

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2019

Relic or Relevant

Is Stanford University’s Main Quad Still a Place for Community Engagement?

The university’s founders specified that the space that would become the Main Quad, along with its buildings, should facilitate human discourse and connection. Has it reached across generations to remain an active place for student life?

From Volume 48 Number 1 | October–December 2019

Abstract: The quadrangle is a medieval-European legacy adapted by American universities during the nineteenth century. Given technological advances and changes in society, is the nineteenth-century icon changing? Will the American campus look different in the future? With a selected group of students, faculty, alumni, and staff, we discussed the relevance—past, present, and future—of Stanford University’s Main Quadrangle—as a venue for discourse and community engagement. Despite it being a relic, we concluded that the Main Quad continues to be the heart of the Stanford campus community.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

Issues in Workplace Design (and How Innovative Universities Address Them)

Abstract: On the average campus, office space accounts for more square footage than classrooms, instructional and research labs combined. Accordingly, its design and utilization can have significant campus impact. This panel discussion addresses the challenges that institutions face when rethinking their approach to workplace design. We will provide guidance on planning, programming, and design strategies to align workplaces with educational mission, respond to fiscal pressures, and compete for talent.

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Free

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Free

Conference Presentations

Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

Decarbonize Your Campus Through Building Electrification

Abstract: The path to carbon neutrality is clear: electrify everything and procure renewable energy. How to get to 100% electric power is less clear. Stanford University has been focused on this challenge, committing to all-electric buildings by June 2019. This session will give attendees a clear road map and strategies for converting the energy your buildings use from gas to electric—whether the energy heats the building, glass beakers, or dinner.

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Free

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Free

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2019

Planning, Utopia, and Heritage in the Design of Campuses

The University of Virginia as a Paradigm

The fusion between utopia and planning has influenced both the interior of university enclosures and the outside.

From Volume 47 Number 3 | April–June 2019

Abstract: Human education is an experience that has a spatial dimension. To optimize the design/architectural component as a factor of excellence, historically, the coordination of two attitudes at universities has been a vital heritage: utopia and planning. Utopia is the energy used by universities to conceive and evolve their physical establishments. By the process of planning, campuses have undergone a long-term evolution of their built heritage, focusing on those where the hallmark is their human scale. This article illustrates briefly the application of these concepts in five cases, which have been culturally recognized as UNESCO World Heritage sites. However, it explores in depth one of those: The University of Virginia.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
March 27, 2019

2019 Pacific Regional Conference | March 2019

Stanford’s Main Quad

“Relic or Relevant” in Discourse, Pedagogy, and Community Today?

This presentation will address how a strong campus identity can create community engagement, facilitate discourse, and influence pedagogy through architecture that recalls the past, is relevant to the present, and can adapt to the future.
Abstract: Stanford University's historic Main Quadrangle reflects a unique design and mission as envisioned by the founders and communicated through its architecture. But does this model still contribute to student engagement and learning? We will discuss the pedagogical, civic discourse, and community function of the Stanford Quadrangle and Memorial Church, highlighting perspectives of students, faculty, staff and alumni. This presentation will address how a strong campus identity can create community engagement, facilitate discourse, and influence pedagogy through architecture that recalls the past, is relevant to the present, and can adapt to the future.

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Free

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Free

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
January 1, 2018

An Exploration of Administrative Bloat in American Higher Education

Administrative bloat, the ballooning growth of administrative functions and personnel in U.S. higher education, is the unintended consequence of several factors and can be mitigated to some extent through deliberate strategies.

From Volume 46 Number 2 | January–March 2018

Abstract: This article evaluates administrative bloat, the ballooning growth of administrative functions and personnel, in American higher education. This evaluation was undertaken through a review of the available literature describing administrative bloat. Though unintentional, increased spending and government requirements for accountability may have contributed to overall growth and cost in higher education. Similarly, the changing composition of faculty—in terms of tenure-track faculty, annual contracts, and adjunct faculty—may have also played a role in the increased influence that administration has over campus policy and curricular decisions. Strategies to mitigate the cost of administrative bloat and to balance campus decisions between faculty and administration are suggested.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2014

Enhancing Campus Sustainability Through SITES and Socially Equitable Design

The Socially Equitable category represents a unique and often missed opportunity for academic institutions to further their commitment to sustainable practices.

From Volume 42 Number 4 | July–September 2014

Abstract: Sustainability guidelines for campuses typically focus on the environmental, structural, and organizational aspects of colleges and universities. The Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES) expands the definition of campus sustainability by including “Socially Equitable” design guidelines that consider how people interact with and within campus landscapes. Landscapes that afford (1) mental restoration and (2) social interaction become sustainable under the SITES definition. This study conducted at Agnes Scott College and The University of Georgia tests the criteria associated with these guidelines to determine their relevance and impact. Through mapping exercises, direct observation, and a questionnaire survey, data were collected from 120 students to determine which “sustainable” criteria are relevant to campus landscapes. The findings confirm the criteria listed in the SITES guidelines and introduce additional criteria to consider for enhancing Socially Equitable design standards on campus.

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