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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Conference Recordings

Published
July 12, 2021

The Role of Community Colleges in Future-proofing Education

In this session, we’ll share how community colleges can use metrics to understand long-term projections around regional enrollment needs and use human purpose integrated design to build for the future.
Abstract: With the cost of education skyrocketing, institutions must address the demographic cliff for future generations of learners. Community colleges offer important lessons regarding educational offerings across a diverse background and recognize how workforce development can inform campus planning and design. In this session, we'll share how community colleges can use metrics to understand long-term projections around regional enrollment needs and use human purpose integrated design to build for the future.

Member Price:
$35 | Login

Non-Member Price:
$50

Conference Recordings

Published
March 8, 2021

2021 Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2021

The Kitchens

How a Culinary Arts Program Supports Community Revitalization

In this session, you'll learn how RCC delivers culinary workforce training and academic programs in a satellite facility at the heart of a poverty-concentrated area, pushing back economic isolation and promoting learning and health.
Abstract: The Kitchens at Reynolds Community College (RCC) exemplify a developing national model, featuring public and private organizations in a successful collective effort to boost economic development and healthier outcomes in a historically under-resourced community. Integrated planning for The Kitchens involves community partnerships and collaboration in education, health and wellness, workforce training, and economic revitalization. In this session, you'll learn how RCC delivers culinary workforce training and academic programs in a satellite facility at the heart of a poverty-concentrated area, pushing back economic isolation and promoting learning and health.

Member Price:
$35 | Login

Non-Member Price:
$50

Conference Presentations

Delivered
October 6, 2019

2019 Southern Regional Conference | October 2019

Educating the Next Generation of Industry Leaders

This session will illustrate how industry-academic partnerships have led to the creation of cutting-edge, career-focused education that reimagines vocational training through a new, didactic construction sciences facility.
Abstract: This session will illustrate how industry-academic partnerships have led to the creation of cutting-edge, career-focused education that reimagines vocational training through a new, didactic construction sciences facility. With a skilled labor shortage in the construction industry, this program hopes to close that gap while creating an attractive, career-focused educational alternative to the traditional four-year college education. Beginning in middle and high schools and continuing through the workplace, developing new partnerships along the education continuum helps to reimagine workforce education and facilities to inspire the next generation of construction industry leaders.

Member Price:
Free

Non-Member Price:
Free

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2019

Middle Skills Education

Planners Are Reimagining Ways to Meld Instruction and Industry

Many jobs of the future will require more than a high school diploma but less than a four-year degree. How should we prepare the next generation of employees?

From Volume 47 Number 4 | July–September 2019

Abstract: Middle skills education, personalized curriculum, and student-directed training are playing an increasingly integral role in higher education. A new generation of students is already likely to hold different educational expectations and desires than their predecessors. Accommodating those trends means planners, architects, and higher education administrators will need to think differently about how they train skilled workers for the most needed professions.

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