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  • Institution: Keene State Collegex

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
June 1, 2000

Open Space: An Innovative Technique for Partcipatory Planning

Without predetermined agendas or participants,this process increases meaningful involvement of faculty and staff.

From Volume 28 Number 4 | Summer 2000

Abstract: Campus leaders frequently feel restricted by the limited menu of options at their disposal when attempting to secure input or participation from constituencies across the campus. This article explores one innovative technique, open space technology, which has shown to produce both meaningful involvement and results across a number of campuses, whether in strategic planning, curriculum reform, teaching, or cross-unit problem solving.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 1, 1973

Consortia

The Decision-Makers

Consortia, their impact on cooperating institutions, and critical factors in inter-institutional planning were the subject of a recent study for the United States Office of Education. This article, by staff members of one of the the studied consortia, is devoted to a discussion of the process of consortium decision-making.

From Volume 2 Number 2 | April 1973

Abstract: Consortia, their impact on cooperating institutions, and critical factors in inter-institutional planning were the subject of a recent study for the United States Office of Education, directed by Harold L. Hodgkinson of the Center for Research and Development in Higher Education at the University of California at Berkeley. The critical issues, according to the study findings, are problems of reciprocity and autonomy, coordination of programs among diverse institutions, and strategies for campus involvement and leadership. The following article, by three staff members of the New Hampshire College and University Council—one of the consortia in the Hodgkinson study—is devoted to a discussion of the process of consortium decision-making, touching on the three key issues. The authors are: Lynn G. Johnson, the Council's associate director in charge of academic programs; Dr. William W. Barnard, consultant and coordinator of a two-year Cooperative Curriculum Project, and Douglas W. Lyon, coordinator of January Term Programs and communications coordinator.

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