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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.

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Conference Presentations

Delivered
October 6, 2019

2019 Southern Regional Conference | October 2019

First-Year Success

Campus Housing Models that Help Students Succeed

We will share examples of rapidly changing student expectations and prepare you to assess your first-year student housing offerings and evaluate their relationships to student success.
Abstract: Institutions have determined through surveys and research that building design and location significantly affect first-year student's happiness and academic success. In response, they are implementing significant changes to on-campus housing. Understanding how different housing models influence first-year students allows institutions to provide students with a strong social foundation that can significantly affect recruitment and retention. We will share examples of rapidly changing student expectations and prepare you to assess your student housing offerings and evaluate their relationships to student success.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2005

Understanding Higher Education Costs

Colleges and universities must be more proactive in describing to a wider public their of fiscal and human resources because, among other reasons, a careful analysis reveals counterintuitive results that support a finding that higher education has been fiscally responsible.

From Volume 33 Number 3 | March–May 2005

Abstract: Public discussion of higher education costs frequently confuses price with expenditure. This article examines factors associated with increases in the sticker price of a college education and the expenditures incurred by institutions in delivering that education. The discussion suggests that while growth in college tuition is real, access to higher education has not been reduced. Moreover, data indicate that colleges and universities have been responsible fiscal stewards in containing costs over which they have control.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 1, 2002

Faculty Productivity: Different Strategies for Different Audiences

A one–size–fits–all approach to describing faculty activity is inappropriate—and potentially harmful.

From Volume 30 Number 3 | Spring 2002

Abstract: Colleges and universities are faced with increasing demands for accountability and performance data with respect to faculty activity and productivity from diverse audiences and constituencies, ranging from academic planners and legislators to parents and taxpayers. This article argues that different audiences have different information needs and that a one-size-fits-all approach to describing faculty activity and productivity is both inappropriate and potentially harmful. Concrete strategies are proposed for providing appropriate information to these disparate groups.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 1, 1998

How Much Do Faculty Really Teach?

Tenured and tenure-track faculty generate a much larger proportion of undergraduate teaching activity than might be expected.

From Volume 27 Number 2 | Winter 1998–1999

Abstract: This paper revisits anaylsis done in the 1996, using data from the Delaware Study of Instructional Costs and Productivity. That analysis found that tenured and tenure track faculty generate a much larger proportion of undergraduate teaching activity then might be expected in light of public criticism of American higher education. The 1996 methodology is replicated using data from two most recent iterations of the Delaware Study. The result is a three year trend line that more clearly indicates how much faculty really teach, and associated coast and productivity measures.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
August 1, 1972

Campus Housing: The Turnkey Route

From Volume 1 Number 1 | August 1972

Abstract: Building cost escalation has forced up the price of new campus housing to the point that, under conventional planning and construction methods, dormitory space can cost as much as $10,000 or more per bed. Given such costs, many institutions find it difficult if not impossible to finance new housing without raising student rental charges to prohibitive levels. In response, a number of institutions have sought ways to provide housing at substantially lower cost. One solution is the so-called "turnkey" approach, in which a developer plans, designs, and builds new housing to meet the institution's specifications at a predetermined, fixed cost. This article describes the successful application of the turnkey technique at three institutions--the Universities of Rhode Island, Vermont, and Delaware.

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