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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Delivered
June 4, 2021

2021 Pacific Regional Conference | April–June 2021

Insights

A Capstone to the 2021 Pacific Regional Spring Series

This capstone session will identify key insights from the series, pose new questions, and offer creative, actionable ideas for moving higher education forward.

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Delivered
May 14, 2021

2021 Pacific Regional Conference | April–June 2021

Student Success

Define It, Support it

In this session, we'll share how institutions have made changes in their metrics, planning and design strategies, and campus facilities that contribute to recruitment, academic growth, and graduation rates.
Abstract: The pandemic has exposed and added to the vulnerabilities that students face. It has also impacted how institutions serving underrepresented students are working to redefine student support in an evolving campus environment. In this session, we'll share how institutions have made changes in their metrics, planning and design strategies, and campus facilities that contribute to recruitment, academic growth, and graduation rates. Join us for an interactive discussion about student success strategies and learn new approaches for meeting returning students' needs, including hybrid learning, flexible learning spaces, and the importance of representation, inclusivity, safety, and wellness.

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Nonmember Price: $119

Delivered
April 30, 2021

2021 Pacific Regional Conference | April–June 2021

Mindful Redesign for New and Effective Learning Environments

Join us to discuss what our campuses are planning for the immediate and distant future of teaching and learning.
Abstract: This session will focus on how changes in academic planning—accelerated in large part due to COVID-19—are resulting in new physical and virtual frameworks for learning. These range from enhanced online platforms to flexible hybrid environments, including the reappropriation and redesign of ‘found spaces,’ such as valuable and underutilized exterior zones on our existing campuses. Join us to discuss what our campuses are planning for the immediate and distant future of teaching and learning.

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Nonmember Price: $119

Published
April 1, 2021

Resilience in the Great Outdoors

Exploring the Future of Outdoor Learning Environments on Campus

Before the Fall 2020 semester, the Siebel Center for Design at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign partnered with architects and engineers to lead a virtual design charrette focused on extending the life of outdoor campus spaces as learning environments. They also reached out to schools around the country to learn about their recent experiences with these spaces.
Abstract: While adopted as a safer near-term solution, outdoor learning environments now seem likely to play a larger role in long-term planning. Schools will now use lessons learned during the pandemic to think more critically about outdoor campus space as an integral component of classroom education and to support student wellbeing. Before the Fall 2020 semester, the Siebel Center for Design at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign partnered with architects and engineers to lead a virtual design charrette focused on extending the life of outdoor campus spaces as learning environments. They also reached out to schools around the country to learn about their recent experiences with these spaces.

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Published
October 31, 2020

The Connected Campus

Building Long-Term Value and Agility by Connecting Offerings, Organizations and Operations

Campus environments play a vital role in student success. By making changes to their combination of spaces, institutions can respond to the shifts transforming higher education. Elliot Felix shares how colleges and universities can prepare for a more blended world by bringing together the digital and physical, enabling greater diversity and inclusion, and implementing flexible structures, staffing, space, and services. Sponsored Content: Knoll and brightspot strategy.
Abstract: Historic separations that defined higher education are dissolving: research is more interdisciplinary, online and on-campus learning are converging, wet and dry labs are blending, teaching and research overlap, and academia forges relationships with corporate partners. Institutions, by improving how they connect what they offer, how they are organized, and how they operate, can build value and agility to better assist their people on campus. Real-world examples in this white paper from Knoll and brightspot strategy discuss how campus spaces support student success, including how to fully use the campus; creating spaces that sustain diverse and flexible ways of working; thinking phygitally; and creating environments where today’s purpose-driven and entrepreneurial students (Gen Z) will thrive as they prepare to enter the workforce.

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Published
August 13, 2020

De-Densifying Classrooms in the COVID-19 Era

A Scalable and Accurate Non-Linear Model Projects New Distanced Space Capacities

Columbia College Chicago’s “logistic growth model,” a mathematical model that is adaptable to highly variable campus spaces, gives priority to human-centered solutions while also promoting physical and emotional well-being. It can flexibly accommodate instructors, teaching assistants, and students for different pedagogical uses and within different types of facilities.

From Volume 48 Number 4 | July–September 2020

Abstract: Campus space planning generally involves the use of linear models that apply a simple square-foot-per-person calculation to determine capacities for different room sizes. Most return-to-campus strategies following the easing of COVID-19 shelter-in-place restrictions involve modification of these models, increasing square-footage-per-person to accommodate six feet of distancing. This provides reasonable upper and lower capacity estimates, but it does not yield accurate estimates across different room sizes and room types. Columbia College Chicago has developed a non-linear model that is both scalable and accurate, resulting in estimates that match test fits across all observed spaces.

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Delivered
October 28, 2019

2019 North Central Regional Conference | October 2019

Revitalization

Planning Adaptable Spaces for a Growing Campus Community

We will share how the renovation of The Ohio State University’s Biomedical and Materials Science Engineering Complex’s managed project objectives to achieve the best use of space, phased construction, budget, and sustainability goals.
Abstract: The Ohio State University (OSU) strategically planned and designed research and academic spaces for their growing College of Engineering program. This phased renovation and addition to existing laboratories within a prominent campus core provided OSU with a contextual gateway as well as essential research and academic space to support growing enrollment. We will share how the Biomedical and Materials Science Engineering Complex’s (BMEC) renovation required diligent management of project objectives to achieve the best use of space, phased construction, budget, and sustainability goals for a signature project.

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University-Industry Collaborations Are Driving Creation of Next-Generation Learning Space

New spaces, ranging from fabrication and prototyping studios to innovation districts, reflect a growing entrepreneurship and maker culture and give students the tools they need to succeed in a rapidly evolving marketplace.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: Industry and academia are partnering like never before as entrepreneurship and maker culture become more important to our economy and a regular fixture in higher education curricula. With the influx of allied industry partnerships, evolving pedagogies, entrepreneurship programs, and a maker culture comes a pressing need for new spaces, ranging from fabrication and prototyping studios to innovation districts devoted to new kinds of research partnerships. Schools like the University of Washington, Babson College, and Arizona State University are leading the way on new collaborations. In this article, Sasaki planners and urban designers examine how design disruption will guide the development of campuses that enable 21st-century teaching, learning, and research paradigms.

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The Challenge of Making Buildings Flexible

How to Create Campuses That Adapt to Changing Needs

How can buildings be both flexible and concrete? The answer is critical as institutions try to keep up with rapid changes in technology, curriculum, teaching techniques, and demographics.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: How can buildings be both flexible and concrete? It’s a contradiction in terms and a huge challenge facing university planners and facility managers as they try to keep up with rapid changes in technology, curriculum, teaching techniques, and student demographics. This article explores some of these trends in education and how construction techniques are evolving to meet the need for reconfigurable spaces.

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Teaching, Learning, Doing in Collaborative Spaces

The intermingling of undergraduate students with grad students, post-docs, faculty, and commercial interests in one innovative facility results in better academic experiences.

From Volume 45 Number 4 | July–September 2017

Abstract: Makerspaces designed for collaborative learning are appearing on campuses throughout the United States, including at Drexel University. These spaces succeed because they permit students to collaborate, observe, and learn from professors and peers. Unique to the Drexel project is the intermingling of engineering undergraduates, graduate students, post-docs, faculty, and commercial interests in one facility with laboratories, machine-shop equipment, and informal study areas. Facilities that give students great visibility into nearby research, contain areas where they can take breaks without leaving the building, and lend themselves to informal encounters with peers, faculty, and others result in better academic experiences for undergraduates.

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