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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
May 26, 2022

Around the Water Cooler, Minus the Water Cooler

Build College Community, Resilience, and Trust through Campus-Wide Meetings

More than 100 Muskegon Community College employees attend weekly, all-college meetings. These are essential touchpoints for communication, learning, and planning.

From Volume 50 Number 3 | April–June 2022

Abstract: Since 2011 Michigan’s Muskegon Community College has held all-campus meetings every Friday morning. Initially the meetings were for student services staff to share information and updates. When COVID-19 caused a rapid shift to virtual course and service delivery, meeting attendance more than tripled as the college community drew together to understand what was happening, what was needed from and expected of employees, and how to connect with colleagues when doing so in person was not possible.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 26, 2022

Book Review: Work Force Rx

Agile and Inclusive Strategies for Employers, Educators and Workers in Unsettled Times

From Volume 50 Number 3 | April–June 2022

Abstract: Work Force Rx: Agile and Inclusive Strategies for Employers, Educators and Workers in Unsettled Times
by Van Ton-Quinlivan
Master Catalyst Press: mastercatalyst.org: 2021
266 pages
ISBN: 978-1737627524

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
April 6, 2022

Teetering on the Demographic Cliff, Part 3

Different Conditions Require a Different Kind of Planning

Higher education has faced major changes for some time—COVID-19 accelerated that volatility—and now we’re anticipating the demographic downslope in student enrollment. How and when should institutions mobilize for the difficult work of planning in the face of wrenching change?

From Volume 50 Number 2 | January–March 2022

Abstract: Part 1 of this series described a major contraction in the pool of college-going 18-year-olds that will reverse decades of growth and stability for higher education. Part 2 explored how we can shape a planning context that supports success in the coming 10 or 20 years. Part 3 suggests how our approach to planning must shift to prepare for abrupt change.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
March 17, 2022

Book Review: Higher Education Business Models Under Stress

Achieving Graceful Transitions in the Academy

From Volume 50 Number 2 | Jan–Mar 2022

Abstract: Higher Education Business Models Under Stress: Achieving Graceful Transitions in the Academy
by Melody Rose and Larry D. Large
AGP: Washington, DC: 2021
140 Pages
ISBN: 978-1-951635-12-1

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
December 15, 2021

Teetering on the Demographic Cliff, Part 2

Turning Away from the Challenge Is the Riskiest Strategy of All

Higher education has faced major changes for some time—COVID-19 accelerated that volatility—and now we’re anticipating the demographic downslope in student enrollment. How and when should institutions mobilize for the difficult work of planning in the face of wrenching change?

From Volume 50 Number 1 | October–December 2021

Abstract: Part 1 of this series described a major contraction in the pool of college-going 18-year-olds that will reverse decades of growth and stability for higher education. Drawing on the path-breaking analysis of Carleton College economist Nathan Grawe, it outlined how widespread but variable the change will be, and discussed some of the effects—on enrollment, revenue, facilities, staffing, and more—for which colleges and universities should be preparing. This Part 2 explores these implications: How can we shape a planning context that supports success in the coming 10 or 20 years? What attitudes and skillsets will remain useful, and what may need to change?

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
November 5, 2021

The Integrated Triad

Apply the Three Time Horizons Perspective to Planning and Governance

An integrated model of three horizons, three areas of planning, and three types of governance is presented as a framework for institutional leadership.

From Volume 50 Number 1 | October–December 2021

Abstract: The global COVID-19 pandemic has fundamentally changed the world of higher education. As institutions look to the future, beyond the end of the pandemic, significant uncertainty exists. There is little question that colleges and universities will have to do a better job at planning, and boards at governing, to flourish in the years ahead. In this article an integrated model centered around three different time horizons, three areas of planning, and three types of governance is presented. The model can serve as a framework to demonstrate how these are all related, self-reinforcing, and usable as an aid for institutional leadership.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
September 17, 2021

Teetering on the Demographic Cliff, Part 1

Prepare Now for the Challenging Times Ahead

A long-term decline in birth rates raises fundamental planning questions for higher education as the pool of 18-year-olds contracts after 2025. How can planners and leaders use the time we have to prepare for some of the most wrenching changes in a generation?

From Volume 49 Number 4 | July–September 2021

Abstract: A long-term decline in birth rates raises fundamental planning questions for higher education as the pool of 18-year-olds contracts after 2025. This Planning for Higher Education series explores how planners and leaders can use the time we have to prepare for some of the most wrenching changes in a generation. This article, Part 1, surveys the planning horizon as we emerge from COVID-19 and describes the challenges ahead. Part 2 considers specific planning strategies institutions can adopt to meet the challenge. Part 3 tackles perhaps the most daunting challenge: how to mobilize institutions to actually do what needs to be done, however inconvenient (or worse) that may be.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
May 4, 2021

Agile Leadership in a Volatile World

It Calls for Self-Awareness, Thinking Differently, and Creating Organizational Change

Especially in turbulent times, higher education leaders would be advised to assume the six most valued perspectives: curator, architect, conductor, humanist, advocate, and pioneer.

From Volume 49 Number 3 | April–June 2021

Abstract: An agile mindset exercised by leadership and distilled down into organizational culture is the prerequisite for any higher education institution planning to transform itself in an age of constant disruption. The post-pandemic world will continue to present new challenges for colleges and universities as they seek innovative solutions to plan for an ever increasing volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous (VUCA) environment. Higher education leaders would serve themselves and their institutions well by learning how to practice the six attributes of an agile leader in a volatile world.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
November 9, 2020

Trends in Accreditation

How Will Accreditors Once Again Become Relevant for Higher Education?

Dr. Lynn Priddy answers questions posed by education writer Stephen G. Pelletier related to changes in accreditation and their effect on institutions and students.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: Having been on both the inside of regional accreditation and outside looking back on it, Lynn Priddy knows that accreditation has long tried to revolutionize itself, while at the same time increasingly becoming subject to federal regulatory burdens and expectations from the Department of Education. That has backed it into becoming a bureaucracy at the very time it needed to break out to focus on innovation, learning, and student success.

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Planning for Higher Education Journal

Published
October 30, 2020

Essentially There

Higher Education Returns to Serve

There is a call for higher education institutions to think of ways that knowledge can be created and shared between people— credentialed and noncredentialed—more readily so that society can better handle adversities.

From Volume 49 Number 1 | October–December 2020

Abstract: The education sector is excluded from the 16 official “Critical Infrastructure Sectors” managed by the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency. As the world grapples with a pandemic, this omission lays bare a disconnection between critical infrastructures serving daily life and the ground plane of learning and knowledge creation on which they are built; such a severing between ground plane and structure does not bode well for the entire assembly. For us to flourish as a society, higher education institutions—already grounded in a landscape of learning and knowledge creation—need to be a foundational support to essential infrastructures sustaining daily life in communities small and large.

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