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Learning Resources

Your Higher Education Planning Library

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Conference Recordings

Published
March 18, 2021

2021 North Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2021

The Future Campus

A Dialogue with Three Institutions and Learning Technologist

A panel of three institutions and a learning technologist will offer their diverse perspectives on these issues and how they're influencing the physical and virtual campus environment: an unprecedented pandemic; rapidly-accelerating climate change; a mobile technology-enabled society; and critical issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion
Abstract: Higher education will shape its future through its response to this critical moment: an unprecedented pandemic; rapidly-accelerating climate change; a mobile technology-enabled society; and critical issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion. As new values, core issues, and questions continue to emerge, institutions must face these challenges by weighing different impacts and shifting priorities. A panel of three institutions and a learning technologist will offer their diverse perspectives on these issues and how they're influencing the physical and virtual campus environment. Come join the dialogue and adopt an inquiry-based mindset to proactively plan for a more agile and resilient future campus.

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Report

Published
November 23, 2020

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The Connected Campus

Building Long-Term Value and Agility by Connecting Offerings, Organizations and Operations

Campus environments play a vital role in student success. By making changes to their combination of spaces, institutions can respond to the shifts transforming higher education. Elliot Felix shares how colleges and universities can prepare for a more blended world by bringing together the digital and physical, enabling greater diversity and inclusion, and implementing flexible structures, staffing, space, and services. Sponsored Content: Knoll and brightspot strategy.
Abstract: Historic separations that defined higher education are dissolving: research is more interdisciplinary, online and on-campus learning are converging, wet and dry labs are blending, teaching and research overlap, and academia forges relationships with corporate partners. Institutions, by improving how they connect what they offer, how they are organized, and how they operate, can build value and agility to better assist their people on campus. Real-world examples in this white paper from Knoll and brightspot strategy discuss how campus spaces support student success, including how to fully use the campus; creating spaces that sustain diverse and flexible ways of working; thinking phygitally; and creating environments where today’s purpose-driven and entrepreneurial students (Gen Z) will thrive as they prepare to enter the workforce.

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Conference Recordings

Published
July 22, 2020

2020 Annual Conference | July 2020

Campus-Wide Accessibility in Long-Term Planning and COVID-19 Response

This session will discuss successful strategies for accessibility planning—both long-term and during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Abstract: How accessible is your campus? How accessible will it be during its COVID-19 operations? Campus-wide accessibility has a profound impact on student experience, yet institutions of higher education often struggle to provide accessible environments. This session will discuss successful strategies for accessibility planning—both long-term and during the COVID-19 pandemic. We'll discuss how to approach COVID-19 social distancing strategies in terms of program and spatial access, and key accessibility requirements to keep in mind when adapting different facilities types (residence halls, dining facilities, classrooms, etc).

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Webinar Recordings

Published
June 3, 2020

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Impact of COVID-19 on Campus

An Overview

Panelists Michelle Maheu, Wellesley College, and Rear Admiral Francis X. McDonald, Massachusetts Maritime Academy, shared their insights about developing response processes and the potential outcomes on their respective campuses, especially when making decisions when information is limited and the variables are unknown. This session was moderated by Deirdre Fernandes, a reporter with the Boston Globe.

This is the first installment of the series “Less Talk, More Action: Tactical Topics to Return to Campus.”

Abstract: Panelists Michelle Maheu, Wellesley College, and Rear Admiral Francis X. McDonald, Massachusetts Maritime Academy, shared their insights about developing response processes and the potential outcomes on their respective campuses, especially when making decisions when information is limited and the variables are unknown. This session was moderated by Deirdre Fernandes, a reporter with the Boston Globe, who has authored recent articles related to the impact of COVID-19 on Boston campuses.

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Conference Presentations

Published
March 8, 2019

2019 North Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2019

From “Breaking Bad” to Breaking Norms

Transform Thinking and Reinvigorate Campus Relationships

We will demonstrate how advances in modular building delivery are being applied to sophisticated buildings (including BL2 and vivarium) such that users perceive them as an improvement to the current condition.
Abstract: Wellesley College enabled the revitalization of their largest academic building, the science center, by transforming the way people thought about temporary classrooms—from "breaking bad" to breaking norms. We will demonstrate how advances in modular building delivery are being applied to sophisticated buildings (including BL2 and vivarium) such that users perceive them as an improvement to the current condition. Come learn how to be better a problem-solver and be able to detect flaws-in-thinking before they become flaws-in-doing.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2005

Campus Chapels Make A Comeback: Planning for the Adaptive Reuse of Campus Chapels

Campus heritage, a growing interest in spirituality among multidenominational students, the need for multiple use of student spaces are fueling a closer look at campus chapels. This article takes a look at those factors and issues to be addressed in the renovation and reuse of such buildings.

From Volume 33 Number 3 | March–May 2005

Abstract: Campus chapels once bespoke a school’s curriculum, defined the student body, contributed to ambiance, and served as a recruitment tool for parents looking to religion to influence their children’s character. As schools strayed from their religious roots, encountered pressing program needs, and faced funding concerns, many of these rarely used buildings fell into disrepair. In the last few years, efforts to preserve an institution’s heritage, maximize space, and address spirituality have led schools to consider restoring and reusing campus chapels. This article focuses on keeping the chapel’s original design intent while capitalizing on its strengths to upgrade the building and supplement its usage.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2000

Planning for Interdisciplinary Integration

Increasingly, institutions are constructing unified science centers -- the physical counterpart of multidisciplinary curricula.

From Volume 29 Number 1 | Fall 2000

Abstract: While it was once common to find separate buildings dedicated to the study and research of chemistry, biology, physics, and the earth sciences, there is a current movement in college and university settings toward unifying the science disciplines in one building or complex. This article addresses, in detail, this trend toward unification by discussing the driving forces behind the trend, the benefits of integrated science facilities, the challenges of the planning and design process, and the intricacies of the design approach.

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