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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
October 4, 2021

Rejuvenation

Investing in Existing Residence Halls for Bright Futures

In this session, we'll provide you with practical strategies that you can apply at your institution as you explore the possibilities of renovating existing student housing facilities.
Abstract: Almost every institution has existing residence halls that they could upgrade for a fraction of the cost of building new. As institutions seek to meet student housing needs, they should consider renovating existing buildings as a viable strategy for creating state-of-the-art facilities. Taking this path can extend building life, attract students, and save capital. In this session, we'll provide you with practical strategies that you can apply at your institution as you explore the possibilities of renovating existing student housing facilities.

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Non-Member Price:
$50

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
January 1, 2018

An Exploration of Administrative Bloat in American Higher Education

Administrative bloat, the ballooning growth of administrative functions and personnel in U.S. higher education, is the unintended consequence of several factors and can be mitigated to some extent through deliberate strategies.

From Volume 46 Number 2 | January–March 2018

Abstract: This article evaluates administrative bloat, the ballooning growth of administrative functions and personnel, in American higher education. This evaluation was undertaken through a review of the available literature describing administrative bloat. Though unintentional, increased spending and government requirements for accountability may have contributed to overall growth and cost in higher education. Similarly, the changing composition of faculty—in terms of tenure-track faculty, annual contracts, and adjunct faculty—may have also played a role in the increased influence that administration has over campus policy and curricular decisions. Strategies to mitigate the cost of administrative bloat and to balance campus decisions between faculty and administration are suggested.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2014

Enhancing Campus Sustainability Through SITES and Socially Equitable Design

The Socially Equitable category represents a unique and often missed opportunity for academic institutions to further their commitment to sustainable practices.

From Volume 42 Number 4 | July–September 2014

Abstract: Sustainability guidelines for campuses typically focus on the environmental, structural, and organizational aspects of colleges and universities. The Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES) expands the definition of campus sustainability by including “Socially Equitable” design guidelines that consider how people interact with and within campus landscapes. Landscapes that afford (1) mental restoration and (2) social interaction become sustainable under the SITES definition. This study conducted at Agnes Scott College and The University of Georgia tests the criteria associated with these guidelines to determine their relevance and impact. Through mapping exercises, direct observation, and a questionnaire survey, data were collected from 120 students to determine which “sustainable” criteria are relevant to campus landscapes. The findings confirm the criteria listed in the SITES guidelines and introduce additional criteria to consider for enhancing Socially Equitable design standards on campus.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 1998

Dealing With the Press

From Volume 26 Number 3 | Spring 1998

Abstract: Book review of Truth and Consequences: Colleges and Universitites Meet Public Crises, by Jerrold Footlick. ACE/Oryx Press, 1997. 192 pages. ISBN 0-89774-970-7. Pull quotes: "The press is not likely to change how it operates, so universities need to learn how to deal with the media more skillfully."

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