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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Conference Recordings

Published
October 26, 2021

Rejuvenation

Investing in Existing Residence Halls for Bright Futures

In this session, we'll provide you with practical strategies that you can apply at your institution as you explore the possibilities of renovating existing student housing facilities.
Abstract: Almost every institution has existing residence halls that they could upgrade for a fraction of the cost of building new. As institutions seek to meet student housing needs, they should consider renovating existing buildings as a viable strategy for creating state-of-the-art facilities. Taking this path can extend building life, attract students, and save capital. In this session, we'll provide you with practical strategies that you can apply at your institution as you explore the possibilities of renovating existing student housing facilities.

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$50

Partner Content

Published
April 1, 2021

Resilience in the Great Outdoors

Exploring the Future of Outdoor Learning Environments on Campus

Before the Fall 2020 semester, the Siebel Center for Design at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign partnered with architects and engineers to lead a virtual design charrette focused on extending the life of outdoor campus spaces as learning environments. They also reached out to schools around the country to learn about their recent experiences with these spaces.
Abstract: While adopted as a safer near-term solution, outdoor learning environments now seem likely to play a larger role in long-term planning. Schools will now use lessons learned during the pandemic to think more critically about outdoor campus space as an integral component of classroom education and to support student wellbeing. Before the Fall 2020 semester, the Siebel Center for Design at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign partnered with architects and engineers to lead a virtual design charrette focused on extending the life of outdoor campus spaces as learning environments. They also reached out to schools around the country to learn about their recent experiences with these spaces.

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Conference Recordings

Published
July 20, 2020

2020 Annual Conference | July 2020

Improve Implementation and Innovation With Project Management

We will share how University of Illinois has introduced project management tools and processes to help stakeholders implement plans and use resources more effectively.
Abstract: Often people leading the implementation of new initiatives or response plans have enthusiasm and dedication, but lack specific skills, tools, and methods necessary for success. We will share how University of Illinois has introduced project management tools and processes to help stakeholders implement plans and use resources more effectively. You'll learn how providing a defined path from idea to implementation ensures initiatives are evaluated and prioritized, resources are deployed effectively, and projects are supported correctly.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
October 28, 2019

2019 North Central Regional Conference | October 2019

The Campus Master Plan as a Catalyst for Institutional Change

We will share how the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign leveraged the planning process to spur institutional change in financial, procurement, and planning matters.
Abstract: In an effort to address ambitious campus sustainability goals, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) creatively balanced physical campus growth and renewal with a policy prohibiting new square footage. The results continue to exceed expectations. The master planning process can help the university achieve sustainability in the face of shrinking resources, all while developing a physical environment that fosters student learning and wellbeing. We will share our insights on leveraging the planning process to spur institutional change in financial, procurement, and planning matters.

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Free

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Free

eBook icon

Published
July 27, 2013

2013 SCUP–48 Annual Conference | July 2013

Disasters Happen

Get Ready, Stay Ready! Integrated Academic Continuity Planning

Go beyond theory and concepts to the actual integrated mechanics and step-by-step methodology for developing and maintaining operational-level continuity plans.
Abstract: Learn the things you need to do to get ready and stay ready! Numerous recent campus disruptions, outages, and disasters have highlighted the importance of investing in the proactive risk management solution known as academic continuity planning. Go beyond theory and concepts to the actual integrated mechanics and step-by-step methodology for developing and maintaining operational-level continuity plans. Cultivate integration with a service designed specifically to support the need for higher education institutions to be prepared. Is your campus ready?

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Free

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 1, 2005

The Power of Place in Learning

If everyone’s learning online, can it truly be said that they’re “going to college?” The language of place continues to be important and to reveal that a campus is an important place, even though in the future students may take classes online at home and then go to campus to study.

From Volume 33 Number 4 | June–August 2005

Abstract: The commonly-used expression “going to college” affirms that higher education is still rooted in place. Our institutions have three cultures in which learners physically immerse themselves: collegiate culture (a generational culture); academic culture (an intellectual culture); and campus culture (an institutional culture). Other agents—the armed forces and the work place, for instance—also acculturate young adults, but colleges and universities alone nurture academic culture. For this reason, the design of campus places as learning spaces becomes a critical issue. We must be endlessly inventive in creating and celebrating the cultures of place in academic life.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2004

Solving Campus Parking Shortages: New Solutions for an Old Problem

Recent major enrollment and construction trends on campus mean that, once again, the demand for parking is increasing at the same time as supply is being eroded. Universities and colleges, however, are able to achieve more integrated parking and transportation policies than are other large institutions.

From Volume 33 Number 1 | September–November 2004

Abstract: Universities and colleges across the country are faced with growth in the campus population and the loss of surface parking lots for new buildings. The response of many institutions is to build new garages with the assumption that parking demand ratios will remain the same. Such an approach, however, can be extremely expensive—upwards of $2,000 per net new space annually. In many cases, a mix of parking and demand reduction programs—such as shuttles, bicycle and pedestrian improvements, and financial incentives not to drive—can accommodate growth at a lower cost per trip. A balanced approach will also tend to support other goals, from improving town-gown relations to maintaining debt capacity. Demand management strategies have been employed by institutions for many years. However, it is less common for a cost-benefit analysis to be undertaken comparing them with new parking construction. Using examples from universities in California and Colorado, this article demonstrates a methodology to inform basic decisions on the amount of parking required to cater to campus growth, which can be incorporated into campus master planning.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2004

Research Space: Who Needs It, Who Gets It, Who Pays for It?

An overview of research space management in the United States, based on interviews with senior administrators, Internet documents, and the authors’ vast experience, identifies important trends that need attention.

From Volume 33 Number 1 | September–November 2004

Abstract: Today, the amount of space devoted to research at research universities exceeds that of classrooms and class laboratories. This research space portfolio presents important policy and management challenges. As stewards of this portfolio, universities must address issues of funding the construction of research facilities, equipping and maintaining them, allocating and accounting for space used for research, and managing, in broadest terms, the physical and administrative infrastructure in which research is conducted. As this article illustrates, managing the balance between the growing demand for and the supply of research space is complicated. To address the issues of research space, universities have developed a variety of space management methods to fit their unique research missions, priorities, and operational culture. This article provides important insights into this little studied aspect of higher education space planning. The article is an overview of research space management across the U. S. on general campuses and in health science centers. It is based on interviews with senior administrators in selected research universities conducted specifically for this study, information about research space management available on university documents on the Internet, and on the work of Ira Fink and Associates, Inc. in programming research facilities on a multitude of campuses nationwide.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 1999

Benchmarking: A New Approach to Space Planning

An alternative approach uses space benchmarking and faculty head count for predicting space needs.

From Volume 27 Number 3 | Spring 1999

Abstract: Examines traditional assumptions underlying space management and proposes an alternative approach to projecting space use. Specifically, the author recommends making projections based on space per faculty rather than space per student, and then comparing these projections with the space allocation at peer institutions. Problems with traditional methods of space allocation are discussed, as is the process of implementing this approach and identifying comparable institutions.

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