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Learning Resources

Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Example Plans

Published
May 31, 2022

Supporting Document

This green paper (a preliminary report of proposals published to stimulate discussion) introduces the primary concepts and advantages of integrated planning, designating it as the approach that will frame the institution’s upcoming strategic planning process.
Abstract: From the introduction:
“Envision TRU culminated with the approval of a new institutional vision, values and change goals. The COVID-19 pandemic has put a pause on our work towards vision realization and goals prioritization. We now are picking up where we left off. This green paper is intended to present a general outline and stimulate discussion on how Thompson Rivers University (TRU) can work towards living our new vision and achievement of our 10-year goals.”

Contents:
  • What Is Integrated Planning
  • Planning Process Model
  • Why Adopt Integrated Planning At TRU
  • Strategic Framework Approaches
  • Integrated Planning Implementation
  • How Will We Realize Envision TRU?
  • Planning, Budgeting and Assessment
  • Next Steps

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
May 26, 2022

Around the Water Cooler, Minus the Water Cooler

Build College Community, Resilience, and Trust through Campus-Wide Meetings

More than 100 Muskegon Community College employees attend weekly, all-college meetings. These are essential touchpoints for communication, learning, and planning.

From Volume 50 Number 3 | April–June 2022

Abstract: Since 2011 Michigan’s Muskegon Community College has held all-campus meetings every Friday morning. Initially the meetings were for student services staff to share information and updates. When COVID-19 caused a rapid shift to virtual course and service delivery, meeting attendance more than tripled as the college community drew together to understand what was happening, what was needed from and expected of employees, and how to connect with colleagues when doing so in person was not possible.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
February 25, 2022

Fully Engaged

Integrated Planning Was Leveraged to Optimize Community Participation in the University of California, Berkeley’s Campus Master Plan

The most effective master plans are those that reflect the myriad voices of the institution. Engagement should be informative, inclusive, meaningful, and fun—and should be the product of an integrated process.

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: The most effective master plans are those that reflect the myriad voices of the institution. We’re finding the engagement process is fast becoming as important a product of the plan as the plan itself. Engagement should be informative, inclusive, meaningful, and fun—and should be the product of an integrated process. Leveraging the University of California, Berkeley’s Campus Master Plan as a case study, this article provides a framework for developing custom engagement strategies, and highlights examples, lessons learned, and tips for optimizing meaningful participation.

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Example Plans

Published
February 23, 2022

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Webinar Recordings

Published
January 13, 2022

Higher Education Business Models Under Stress, Part 2

Graceful Business Model Transitions: Planning and Executing a College or Campus Closure

Join a panel discussion moderated by Rick Seltzer, senior editor of Higher Ed Dive, with guest panelists Melody Rose, author of AGB’s new book Higher Education Business Models Under Stress, and Lynn Priddy and James Lyons Sr., higher education leaders with experience closing financially distressed colleges and universities.
Abstract: Securing financial viability requires an engaged board that is monitoring the right trends and campus indicators, asking the right questions of campus leaders about the institution’s finances, and doing the scenario planning and stress testing necessary to transform a business model under stress.

The governing board’s fiduciary duty to steward the institution’s financial health requires that boards and leaders consider business model transformations, and plan for a range of scenarios like mergers, affiliations, strategic partnerships, and even—when all other options are exhausted—final transformations such as campus closures when continued mission fulfillment is impossible.

This is part two of a two-part webinar series delivered in partnership between SCUP and the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB), “Higher Education Business Models Under Stress: Planning for Successful Transitions”. This series will help build your fiduciary understanding of your institution’s business model as you prepare the campus for a range of possible business transformations, from mergers, strategic affiliations, corporate partnerships, or even the ultimate scenario of a campus closure. View the recording for part one, “Board Oversight of Finance and the Business Model: Key Indicators and Trends for Scenario Planning and Stress Testing”.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 25, 2021

Flexing Beyond the Pandemic

IT as a Change Leader: Driving Institutional Goals Around Retention and Enrollment

The IT division at Minnesota State University, Mankato— working as part of a campus-wide collaborative effort—quickly and successfully installed new tech in more than 100 classrooms within months of COVID-19 first appearing. Outcomes of the large-scale project are seen as a key attractor for incoming students, regardless of where they are learning.

From Volume 49 Number 3 | April–June 2021

Abstract: With the pandemic forcing education online, IT has become integral to keeping campuses moving forward. With a visionary team dedicated to student-centered experiences, the IT division at Minnesota State University, Mankato managed to quickly and successfully install new tech in more than 100 classrooms within months of COVID-19 first appearing. In this period of crisis, their information technology team created a campus-wide collaboration to introduce and integrate new course delivery opportunities. Outcomes of the large-scale project are seen as transformational and a key attractor for incoming students—regardless of where they are learning.

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Conference Recordings

Published
March 9, 2021

2021 Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2021

Keynote | University of Pittsburgh

Come learn how the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) fostered a sense of community and belonging, created volunteer experiences, and motivated students to comply with health and safety rules during a public health crisis.
Abstract: Early in the pandemic, the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt) took deliberate steps to communicate, engage, and collaborate with its campus and surrounding neighborhood. These actions included health and safety measures and programs, channels for addressing concerns, and efforts to meet basic campus and community needs. This session will focus on how the university encouraged adherence to health and safety guidelines by using a framework emphasizing culture, education, compliance, and support. Come learn how Pitt fostered a sense of community and belonging, created volunteer experiences, and motivated students to comply with health and safety rules during a public health crisis.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
November 23, 2020

Planning for Instructional Continuity

Develop a Communication and Implementation Strategy Before a Short-Term Class Disruption Happens

Classes can be cancelled because of inclement weather, faculty being unavailable, IT or power outages, pandemic-related closures, and other occurrences. The result of any of these circumstances can be a loss of instruction. St. Joseph’s University developed and applied a best practices guide to ensure the continuation of instruction in the advent of many short-term disruptions.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: When a class is cancelled because of weather, faculty unavailability, IT outage, power outage, or pandemic-related closure, it can result in a loss of instruction. This article details best practices for instructional continuity for many short-term disruptions. Different types of short-term disruptions are identified, as well as how they impact instruction based on course modality. Finally, the article suggests responses for the circumstances, provides a pathway to collaborate with faculty to create a best practices guide for instructional continuity, and shows how to develop a communication and implementation strategy for the plan to reset expectations about instructional disruptions.

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