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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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  • Organization: Carnegie Mellon Universityx

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Conference Recordings

Published
March 9, 2021

2021 Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2021

Adapting Campus Spaces for Generation Z at Carnegie Mellon University

In this session we'll share two recent CMU projects addressing Gen Z's preference for experiential learning, their digital proficiency, and their entrepreneurial spirit—and you can learn now to apply these methods to learning spaces on your campus.
Abstract: Generation Z is now on campus and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) has been preparing. Different from Millennials, Gen Z are digital natives who need campus spaces that engage with this expertise and their preference for hands-on learning. In this session we'll share two recent CMU projects addressing Gen Z's preference for experiential learning, their digital proficiency, and their entrepreneurial spirit. Join us to find out how CMU uses space to engage Gen Z and apply these methods to learning spaces on your campus.

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$50

Webinar Recordings

Published
September 16, 2020

Coffee Chat: All Good Plans Change

Amanda Markovic from GBBN Architects and Jennifer McDowell from Carnegie Mellon University moderated this coffee chat on how institutions can adjust to keep those on campus feeling safe, supported, and healthy.
Abstract: Nobody knows when campus will return to full capacity, but in the short term, there are things that can be done to bring students, faculty and staff back smartly and appropriately. Campus life will look different, but what’s wrong with different? We want our students to feel safe, supported, stay healthy while maintaining a different on-campus experience for every student.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

From “What if?” to What’s Next?”

Planning for a Next Generation Business School

In this session, we will explore how to plan a campus ecosystem that connects business with people, ideas, and resources to drive a new research and education model.
Abstract: Societal challenges and opportunities no longer fit in departments. Future success requires business researchers, educators, and students to interconnect across the entire campus and beyond. In this session, we will explore how to plan a campus ecosystem that connects business with people, ideas, and resources to drive a new research and education model. You will learn key strategies and find opportunities—encompassing planning, programming, design process, and lessons learned from building use—to advance your institution's mission and build a framework to implement your initiatives.

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Free

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Free

Conference Presentations

Delivered
March 27, 2019

2019 Pacific Regional Conference | March 2019

Connection Hubs

Creating Community in the Digital Age

We will look at examples of connection hubs and discuss how they are designed, their benefits, and how their impact is measured.
Abstract: Connection hubs re-vision the traditional campus commons so it encourages community, personal interaction, and wellness. These flexible and transformable spaces allow students, faculty, and staff to gather, collaborate, and emotionally bond with the environment. We will look at examples of connection hubs and discuss how they are designed, their benefits, and how their impact is measured.

Member Price:
Free

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Free

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2004

Research Space: Who Needs It, Who Gets It, Who Pays for It?

An overview of research space management in the United States, based on interviews with senior administrators, Internet documents, and the authors’ vast experience, identifies important trends that need attention.

From Volume 33 Number 1 | September–November 2004

Abstract: Today, the amount of space devoted to research at research universities exceeds that of classrooms and class laboratories. This research space portfolio presents important policy and management challenges. As stewards of this portfolio, universities must address issues of funding the construction of research facilities, equipping and maintaining them, allocating and accounting for space used for research, and managing, in broadest terms, the physical and administrative infrastructure in which research is conducted. As this article illustrates, managing the balance between the growing demand for and the supply of research space is complicated. To address the issues of research space, universities have developed a variety of space management methods to fit their unique research missions, priorities, and operational culture. This article provides important insights into this little studied aspect of higher education space planning. The article is an overview of research space management across the U. S. on general campuses and in health science centers. It is based on interviews with senior administrators in selected research universities conducted specifically for this study, information about research space management available on university documents on the Internet, and on the work of Ira Fink and Associates, Inc. in programming research facilities on a multitude of campuses nationwide.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2003

Cornell’s Commitment to Housing for Freshmen

Cornell's blending of a physical master plan and a social master plan brought about the decision that a modern, cohesive freshmen housing complex would be located on its North Campus.

From Volume 32 Number 1 | September–November 2003

Abstract: This article explains the various steps taken by Cornell University to create a Freshmen Campus on their North Campus. It first explores the reasoning about the decision to create a Freshmen Campus and then explains the process whereby the plan was developed. It compares the developed new physical plan to other campuses as well. Within the article are planning guidelines for designing new freshmen residence halls and dining facilities.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2003

The Critical Role of Higher Education in Creating a Sustainable Future

Higher education can serve as a model of sustainability by fully integrating all aspects of campus life.

From Volume 31 Number 3 | March–May 2003

Abstract: The path to a healthy, just, and sustainable future for all current and future generations of humans and other biological species will require a transformative change in thinking values and action by all individuals and institutions in the next two decades. The institutions within higher education bear a moral responsibility to increase the awareness, knowledge, skills, and values needed to change the collective mind-set. Because it prepares most of society’s professionals and leaders, higher education plays a critical but often-overlooked role in making this vision a reality. This article explores how higher education would model sustainability as a fully integrated community intricately connecting learning, research, operations, purchasing investments, and work with local and regional communities. The envisioned framework for higher education will result in the interdisciplinary, systemic learning and practice needed to provide the educational experience for graduates to lead society on a sustainable path. It provides several examples of colleges and universities that have made some of these changes with an emphasis on curriculum connected to other college and university functions. It also suggests a new role for college and university planners in this transformation and provides other sources of information on the changes that are happening in higher education.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 1999

Benchmarking: A New Approach to Space Planning

An alternative approach uses space benchmarking and faculty head count for predicting space needs.

From Volume 27 Number 3 | Spring 1999

Abstract: Examines traditional assumptions underlying space management and proposes an alternative approach to projecting space use. Specifically, the author recommends making projections based on space per faculty rather than space per student, and then comparing these projections with the space allocation at peer institutions. Problems with traditional methods of space allocation are discussed, as is the process of implementing this approach and identifying comparable institutions.

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