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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 1, 2005

Designing Postsecondary Education to Meet Future Learning Needs: Imperatives for Planning

The long-term effectiveness of postsecondary institutions is inextricably linked to students’ learning outcomes. Students need to be considered learners who participate actively in their own learning, teaching processes must be reconceptualized as learning processes, and educational goals must be reconceptualized to meet the needs of individual and professional goals.

From Volume 34 Number 1 | September–November 2005

Abstract: Many sectors in American postsecondary education are experiencing rapid growth, largely due to the maintained and increased need for educational services, research capabilities, and public outreach, community service, and civic engagement opportunities. The factors shaping the institutional responses include demographic changes, pressure for increased accountability, higher expectations, and greater competition. These factors, among others, compel institutions to rethink their present structures and activities and to envision a future designed to meet the demands of an increasingly heterogeneous group of stakeholders. This article discusses how these changes are causing academic and institutional planners to reconsider the traditional perspectives in the face of emerging concepts in the delivery of educational services. Particular attention is paid to three topics that are key to the rethinking of service delivery. First, students should be considered learners who participate actively in their own learning. This, in turn, implies that teaching practices must be reconceptualized as learning processes. In addition, educational goals must be reconceptualized to meet the needs of individual and professional goals. The implications of these emerging views for strategies for institutional planning are discussed.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 1998

Organizational Transformation Begins With You

Our capacity to see things differently is the platform for change.

From Volume 26 Number 4 | Summer 1998

Abstract: Charges institutions with the responsibility for planning beyond the immediate need for survival, and for imagining instead what might be possible. Sees the potential for colleges and universities to model what it means to be a learning organization at all levels, and suggests cultivating a spirit of innovation, experimentation, and risk taking. At the very least, the author concludes, institutions must learn what keeps them from taking action, reflecting on the needs of learners, or extending across the institution the strategies that have been proven to work.

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