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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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  • Organization: The University of Texas at Austinx

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
October 5, 2021

Rethinking Academic Workspaces

Learn from three university panelists how to accurately assess needs, identify opportunities for improvement, and implement post-pandemic solutions for hybrid work environments on your campus.
Abstract: Physical and technological re-investments in space must produce a measurable return. Reimagining campus office and instruction space can better align capital planning with student, faculty, and staff success. As space management policies and planning shift their focus from how to where people work and learn, three university panelists will share how they're rethinking academic space to improve utilization, access, and performance. Come learn how to accurately assess needs, identify opportunities for improvement, and implement post-pandemic solutions for hybrid work environments on your campus.

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Conference Recordings

Published
October 5, 2021

Rethinking Research and Real Estate at UT Austin

The J.J. Pickle Research Campus Plan marks an operational shift for the University of Texas (UT) at Austin, exploring mixed-use development and an integrated research environment to leverage a real estate asset and advance the university's mission.
Abstract: Research campuses are an increasingly important and integral part of innovative research development in higher education. By generating the right type of campus environment, institutions can foster successful partnerships with private entities. The J.J. Pickle Research Campus Plan marks an operational shift for the University of Texas (UT) at Austin, exploring mixed-use development and an integrated research environment to leverage a real estate asset and advance the university's mission. Come learn from multiple case studies, including UT Austin, and discuss the impact of environment, research focus, and governance structure on both the academic and financial success of a research campus.

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Conference Recordings

Published
October 5, 2020

2020 Southern Regional Conference | October 2020

Data-Informed Design Decisions

Budgeting Space and Dollars

Come learn how data-informed design can inform your next building project, guide space allocation, and minimize the need for new construction on your campus.
Abstract: Institutions constantly struggle with space, but having the right data can drive meaningful discussions about (re)allocating space and ultimately save a campus money. Beginning with the right quantitative and qualitative data and then layering on architectural analysis and operational considerations can help you produce the best solutions for your space-related challenges. Come learn how data-informed design can inform your next building project, guide space allocation, and minimize the need for new construction on your campus.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

Assessing and Relocating Administrative Workspaces, On and Off Campus

Abstract: On many campuses, administrative office space has expanded, taking over the center of campus and other areas that would be better served with instructional space. This session will detail The University of Texas at Austin's process for recapturing that space for student or academic use by identifying ideal locations for administrative units. We'll discuss the space utilization study we undertook, how we decided where administrative units should be relocated, and the migration plan to achieve relocations.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 2006

Privatizing Public Higher Education: Beliefs that Fuel the Conversation

Why do some people think privatization would be better and others think of it as anathema? This article addresses what lies behind nine related “beliefs” held by higher education leaders and policy makers.

From Volume 34 Number 3 | April–June 2006

Abstract: What fuels the push toward privatization of public higher education institutions? This article attempts to unravel the nine beliefs that underlie conversations taking place in state legislatures and on higher education campuses and then asks, Will privatization work? How will it work for the state's citizens, the states, and institutions? The answer is mixed and depends upon how certain questions are answered and how much faith one places in the higher education market.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 1, 2002

Toward a Meaningful Institutional Effectiveness Plan

Learning from accreditation.

From Volume 30 Number 4 | Summer 2002

Abstract: The authors explore institutional effectiveness and offer suggestions for developing meaningful institutional effectiveness plans for institutions of higher education. Their discussion is based on their review of institutional effectiveness plans from nearly 30 institutions of higher education as well as SACS publications. The article includes an exploration of the topic of institutional effectiveness, suggestions for developing meaningful institutional effectiveness plans, and potential problems that were identified through the experiences of other institutions. An extensive list of suggested readings, which includes many online references, follows the article.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 1999

Benchmarking: A New Approach to Space Planning

An alternative approach uses space benchmarking and faculty head count for predicting space needs.

From Volume 27 Number 3 | Spring 1999

Abstract: Examines traditional assumptions underlying space management and proposes an alternative approach to projecting space use. Specifically, the author recommends making projections based on space per faculty rather than space per student, and then comparing these projections with the space allocation at peer institutions. Problems with traditional methods of space allocation are discussed, as is the process of implementing this approach and identifying comparable institutions.

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