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Published
March 1, 2002

Higher Education Costs Concepts, Measurement Issues, Data Sources, and Uses

No single methodology or data source is adequate to address the full array of cost–related issues.

From Volume 30 Number 3 | Spring 2002

Abstract: Over the past decade, the escalating price for a college education has become a prominent concern among the American public, institutions of higher education, and state and federal governments. As a result, much effort has been expended in examining and seeking solutions to this complex problem, with a significant focus on the costs of delivering higher education. This article provides a basic overview of the concept of cost in higher education and related issues, discusses the major consumers of higher education cost data and their perspectives, outlines the major sources of data on higher education costs, and describes some of the major (and perennial) issues related to higher education costs.

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Published
March 1, 2002

National Models for College Costs and Prices

This article examines the relationships among college prices, expenditures, and revenues within various groups of institutions.

From Volume 30 Number 3 | Spring 2002

Abstract: This study examines the relationships among college prices, expenditures, and revenues within four groups of public institutions and three groups of private not-for-profit institutions. To provide context for the analysis, aggregate trends for 1988–89 to 1997–98 were compiled. These data were analyzed through the use of statistical modeling techniques, in which separate models for the public and private not-for-profit sectors were identified and updated with more recent data. In each of these models, the associations between “sticker prices” (published tuition levels) and costs, revenues, and other factors were explored to provide some insight into the nature of higher education finance.

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Published
January 1, 2002

Innovation in Student Services

Planning for Models Blending High Touch-High Tech

The authors, who are among IBM best practice partners, share they have been successful in integrating technology into their student services projects, redesigning their processes, implementing change, and extending their brand.
Abstract: This publication, a follow-up to the popular Planning for Student Services: Best Practices for the 21st Century, introduces the topic of web portals and call centers needed to support web services. It also describes the lessons learned from one-stop centers, which are causing facilities to be redesigned and new service career paths to be defined. Services have become a strategic issue for institutions, and web strategies—driven by web services—have become critical as well. The authors, who are among IBM best practice partners, present case studies of their institutions by describing their experiences in these areas. They also show how they have been successful in integrating technology into their student services projects, redesigning their processes, implementing change, and extending their brand.

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Published
December 1, 2001

Federal Freedom to Work Law Challenges Academic Planning

The Senior Citizens’ Freedom to Work Act of 2000 might affect the retirement decisions of older faculty.

From Volume 30 Number 2 | Winter 2001–2002

Abstract: This article examines the academic planning implications of “The Senior Citizens’ Freedom to Work Act of 2000.” The act sharply reduces Social Security retirement benefit penalties previously imposed on 65- to 69-year-old professionals who earned more than nominal incomes after enrolling in the program, potentially delaying their retirement decisions. Further, the average salary level of senior professors in U.S. colleges and universities places them among those who will most heavily benefit from the act, which might change the age composition of academic faculties significantly over time. This article closes with a discussion of the act’s potential impact on faculty turnover rates, academic staffing patterns, and the age distribution of academic faculties.

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Published
December 1, 2001

How to Build a Residential College

From Volume 30 Number 2 | Winter 2001–2002

Abstract: The quality of campus life in large universities has declined over the years as faculty have given up responsibility for student life outside the classroom and institutions have become ever more bureaucratized. To solve this problem, universities should establish systems of small, decentralized academic communities modeled ultimately on the residential colleges of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge. In the United States, Harvard and Yale Universities first adopted this residential college model in the 1930s, and it is now spreading to many institutions, public and private, large and small.

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