SCUP
 

Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

FOUND 8 RESOURCES

REFINED BY:

  • Tags: Selecting Metricsx

Clear All
ABSTRACT:  | 
SORT BY:  | 

Delivered
July 16, 2021

Developing Shared Metrics to Guide Multi-level Institutional Planning

This session will focus on the development and use of consistent metrics through the program review process and other key university processes to support integrated planning at the department, school, and university levels.
Abstract: This session will focus on the development and use of consistent metrics through the program review process and other key university processes to support integrated planning at the department, school, and university levels. Using coordinated data at multiple levels of an institution can better inform both strategic planning and budget decisions. We'll share successful examples from Northwestern University that you can apply at your institution, including school-level dashboards that inform the annual strategic planning process as well as department-level planning.

Member Price:
$35 | Login

Non-Member Price:
$50

Delivered
July 13, 2021

A New Plan for Building Green

This session will focus on the next step in the evolution of green building and provide a comprehensive sustainability framework for responsible development with a holistic view of the campus and community wellbeing.
Abstract: LEED is not always suited to campus-wide, long-term perspectives on building development and carbon emissions reductions. It can often result in a more expensive process that misses the mark on achieving realized savings, leading universities to shift away from LEED. This session will focus on the next step in the evolution of green building and provide a comprehensive sustainability framework for responsible development with a holistic view of the campus and community wellbeing. Come learn how you can use this improved planning process for green building by outlining rigorous sustainable design standards and integrating operational tracking to examine facility performance.

Member Price:
$35 | Login

Non-Member Price:
$50

Published
April 20, 2021

A Different Kind of SMART

Using Performance-Oriented Metrics to Redefine Success in a Forward-Focused Research Lab

In this presentation, we discuss how to identify and select appropriate metrics—equally focused on education and research—for evaluating “SMART” research laboratories.
Abstract: “SMART” built environments usually refer to buildings with embedded technologies that allow them to run as efficiently as possible. Yet for research institutions, that definition should be expanded beyond efficiency to include metrics that are used to quantify research productivity and accomplishments. The expected useful life of the building and individual labs, research dollars generated per square foot, intellectual property generated, and successful recruitment and retainment of researchers are but a few bottom line-oriented measures that colleges and universities use. By embracing the business side of higher education, architects can create even smarter built environments.

In this presentation, we discuss how to identify and select appropriate metrics for institutions that are equally focused on education and research. What objective and subjective measures can be considered? Are these metrics applicable in our new (hopefully) post-COVID reality? How are institutions reallocating space in this new reality? How do we redefine the future of “smart” higher education research facilities?

Member Price:
$39 | Login

Non-Member Price:
$69

Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

Student Success

What's Space Got To Do With It?

We'll focus on tools and solutions that your institution can incorporate into its facilities planning process to ensure your learning spaces contribute to student success.
Abstract: There is increased demand to provide facilities that encourage student success. But how do you know if a space "works"? We will focus on how you can link your facilities planning to measurable student success. After reviewing broader national trends, we'll discuss metrics for student success and how space contributes to student success. Finally, we'll focus on tools and solutions that your institution can incorporate into its facilities planning process to ensure your learning spaces contribute to student success.

Member Price:
Free

Non-Member Price:
Free

Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

Higher Ed’s Missing Link

Turning Your Big Data Into Institutional Change

We'll share our metrics-based planning framework—that's producing remarkable outcomes—and explain how you can apply this concept at your institution.
Abstract: Literature points out that big data and analytics (BDA) still fails to positively influence institutional planning—even though it's promoted as a novel approach to improving efficiency and effectiveness. What limits the usefulness of BDA? Researchers point to a lack of conceptual models that translate information into meaningful signals. Nonsense! We're using a metrics-based planning framework that's producing remarkable outcomes. We'll share our framework and how you can apply this concept at your institution.

Member Price:
Free

Non-Member Price:
Free

Published
July 1, 2019

KPIs Drive Strategic Planning and Execution

And Feedback Steers the Institution in the Right Direction

Quantitative tools are essential for developing a framework, but properly identifying stakeholders and keeping them involved is what connects planning to execution.

From Volume 47 Number 4 | July–September 2019

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Published
July 1, 2017

Balanced Scorecard Implementation in a School of Nursing

A Case Study Analysis

Implementing the balanced scorecard measurably improved the overall effectiveness of planning activities and increased individual involvement in and understanding of the strategic planning process.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: This article describes execution of the balanced scorecard (BSC) strategic framework in a School of Nursing (SoN). The SoN strategy map was the outcome of the development phase. The two-year implementation phase incorporated balanced scorecards that linked outcome measures to the priority strategies. Thirty-two percent of the defined outcome measures were met. Factors in adopting the BSC framework included development of a strategic plan that supports the college mission and vision, improved communication within the SoN, a united effort to institute strategies to sustain the SoN’s future, and establishment of performance indicators to measure success in achieving those strategies.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access

Published
April 1, 2017

Integrating Board, System, and University Planning and Performance During a Period of Rapidly Declining State Funding Commitment

Even in the most difficult financial times, integrating planning and budgeting throughout the organization creates opportunities for success.

From Volume 45 Number 3 | April–June 2017

Abstract: In 2009 the Arizona University System (supporting over 130,000 enrollments) through its Board of Regents directed its board president and the presidents of Arizona State University, University of Arizona, and Northern Arizona University to create an operational plan that reflected the board’s vision, goals, and strategic directions. A primary objective was to transform the system (or enterprise) vision into concrete goals and outcomes that would directly connect to financial decision making at the system and university level. The backdrop for higher education planning and budgeting expectations included the continuation of severe reductions in state funding, rapidly increasing student tuition and fees, and a call for greater accountability. The planning processes were characterized by the integration of board and presidential discussions, inclusion of constituent debate, identification of strategic choices, and approval of outcomes focused on measuring performance. The integration ran across and within three organizations or levels that included the Arizona Board of Regents, its system administration, and the three universities.

Member Price:
Free | Login

Member-only Resource

Join now to have access