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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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TaP Into SCUP

Published
June 9, 2022

Catapulting African-American Women to Degree Completion at Land-Grant HBCUs

What factors support degree completion for African-American women students at Land-Grant Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU)? New research on African-American women's degree completion dives into the contributing factors that support these students and catapult them to the degree completion mark.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
May 26, 2022

Around the Water Cooler, Minus the Water Cooler

Build College Community, Resilience, and Trust through Campus-Wide Meetings

More than 100 Muskegon Community College employees attend weekly, all-college meetings. These are essential touchpoints for communication, learning, and planning.

From Volume 50 Number 3 | April–June 2022

Abstract: Since 2011 Michigan’s Muskegon Community College has held all-campus meetings every Friday morning. Initially the meetings were for student services staff to share information and updates. When COVID-19 caused a rapid shift to virtual course and service delivery, meeting attendance more than tripled as the college community drew together to understand what was happening, what was needed from and expected of employees, and how to connect with colleagues when doing so in person was not possible.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 26, 2022

The Future of Planning is . . .

. . . Aligned, Integrated, and Collaborative Institutional Effectiveness

IE professionals are both translators and integrators—and universities need these people who know how to interpret the data. Within the context of an IIE office, they assist in developing data-informed strategic plans, financial forecasts, enrollment plans, and other assessments of institutional efficacy.

From Volume 50 Number 3 | April–June 2022

Abstract: The institutions that will thrive in the future will be those that use high-quality, relevant mission-driven data as part of their strategic, integrated planning process. Because of this it is imperative to create integrated institutional effectiveness (IIE) offices that serve as the connective tissue among all units within a college or university. The data and expertise of institutional effectiveness can be leveraged to benefit the institution as a whole. In this article, we discuss the value of creating an IIE office and challenges associated with a centralized infrastructure.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 26, 2022

Book Review: Work Force Rx

Agile and Inclusive Strategies for Employers, Educators and Workers in Unsettled Times

From Volume 50 Number 3 | April–June 2022

Abstract: Work Force Rx: Agile and Inclusive Strategies for Employers, Educators and Workers in Unsettled Times
by Van Ton-Quinlivan
Master Catalyst Press: mastercatalyst.org: 2021
266 pages
ISBN: 978-1737627524

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 6, 2022

Teetering on the Demographic Cliff, Part 3

Different Conditions Require a Different Kind of Planning

Higher education has faced major changes for some time—COVID-19 accelerated that volatility—and now we’re anticipating the demographic downslope in student enrollment. How and when should institutions mobilize for the difficult work of planning in the face of wrenching change?

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: Part 1 of this series described a major contraction in the pool of college-going 18-year-olds that will reverse decades of growth and stability for higher education. Part 2 explored how we can shape a planning context that supports success in the coming 10 or 20 years. Part 3 suggests how our approach to planning must shift to prepare for abrupt change.

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Blog

Published
March 17, 2022

Who Are Our Planners—and What Do They Read?

October 2021 marked Planning for Higher Education’s 50th issue! To celebrate, we’re looking back at earlier articles in Planning to reflect on how things change (and, sometimes, how they don’t). Planning is an essential resource for all higher education administrators, planning analysts, and theorists from many disciplines. In this post, the author describes each group of planners and identifies the types of information each group can glean from the journal articles.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 15, 2021

Teetering on the Demographic Cliff, Part 2

Turning Away from the Challenge Is the Riskiest Strategy of All

Higher education has faced major changes for some time—COVID-19 accelerated that volatility—and now we’re anticipating the demographic downslope in student enrollment. How and when should institutions mobilize for the difficult work of planning in the face of wrenching change?

From Volume 50 Number 1 | October–December 2021

Abstract: Part 1 of this series described a major contraction in the pool of college-going 18-year-olds that will reverse decades of growth and stability for higher education. Drawing on the path-breaking analysis of Carleton College economist Nathan Grawe, it outlined how widespread but variable the change will be, and discussed some of the effects—on enrollment, revenue, facilities, staffing, and more—for which colleges and universities should be preparing. This Part 2 explores these implications: How can we shape a planning context that supports success in the coming 10 or 20 years? What attitudes and skillsets will remain useful, and what may need to change?

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Conference Recordings

Published
October 5, 2021

Can a Campus Plan Drive Equity?

Wake Tech Says Yes!

Come find out how you can apply lessons learned and strategies from Wake Tech's inclusive master planning process to successfully respond to opportunities and challenges of diverse enrollment on your campus.
Abstract: This session will showcase best practices for successfully planning and funding higher education facilities to train future workforces, serve the community, leverage curriculum flexibility, and ensure student success, accessibility, and equity. Wake Technical Community College made a bold decision to reorganize its capital improvement plan to address inequality in an underserved population by creating a new future-forward campus. Come find out how you can apply lessons learned and strategies from Wake Tech's inclusive master planning process to successfully respond to opportunities and challenges of diverse enrollment on your campus.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 17, 2021

Teetering on the Demographic Cliff, Part 1

Prepare Now for the Challenging Times Ahead

A long-term decline in birth rates raises fundamental planning questions for higher education as the pool of 18-year-olds contracts after 2025. How can planners and leaders use the time we have to prepare for some of the most wrenching changes in a generation?

From Volume 49 Number 4 | July–September 2021

Abstract: A long-term decline in birth rates raises fundamental planning questions for higher education as the pool of 18-year-olds contracts after 2025. This Planning for Higher Education series explores how planners and leaders can use the time we have to prepare for some of the most wrenching changes in a generation. This article, Part 1, surveys the planning horizon as we emerge from COVID-19 and describes the challenges ahead. Part 2 considers specific planning strategies institutions can adopt to meet the challenge. Part 3 tackles perhaps the most daunting challenge: how to mobilize institutions to actually do what needs to be done, however inconvenient (or worse) that may be.

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