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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Published
February 28, 2022

Transformation Best Practices in the Decade Ahead

Inexorable challenges demand that higher education transform . . . and that transformation needs to start now. Learn more about these challenges and the knowledge, skills, and capabilities an institution needs to transform in the coming decade from the authors of the new book Transforming for Turbulent Times: An Action Agenda for Higher Education Leaders.

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Published
January 25, 2022

Transforming for Turbulent Times

An Action Agenda for Higher Education Leaders

Transforming for Turbulent Times: An Action Agenda for Higher Education Leaders can prepare your institution for the new learning ecosystem that will revolutionize work and learning by 2030. This book outlines a proven, eight-step process for planning, leading, navigating, and orchestrating the transformation necessary to thrive in the new world of knowledge, work, and learning. Whatever your role in your college, university, or learning enterprise, you’ll learn the principles, techniques, and actions that will make you indispensable to its transformation in these turbulent times.
Abstract: Higher education is entering a period of unparalleled turbulence. By 2030, a global knowledge, work, and learning ecosystem will revolutionize work and learning. It will empower individuals to fuse learning, living, and work over 60-year time spans. Tens of millions of additional learners—or even more—will be added to the global learning force. To compete in this rapidly expanding arena, traditional institutions will need to transform, starting now.

Transforming for Turbulent Times: An Action Agenda for Higher Education Leaders will help you support your institution in its efforts to rise to these challenges.

This book outlines a proven, eight-step process for planning, leading, navigating, and orchestrating the transformations necessary to thrive in this new ecosystem. Whatever your role in your college, university, or learning enterprise, you’ll learn the principles, techniques, and actions that will make you indispensable to its transformation in these turbulent times.

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Conference Recordings

Published
October 4, 2021

Learning From A Living Building

Facing (Un)foreseen Challenges

The Kendeda Building, a deep green LEED Platinum Living Building, offers many lessons learned and best practices regarding net-positive water, energy, and waste that you can use to fight climate change and COVID-19 on your campus.
Abstract: At a time when institutions must change the status quo in their approach to addressing the climate crisis through the campus built environment, the Kendeda Building at the Georgia Institute of Technology shows us that successful change is possible. The Kendeda Building, a deep green LEED Platinum Living Building, offers many lessons learned and best practices regarding net-positive water, energy, and waste that you can use to fight climate change and COVID-19 on your campus. Come learn how to overcome design and operational challenges—both expected and unexpected—of high-performance buildings to create a healthier and safer campus environment.

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Report

Published
November 23, 2020

The Connected Campus

Building Long-Term Value and Agility by Connecting Offerings, Organizations and Operations

Campus environments play a vital role in student success. By making changes to their combination of spaces, institutions can respond to the shifts transforming higher education. Elliot Felix shares how colleges and universities can prepare for a more blended world by bringing together the digital and physical, enabling greater diversity and inclusion, and implementing flexible structures, staffing, space, and services. Sponsored Content: Knoll and brightspot strategy.
Abstract: Historic separations that defined higher education are dissolving: research is more interdisciplinary, online and on-campus learning are converging, wet and dry labs are blending, teaching and research overlap, and academia forges relationships with corporate partners. Institutions, by improving how they connect what they offer, how they are organized, and how they operate, can build value and agility to better assist their people on campus. Real-world examples in this white paper from Knoll and brightspot strategy discuss how campus spaces support student success, including how to fully use the campus; creating spaces that sustain diverse and flexible ways of working; thinking phygitally; and creating environments where today’s purpose-driven and entrepreneurial students (Gen Z) will thrive as they prepare to enter the workforce.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
October 6, 2019

2019 Southern Regional Conference | October 2019

Setting the Table for Strategy and Culture to Dine Together

This session will explore how Georgia Tech is using a technique called appreciative inquiry to build a positive, productive culture through the strategy development and implementation process.
Abstract: It has often been said that culture eats strategy for breakfast. While that can often be true, it does not have to be that way. Culture and strategy can be close companions and highly complementary when positioned as mutually reinforcing parts of the planning process. When strategy is developed with an appreciation for cultural strengths, it has a better chance to move beyond words on a screen or on paper. At the same time, organizational strategy can strengthen and reinforce an improved organizational culture.

Georgia Tech is using a technique called appreciative inquiry to build a positive, productive culture through the strategy development and implementation process. This approach reinforces the positive elements of the current culture while clearly defining the cultural attributes needed for success in the future.
This discussion will explore ways to draw out the best in organizational culture to create an effective strategy while also using strategy to steer culture in a positive direction.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
October 6, 2019

2019 Southern Regional Conference | October 2019

Space Portfolio Planning Partnership

This session will share a portfolio-based approach to space management as an institutional, governance-based framework for aligning space—its allocation and use—to meet priorities and program needs.
Abstract: This session will share a portfolio-based approach to space management as an institutional, governance-based framework for aligning space—its allocation and use—to meet priorities and program needs. You will learn how we aligned space governance with our institution's organizational hierarchy through defined portfolios, allowing central planning units to use a streamlined process and adaptive planning tools to arrive at an unbiased, data-driven perspective.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2018

Enhancing the Student Experience Through Placemaking

Georgia Tech’s West Village Dining Commons

Students thrive in authentic, multifunctional spaces that foster both individual reflection and social interaction and further the connection between place and the human experience.

From Volume 46 Number 4 | July–September 2018

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2018

Researching Lead Users to Predict the Future

Lead users represent the future that’s already here. Let them be your crystal ball the next time you face a forward-thinking planning project.

From Volume 46 Number 3 | April–June 2018

Abstract: Have we heard from enough people? Sometimes leaders ask this question to seek consensus or in the hope of making a tough call easy with more data. But this is the wrong question to ask. A better question is, “Have we talked to the right people?” In this article, we discuss how institutions can research their “lead users” whose extreme behaviors today will be the norm tomorrow. Using a case study rethinking Georgia Tech’s library services, spaces, and staffing, we explain who lead users are, how to identify them, how to research them to uncover insights, and how they can champion innovation on your campus.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 1, 2001

The Value of Comprehensive Capital Planning

An innovative approach to the capital planning process will determine the future physical character of an institution and the capability of facilities to support its programs.

From Volume 29 Number 4 | Summer 2001

Abstract: An innovative approach to the capital planning process will determine the future physical character of an institution and the capability of facilities to support its programs.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 1999

Benchmarking: A New Approach to Space Planning

An alternative approach uses space benchmarking and faculty head count for predicting space needs.

From Volume 27 Number 3 | Spring 1999

Abstract: Examines traditional assumptions underlying space management and proposes an alternative approach to projecting space use. Specifically, the author recommends making projections based on space per faculty rather than space per student, and then comparing these projections with the space allocation at peer institutions. Problems with traditional methods of space allocation are discussed, as is the process of implementing this approach and identifying comparable institutions.

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