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Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
October 26, 2021

Transform Your Building Through Inclusive, Intentional Design

We'll take you through our process of transforming an iconic campus building that relates to today's students through environmental messaging while also celebrating the institution, its community, and its history.
Abstract: We have a responsibility to make our campus buildings as welcoming and inclusive as possible. This session will share how Purdue University transformed its campus from a transactional place to an inviting, welcoming, and inclusive one. Intentionality plays an important role in a building's redesign; planners must focus on both the building's original intent and how to use its assets to fulfill modern needs. We'll take you through our process of transforming an iconic campus building that relates to today's students through environmental messaging while also celebrating the institution, its community, and its history.

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Non-Member Price:
$50

Conference Recordings

Published
October 20, 2020

2020 North Central Regional Conference | October 2020

Keynote: Amidst Converging Storms | Part Two

Planning and Strategy for Long-term Recovery and Resiliency

In the second of two keynotes focusing on higher education’s “perfect storm”—the confluence of a global pandemic, financial crisis, shifting demographics, and a changing culture—a cross-disciplinary panel will discuss their integrated planning strategies for moving from a state of triage to transformation.
Abstract: In the second of two keynotes focusing on higher education’s “perfect storm”—the confluence of a global pandemic, financial crisis, shifting demographics, and a changing culture—a cross-disciplinary panel will discuss their integrated planning strategies for moving from a state of triage to transformation. Integrated planning is the foundation upon which we confront higher education’s current turbulent landscape and make the changes necessary for bringing about the “new normal.” Come learn new planning methods and tools for creating future scenario models, achieving operational flexibility and long-term resiliency, and communicating the value of integrated planning at your institution.

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Conference Recordings

Published
October 19, 2020

2020 North Central Regional Conference | October 2020

The Planning Continuum

How Campus Plans Inform Purposeful Decision Making

We’ll discuss how Purdue University’s culture of continuous planning leverages data, facility information, and design to engage new stakeholders, implement a campus-wide vision, and fast-track decision making.
Abstract: Academic life is closely tied to space and conversations about space reveal much about our priorities and personalities. Having a plan can help facilitate these conversations around a shared vision. We’ll discuss how Purdue University’s culture of continuous planning leverages data, facility information, and design to engage new stakeholders, implement a campus-wide vision, and fast-track decision making. The world of planning is changing, so come learn how creating the right scope to achieve the desired outcomes and inform decision making is critical for establishing a planning continuum on your campus.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
October 6, 2019

2019 Southern Regional Conference | October 2019

From Stymied to STEM Lab

Purdue University’s Master Plan Success

We will share lessons learned from Purdue University's college master plan and STEM building that you can use to clarify thinking, focus need, build a case for a new project, and set the stage for future growth.
Abstract: With crowded research facilities, limited resources, and a strong need for innovative interdisciplinary teaching space, many institutions feel stuck. Purdue University College of Science's went from stymied to STEM lab in just four years through data-focused master planning and an accelerated design process. We will share lessons learned from Purdue University's college master plan and STEM building that you can use to clarify thinking, focus need, build a case for a new project, and set the stage for future growth.

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Free

Non-Member Price:
Free

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 1, 2004

Faculty Mentoring: What the Boyer Commission Forgot

A proposed mentoring program using “strategic collaboration” to improve learning by motivating and enabling faculty to become better undergraduate teachers is suggested in support of the Boyer Commission’s goals.

From Volume 33 Number 2 | December–February 2004

Abstract: In 1998, a Carnegie Foundation Commission Report criticized America’s 123 research universities for failing our educational system by ignoring undergraduate education. Notably absent from the Commission's list of recommendations was mentoring research university faculty as a strategy to improve their teaching. This article discusses strategic collaboration, a mentoring model that can contribute significantly to achieving this objective. Such a network can also create an environment conducive to interdisciplinary research that, because of its increased value and rewards at such universities, can provide an added incentive for faculty participation.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 1999

Benchmarking: A New Approach to Space Planning

An alternative approach uses space benchmarking and faculty head count for predicting space needs.

From Volume 27 Number 3 | Spring 1999

Abstract: Examines traditional assumptions underlying space management and proposes an alternative approach to projecting space use. Specifically, the author recommends making projections based on space per faculty rather than space per student, and then comparing these projections with the space allocation at peer institutions. Problems with traditional methods of space allocation are discussed, as is the process of implementing this approach and identifying comparable institutions.

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