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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Conference Recordings

Published
July 16, 2021

Achieving a Sustainable Campus Master Plan through Integrative Design

This session will explore Princeton University’s campus master plan, which engages an ethos of sustainability through the lens of carbon emissions, landscape design, energy, and water efficiency, from design through construction.
Abstract: The building sector contributes forty percent of carbon emissions globally. Given the climate crisis, it is imperative that campus facilities and planning departments address sustainability in a rigorous and fiscally responsible way. This session will explore Princeton University’s campus master plan, which engages an ethos of sustainability through the lens of carbon emissions, landscape design, energy, and water efficiency, from design through construction. Find out how you can apply Princeton's ambitious sustainability goals and lessons learned to your master plan and sustainably develop your projects for the benefit of your campus environment and community.

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Conference Recordings

Published
March 18, 2021

2021 North Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2021

Better Value and Outcomes through Integrative Design

In this session, we'll share our results and challenges with the Integrative Design Process (IDP) at Princeton, and show how you can use an IDP to realize better value and outcomes for your campus project.
Abstract: The Integrative Design Process (IDP) is a powerful collaborative framework that aligns with an institution's culture to cost-effectively achieve any project's desired outcomes. After adopting IDP incrementally since 2003, Princeton University has created a full program, including a roadmap and in-depth training. A well-designed IDP supports participation and buy-in from users and effective collaboration in project teams-that means fewer changes during the construction documents phase and construction, smoother turnover, and better performance. In this session, we'll share our results and challenges and show how you can use an IDP to realize better value and outcomes for your campus project.

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Conference Recordings

Published
March 18, 2021

2021 North Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2021

The Future Campus

A Dialogue with Three Institutions and Learning Technologist

A panel of three institutions and a learning technologist will offer their diverse perspectives on these issues and how they're influencing the physical and virtual campus environment: an unprecedented pandemic; rapidly-accelerating climate change; a mobile technology-enabled society; and critical issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion
Abstract: Higher education will shape its future through its response to this critical moment: an unprecedented pandemic; rapidly-accelerating climate change; a mobile technology-enabled society; and critical issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion. As new values, core issues, and questions continue to emerge, institutions must face these challenges by weighing different impacts and shifting priorities. A panel of three institutions and a learning technologist will offer their diverse perspectives on these issues and how they're influencing the physical and virtual campus environment. Come join the dialogue and adopt an inquiry-based mindset to proactively plan for a more agile and resilient future campus.

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Report

Published
November 23, 2020

The Connected Campus

Building Long-Term Value and Agility by Connecting Offerings, Organizations and Operations

Campus environments play a vital role in student success. By making changes to their combination of spaces, institutions can respond to the shifts transforming higher education. Elliot Felix shares how colleges and universities can prepare for a more blended world by bringing together the digital and physical, enabling greater diversity and inclusion, and implementing flexible structures, staffing, space, and services. Sponsored Content: Knoll and brightspot strategy.
Abstract: Historic separations that defined higher education are dissolving: research is more interdisciplinary, online and on-campus learning are converging, wet and dry labs are blending, teaching and research overlap, and academia forges relationships with corporate partners. Institutions, by improving how they connect what they offer, how they are organized, and how they operate, can build value and agility to better assist their people on campus. Real-world examples in this white paper from Knoll and brightspot strategy discuss how campus spaces support student success, including how to fully use the campus; creating spaces that sustain diverse and flexible ways of working; thinking phygitally; and creating environments where today’s purpose-driven and entrepreneurial students (Gen Z) will thrive as they prepare to enter the workforce.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
March 16, 2020

2020 Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference | March 2020

Delivering on Vision

Princeton’s New Lake Campus

South of its historic campus, Princeton is expanding into land that has been preserved for the past century to build its Lake Campus, a new center for research, discovery, recreation, and student life.
Abstract: Long-term thinking and project implementation are the foundations of campus planning. Princeton is balancing future focus (planning for 200 years) with the pressing need to implement initial phases quickly and efficiently. South of its historic campus, Princeton is expanding into land that has been preserved for the past century to build its Lake Campus, a new center for research, discovery, recreation, and student life. Come learn how new methods of planning, design, and implementation can deliver holistic campuses by combining vertical projects with site development in a single, integrated process.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
July 1, 2019

Another Day Older, Another Day Better

Institutions Are Infusing New Life Into Mid-Century Campus Buildings

While they might be historical gems, are mid-century campus buildings still structurally sound? Is their location and architecture meaningful to the institution? What about energy efficient and fiscally responsible? College and university leaders must make the call: to fix or not to fix.

From Volume 47 Number 4 | July–September 2019

Abstract: Replace, restore, or renovate? In this article, architects, engineers, and campus administrators offer insights on updating mid-century buildings. Averaging a half-century old, these once-innovative structures are showing signs of age. The author gives guidance on transforming them into buildings that make positive contributions to the 21st-century campus. Topics covered include how to assess a building’s potential for renovation, options for energy-efficient HVAC systems, choosing materials that enhance the building’s performance and reduce operating costs, updating 50-year-old floor plans to support today’s pedagogy, and funding models and sources for projects.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
January 1, 2019

Physical and Financial Planning for the Whole Campus

Chapter Seven of Eight Schools: Campus and Culture

In earlier years, preceding the advent of strategic planning, campus development was limited by available funds, and most buildings were located to meet short-term need.

From Volume 47 Number 2 | January–March 2019

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2004

Endowment Spending—A Double-Edged Sword

Sharp changes in endowment market values highlight the importance of having an informed and balanced strategy regarding endowment spending. That has never been more evident than in the ups and downs experienced by institutions during the past 5–6 years.

From Volume 32 Number 3 | March–May 2004

Abstract: The growing ability of private colleges and universities to use a high level of annual endowment spending in support of current operations has been a source of financial strength during much of the past two decades. More recently, however, declining endowments at most colleges have raised concerns about declines in the availability of annual endowment spending. Decreases or stagnation in endowment spending would pose a particular challenge for colleges that have grown most reliant on such endowment support. This article describes these recent changes in endowment support for current operations, analyzes how the budgetary strains have arisen, and suggests ways that colleges may respond to the strains.

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