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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Conference Recordings

Published
April 30, 2021

2021 Pacific Regional Conference | April–June 2021

Mindful Redesign for New and Effective Learning Environments

Join us to discuss what our campuses are planning for the immediate and distant future of teaching and learning.
Abstract: This session will focus on how changes in academic planning—accelerated in large part due to COVID-19—are resulting in new physical and virtual frameworks for learning. These range from enhanced online platforms to flexible hybrid environments, including the reappropriation and redesign of ‘found spaces,’ such as valuable and underutilized exterior zones on our existing campuses. Join us to discuss what our campuses are planning for the immediate and distant future of teaching and learning.

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Report

Published
November 23, 2020

The Connected Campus

Building Long-Term Value and Agility by Connecting Offerings, Organizations and Operations

Campus environments play a vital role in student success. By making changes to their combination of spaces, institutions can respond to the shifts transforming higher education. Elliot Felix shares how colleges and universities can prepare for a more blended world by bringing together the digital and physical, enabling greater diversity and inclusion, and implementing flexible structures, staffing, space, and services. Sponsored Content: Knoll and brightspot strategy.
Abstract: Historic separations that defined higher education are dissolving: research is more interdisciplinary, online and on-campus learning are converging, wet and dry labs are blending, teaching and research overlap, and academia forges relationships with corporate partners. Institutions, by improving how they connect what they offer, how they are organized, and how they operate, can build value and agility to better assist their people on campus. Real-world examples in this white paper from Knoll and brightspot strategy discuss how campus spaces support student success, including how to fully use the campus; creating spaces that sustain diverse and flexible ways of working; thinking phygitally; and creating environments where today’s purpose-driven and entrepreneurial students (Gen Z) will thrive as they prepare to enter the workforce.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 1, 2019

Relic or Relevant

Is Stanford University’s Main Quad Still a Place for Community Engagement?

The university’s founders specified that the space that would become the Main Quad, along with its buildings, should facilitate human discourse and connection. Has it reached across generations to remain an active place for student life?

From Volume 48 Number 1 | October–December 2019

Abstract: The quadrangle is a medieval-European legacy adapted by American universities during the nineteenth century. Given technological advances and changes in society, is the nineteenth-century icon changing? Will the American campus look different in the future? With a selected group of students, faculty, alumni, and staff, we discussed the relevance—past, present, and future—of Stanford University’s Main Quadrangle—as a venue for discourse and community engagement. Despite it being a relic, we concluded that the Main Quad continues to be the heart of the Stanford campus community.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

Issues in Workplace Design (and How Innovative Universities Address Them)

Abstract: On the average campus, office space accounts for more square footage than classrooms, instructional and research labs combined. Accordingly, its design and utilization can have significant campus impact. This panel discussion addresses the challenges that institutions face when rethinking their approach to workplace design. We will provide guidance on planning, programming, and design strategies to align workplaces with educational mission, respond to fiscal pressures, and compete for talent.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

Decarbonize Your Campus Through Building Electrification

Abstract: The path to carbon neutrality is clear: electrify everything and procure renewable energy. How to get to 100% electric power is less clear. Stanford University has been focused on this challenge, committing to all-electric buildings by June 2019. This session will give attendees a clear road map and strategies for converting the energy your buildings use from gas to electric—whether the energy heats the building, glass beakers, or dinner.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2019

Planning, Utopia, and Heritage in the Design of Campuses

The University of Virginia as a Paradigm

The fusion between utopia and planning has influenced both the interior of university enclosures and the outside.

From Volume 47 Number 3 | April–June 2019

Abstract: Human education is an experience that has a spatial dimension. To optimize the design/architectural component as a factor of excellence, historically, the coordination of two attitudes at universities has been a vital heritage: utopia and planning. Utopia is the energy used by universities to conceive and evolve their physical establishments. By the process of planning, campuses have undergone a long-term evolution of their built heritage, focusing on those where the hallmark is their human scale. This article illustrates briefly the application of these concepts in five cases, which have been culturally recognized as UNESCO World Heritage sites. However, it explores in depth one of those: The University of Virginia.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
March 27, 2019

2019 Pacific Regional Conference | March 2019

Stanford’s Main Quad

“Relic or Relevant” in Discourse, Pedagogy, and Community Today?

This presentation will address how a strong campus identity can create community engagement, facilitate discourse, and influence pedagogy through architecture that recalls the past, is relevant to the present, and can adapt to the future.
Abstract: Stanford University's historic Main Quadrangle reflects a unique design and mission as envisioned by the founders and communicated through its architecture. But does this model still contribute to student engagement and learning? We will discuss the pedagogical, civic discourse, and community function of the Stanford Quadrangle and Memorial Church, highlighting perspectives of students, faculty, staff and alumni. This presentation will address how a strong campus identity can create community engagement, facilitate discourse, and influence pedagogy through architecture that recalls the past, is relevant to the present, and can adapt to the future.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2004

Solving Campus Parking Shortages: New Solutions for an Old Problem

Recent major enrollment and construction trends on campus mean that, once again, the demand for parking is increasing at the same time as supply is being eroded. Universities and colleges, however, are able to achieve more integrated parking and transportation policies than are other large institutions.

From Volume 33 Number 1 | September–November 2004

Abstract: Universities and colleges across the country are faced with growth in the campus population and the loss of surface parking lots for new buildings. The response of many institutions is to build new garages with the assumption that parking demand ratios will remain the same. Such an approach, however, can be extremely expensive—upwards of $2,000 per net new space annually. In many cases, a mix of parking and demand reduction programs—such as shuttles, bicycle and pedestrian improvements, and financial incentives not to drive—can accommodate growth at a lower cost per trip. A balanced approach will also tend to support other goals, from improving town-gown relations to maintaining debt capacity. Demand management strategies have been employed by institutions for many years. However, it is less common for a cost-benefit analysis to be undertaken comparing them with new parking construction. Using examples from universities in California and Colorado, this article demonstrates a methodology to inform basic decisions on the amount of parking required to cater to campus growth, which can be incorporated into campus master planning.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2004

Endowment Spending—A Double-Edged Sword

Sharp changes in endowment market values highlight the importance of having an informed and balanced strategy regarding endowment spending. That has never been more evident than in the ups and downs experienced by institutions during the past 5–6 years.

From Volume 32 Number 3 | March–May 2004

Abstract: The growing ability of private colleges and universities to use a high level of annual endowment spending in support of current operations has been a source of financial strength during much of the past two decades. More recently, however, declining endowments at most colleges have raised concerns about declines in the availability of annual endowment spending. Decreases or stagnation in endowment spending would pose a particular challenge for colleges that have grown most reliant on such endowment support. This article describes these recent changes in endowment support for current operations, analyzes how the budgetary strains have arisen, and suggests ways that colleges may respond to the strains.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2003

The Road Less Traveled: Sustainable Transportation for Campuses

The high costs of parking expansion have propelled many institutions toward a transportation demand management strategy to shift many trips from single occupant automobiles to other modes of travel.

From Volume 31 Number 3 | March–May 2003

Abstract: This article provides a survey of innovative approaches to campus transportation in the United States. The high costs of parking expansion have propelled many institutions toward a transportation demand management strategy, using parking pricing, transit passes for students and employees, and investment in bicycle infrastructure to shift many trips from single-occupant automobiles to other modes of travel. These institutions have experienced multiple benefits, including lower transportation costs, lower environmental impacts, and improved community relations.

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