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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
August 26, 2022

Social Equity and the Modern Campus

Framework Plans Level the Playing Field for All Students

Campus framework plans for Oregon State University and Bellevue College fully integrate social equity with engagement processes and physical solutions to improve the sense of welcome and inclusion.

From Volume 50 Number 4 | July–September 2022

Abstract: The article explores campus design implications for socially equitable college and university environments. Two institutions that carry the value of social equity as dominant themes in their mission and strategic plans are showcased. Bellevue College’s equity plan acts as the cornerstone for social justice on campus. Oregon State University’s new Strategic Plan 4.0 includes sense of belonging and inclusion as core values. For both, the physical campus framework plans, used to guide campus development and design over time, fully integrate social equity through processes of engagement and physical solutions that improve a sense of welcome and inclusion.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
July 14, 2019

2019 Annual Conference | July 2019

The Geometry of Learning

Experiences From the Arena Classroom

Abstract: In 2015, Oregon State University's 300- and 600-seat arena classrooms welcomed their first students. Now, we have detailed analysis that measures the effectiveness of these classrooms. This session will discuss optimal pedagogical strategies for round classrooms, explain the IT infrastructure that makes these spaces successful, and provide insight into how data is analyzed for meaningful feedback. We'll share initial research on academic impact, faculty feedback, lessons learned, and next-generation trends in arena classroom design.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
March 27, 2019

2019 Pacific Regional Conference | March 2019

Buildings From the ’50s, ’60s, and ’70s

Rehab or Tear Down?

See how other campuses are dealing with buildings from this era as it relates to policy and capital projects. We'll include case studies of both rehabilitation and tear-down.
Abstract: Many institutions are trying to figure out what to do with buildings from the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, many of which could be considered “background buildings”. With failing systems and extensive upgrade costs, what are the pros and cons of renew versus replace? Can “old” be made new again while maintaining architectural diversity for students on campus? See how other campuses are dealing with this issue as it relates to policy and capital projects. We'll include case studies of both rehabilitation and tear-down.

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Free

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Free

Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
January 1, 2006

Developing and Implementing a Higher Education Quality Initiative

The Oakland University School of Education and Human Services' Quality Initiative is discussed in the context of the history of higher education and quality management, with comparison to initiatives at Fordham University, Lienhard School of Nursing, the College of Nursing at Rush University, the University of Alabama, Oregon State University, and the University of Illinois at Chicago.

From Volume 34 Number 2 | January–March 2006

Abstract: Born out of a belief that higher education must improve its delivery of service, the School of Education and Human Services at Oakland University initiated and implemented a quality system. To better respond to market need, this initiative focused on current behavior and the future needs of the students, faculty, and school-at-large. This article reports the steps taken, lessons learned, and recommendations developed for implementing a quality initiative process successfully within a university culture. The outcome of this process was the creation of a template that can be used by other units in higher education.

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