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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Published
November 23, 2020

The Connected Campus

Building Long-Term Value and Agility by Connecting Offerings, Organizations and Operations

Campus environments play a vital role in student success. By making changes to their combination of spaces, institutions can respond to the shifts transforming higher education. Elliot Felix shares how colleges and universities can prepare for a more blended world by bringing together the digital and physical, enabling greater diversity and inclusion, and implementing flexible structures, staffing, space, and services. Sponsored Content: Knoll and brightspot strategy.
Abstract: Historic separations that defined higher education are dissolving: research is more interdisciplinary, online and on-campus learning are converging, wet and dry labs are blending, teaching and research overlap, and academia forges relationships with corporate partners. Institutions, by improving how they connect what they offer, how they are organized, and how they operate, can build value and agility to better assist their people on campus. Real-world examples in this white paper from Knoll and brightspot strategy discuss how campus spaces support student success, including how to fully use the campus; creating spaces that sustain diverse and flexible ways of working; thinking phygitally; and creating environments where today’s purpose-driven and entrepreneurial students (Gen Z) will thrive as they prepare to enter the workforce.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2005

Campus Chapels Make A Comeback: Planning for the Adaptive Reuse of Campus Chapels

Campus heritage, a growing interest in spirituality among multidenominational students, the need for multiple use of student spaces are fueling a closer look at campus chapels. This article takes a look at those factors and issues to be addressed in the renovation and reuse of such buildings.

From Volume 33 Number 3 | March–May 2005

Abstract: Campus chapels once bespoke a school’s curriculum, defined the student body, contributed to ambiance, and served as a recruitment tool for parents looking to religion to influence their children’s character. As schools strayed from their religious roots, encountered pressing program needs, and faced funding concerns, many of these rarely used buildings fell into disrepair. In the last few years, efforts to preserve an institution’s heritage, maximize space, and address spirituality have led schools to consider restoring and reusing campus chapels. This article focuses on keeping the chapel’s original design intent while capitalizing on its strengths to upgrade the building and supplement its usage.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2000

Planning for Interdisciplinary Integration

Increasingly, institutions are constructing unified science centers -- the physical counterpart of multidisciplinary curricula.

From Volume 29 Number 1 | Fall 2000

Abstract: While it was once common to find separate buildings dedicated to the study and research of chemistry, biology, physics, and the earth sciences, there is a current movement in college and university settings toward unifying the science disciplines in one building or complex. This article addresses, in detail, this trend toward unification by discussing the driving forces behind the trend, the benefits of integrated science facilities, the challenges of the planning and design process, and the intricacies of the design approach.

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