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Where planning comes together. T​he power of SCUP is its community. We learn from one another, sharing how we’ve achieved success and, maybe more importantly, what we’ve learned from failure. SCUP authors, produces, and curates thousands of resources to help you prepare for the future, overcome challenges, and bring planning together at your college or university.
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Published
November 30, 1988

Financial Planning Guidelines for Facility Renewal and Adaption

This publication provides executive managers and trustees with guidelines for long-term financial planning for plant renewal and adaption.
Abstract: Skillful management of an institution's physical assets is crucial to the institution's financial well-being. This publication provides executive managers and trustees with guidelines for long-term financial planning for plant renewal and adaption. It provides these strategic decision makers with a better understanding of the financial planning requirements necessary to protect the value of their institution's plant assets in relation to evolving institutional missions by giving them a clearer way to think about those assets. Readers are furnished with guidelines, examples of campus plans that incorporate them, and analytic tools.

A joint project of Society for College and University Planning (SCUP), The National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO), The Association of Physical Plant Administrators of Universities and Colleges (APPA), and Coopers and Lybrand.

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Campus Facility Site Selection and Matrix Evaluation of Weighted Alternatives: A Methodology

From Volume 17 Number 4 | 1988–1989

Abstract: Too often, site slection decisions for college and university facilities are limited to previously designated sites, using standard architectural, engineering, and landscape design. While the least cost method project completion is correct, frequently the site selection decision is not easily justified to adminstrators, client departments, and community leaders. Campus planners must make selection recommendations based on qualitive factors that are not easily comparable to alternatives (criteria such as visual effect, parking access, and site development costs are part of the decision making process). Thus, a matrix evaluation model is a means of alternative site selection. It is a system of weights and scores that are "easily managed and publicly defendable." The site selection process has two parts. It deals with alternative site selection and developing selection criteria for comparable evaluation. The second part includes organization of a weight scale and quantitative site evaluation. The process consists of eight steps. These include (1) Clarify programmed site requirements and criteria; (2) Select preliminary sites; (3) Establish selection criteria; (4) Develop a site list; (5) Make a preliminary recommendation; (6) Secure a final decision; (7) Perform a weighted evaluation; and (8) Make a final recommendation. Facility site selection decisions made using a matrix model with its system of weights and scores is easier to justify to administrators, client departments, and community organizations. Once they are involved in the decision making process the reason for the site selection is more readily understood, thus increasing the likelihood of site decision approval.

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Planning and Selling a Successful Parking Solution: A Case Study

From Volume 17 Number 2 | 1988–1989

Abstract: Creating a pedestrian-oriented campus and accommodating parking needs involves the reduction of traffic flow through the campus. The space necessary for university parking lots and streets consumes "a percentage of premium interior space." Long- range planning is essential to develop a perimeter circulation pattern that joins parking lots on the edge of campus and initiates a shuttle bus system. The campus master plan at Eastern Michigan University has a goal of developing a pedestrian-oriented campus. To accomplish this, EMU--with the help of consultants-- contructed a 1,000-car parking lot and shuttle bus system. Security was a primary concern; a six-foot fence on three sides was built to keep people from entering the area, lighting was provided, two bus shelters were added next to busy thoroughfare, a television camera was installed, and a campus emergency telephone was installed. No report of assault or vandalism has occured since implementation of the project. Furthermore, aesthetic appeal was a primary concern. This was combined with "security considerations . . . to facilitate the intended function of a particular area." Multiple use of the parking area added to its success. Along with its use as a shuttle bus parking facility, the satellite parking lot is used for football tailgating, football games and other athletic events, and on-site university events. Finally, the parking area was promoted as a safe, aesthetically pleasing option to attract faculty, staff, and students. Effective planning resulted in the development of a pedestrian-oriented campus where traffic and parking problems had diminished.

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Design Criteria for Effective Classrooms

From Volume 17 Number 1 | 1988–1989

Abstract: In the late 1980s, the University of California, Santa Cruz began a $1.5 million program to upgrade classroom quality. This was disturbing considering the campus was only 25 years old. The problem was neither architectural neglect nor budgetary deficits. Quality problems resulted from the attitude that classroom design was not an important element. Many design flaws occur from misunderstanding the factors that affect user need, such as the ability to see or hear (the reduction of ambient noise). Additionally, required surfaces and finishes are important. These include the sending end--front wall, side walls, and ceiling; side walls and rear wall; ceiling; and floor/seating. Finally, design for durability and functionality under actual use conditions consists of the following: the use of carpet for acoustically absorbent wall finish, installation of motorized blackboards and the projection screen, a seat width of 21 inches, and quiet table arms for seats. Colleges and universities must realize that "effective classroom design" elicits attention to detail and an understanding of functional objectives. Adherence to both can lead to effective classrooms.

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